Old Photo - How Many Ford Mechanics Does It Take To............

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - How Many Ford Mechanics Does It Take To............
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:43 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:51 pm:

There are nine guys in the photograph and only one of them does not need an oil change :-)

N


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:14 am:

Having shop coveralls that could stand on their own must have been a mechanics badge of honor back in the day. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:44 am:

The guy with the drill is installing an outside oil line from Birdhaven!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:59 am:

Is this a picture of a school? The guy standing at the engine block looks significantly older than the other eight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 01:15 am:

OK everyone, look busy they're going to take our picture!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 07:13 am:

Kinda looks like one of the many winter seminars or gatherings that are held today.

Students being trained by the fellow wearing the fedora.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 07:36 am:

Ground floor Starter and generator rebuilds too!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 07:58 am:

It must be staged. The guy holding the drill motor couldn't contain himself--He's cracking up. The guy next to him is trying to mount a headlight to an intake manifold. The guy on the far left is trying to work on a carb with a 15" spanner wrench. The guy at the drill press isn't using a drill bit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:12 am:

The lighting of the windows and bench at right are terrific. I always wonder what the colors are like.

Rich



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:50 am:

That drill reminds me of the Sioux Heavy Duty that belonged to my Uncle Charles Miller, who died in 1960. I still use it for big stuff. The Heavy part of the name is sure right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 10:10 am:

We had heavy duty 1/2 drills like Steve has pictured at the School maintenance dept. I worked for 33 years.
They were all kinds of tools left at the closed Air Base where the School is located.
It was closed down in the 60's.
The drills, pedestal grinders, drill presses, lathes, and etc were heavy duty well made and would last forever.
The big pedestal grinders would run for 15-20 minutes after we got through using them. The heavy duty bearings in them were smooth and quite.

Those big drills like Steve shows in the pic will break your arm or wrist if you don't know how to brace yourself when drilling some big stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:00 pm:

Steve and John, I have a heavy duty John Oster drill that I inherited from my father. It looks just like the one in Steve's picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

Nice to see tools still on the job made in BC (Before China) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

The guy in the far left of the photo has a (Cresent)adjustable wrench that is far to big for the Model T unless he was removing a wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 12:36 pm:

Kinda funny to see the guys working on the generators on the floor.
Cant be comfortable! But its just staged. Hopefully


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 01:26 pm:

As far as 'the crew', two hands are better than one' and in this case, 16 hands are better than one. Of course, too many cooks can spoil the broth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James L. Bodkin - Jim on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 01:31 pm:

Keen eye Ken! When was the 'rounded head' adjustable wrench invented? I don't recall seeing them in period pictures.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

Bacho in Sweden started making them much like the one in the picture in 1892 after J.P Johansson's improvement of an english invention from 1842.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjustable_spanner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 03:42 pm:

There appears to be an automobile or at least the body from an automobile in the picture. Further, it may be town car that is likely not Ford


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 07:20 pm:

If someone could zero in on the calendar on the right back wall you could see the date. Can anybody make it out?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:25 pm:

Not me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:32 pm:

Steve, I have one of those drills. If your drill bit catch's, it will throw you appetite over A$$hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

If I had to make up a story it would be a 4 year old center door in for an overhaul. Photo taken about 1924 or '25. If it is a school working on older cars it could even be in the thirties. I see no real clues.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 09:07 pm:

thats a sioux 5/8 drill. it will turn over a t motor with the spark plugs in it. nice thing, my friend has one, i am jealous


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 09:37 pm:

Years ago, I had the engine in my New Holland stack wagon throw a rod. I needed a replacement in a hurry, and could not answer all the questions to order one from our local parts house. I got out my parts book and called the New Holland dealer and gave them the part number for the engine. They assured me it would be delivered in 2 days, 3 days later it arrived, it cost about a thousand buck more to order it that way, but as this engine has an external oil pump mounted on the front of the crankshaft, I needed to make sure I had the right one. I spent the afternoon assembling the engine and was ready to install the clutch when I found that the pocket for the carrier baring was 20 thousands too small. I called the New Holland dealer and they told me they got the engine from our local Ford dealership and they parts man at the Ford dealership assured him that the engine was correct to factory blue print specifications. I was instructed to take the engine to the Ford shop where factory trained technicians would install the bearing for me. 6 factory trained technicians proceed to try to hammer a bearing into a hole that was 18 thousands too small for a press fit. When I pointed this out, I was ejected form the shop. As I left, I noticed that there was a sign in the shop that said "not job is too difficult that it can not be accomplished with brute force and ignorance." I do not know if this was an official policy for Ford Motor company or just for Goode Motors, but they were trying to follow the slogan on the sign to the letter.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration