Some traffic jam-Photo- Army cars?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Some traffic jam-Photo- Army cars?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 07:09 pm:



Some of these could be Us Army cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 07:17 pm:

Wow, A Sea of soft tops!!
Neat Photo Herb!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 07:43 pm:

A friend of mine has a similar but substantially larger original panoramic photo that is very similar - a massive gathering of Model T Fords, many with light colored tops. Our opinion is that it was taken in France after the war was over. Perhaps they were getting ready to dispose of (sell) the cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

Interesting picture. It does indeed look like army cars and the tops have been painted white to reflect the sun. The rear windows likely mean a few '16 cars and lots of '17 or '18s. Oil tail lamps too. That car four rows from the right doesn't look so good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 08:09 pm:

This is a nice photo to save and look at after you have finished installing a top and have a little wrinkle.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 12:20 am:

Probably a sporting event. They used to park cars that way early on. Sorta inconvenient if you want to leave early.

I bet in those days no one left the ball park if the score was lopsided. It was a simpler and arguably better time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 12:29 am:

Look again. Not a sporting event.

Those cars have serial numbers and U.S. stenciled on the backs.

Also, those are strictly Ford tourings - no other makes to be seen.

At the extreme upper left, it looks like rows of trucks - possibly Ford ambulances.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 12:55 am:

Hmmm Ok I see what you mean Erik. I see 1917 or later front fenders on some of the cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 06:23 am:

It looks like the negative has a notch code bottom right. I think these were first used in 1925. Mark Osterman on the forum probably knows for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 07:50 am:

The vehicles in the upper left are trucks. Could be a government auction or the motor pool. Some of the cars look well used and with damaged tops.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 07:54 am:

Ops! Sorry Erik, I didn't finish reading your post. They are indeed trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 08:08 am:

Summary: Due to the large number of US vehicles, it is likely that the photo was taken at the Slough Military repair depot in England which became the “Slough dump” by 1919 and was later Slough Estates Ltd.

Additional details:

Slough Military repair depot

From page 251 – 252 of “The English Model T Ford” book – Hap’s summary: The left over WWI military vehicles were consolidated in several locations and were an eye-sore as they rotted away. Model T Fords were one of the primary vehicles but there were others. They noted 16,000 vehicles were rotting at the Kempton Park Racetrack in public view. And that was one location. They show a photo of the Slough Depot in 1920 and it was row after row of Model T Fords – ambulances, light trucks are shown in the foreground and it easily could have had rows of tourings etc. as the Ts continued out of sight on the horizon.

On page 252 it states, [Sir Percival] Perry [previously of Ford England – but he had resigned Jun 30, 1919 – ref page 229] … bought the whole of roughly 13,000 motor vehicles of the US military in Europe for 3.5 million pounds.

For an Arial view of Slough Depot/Dump in the 1920s see the photos at:

http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/cy/image/epw000029?search=slough&ref=10


From: http://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=MRM16302&resou rceID=1028 During the First World War, the War Office chose farmland close to Slough for the location of a military vehicle repair depot. In 1918 the 'Slough Project' was approved by government and 668 hectares of agricultural land was purchased by the War Office for the development of a central military vehicle repair depot. By the end of the war however, the project was still far from complete, but work on site continued. The intention was to repair vehicles for government use or sell them on to the private sector and make a profit. However, progress was slow and the waterlogged site, full of rusting vehicles, became known as 'The Dump'. In 1920 the government sold the 'Slough Project' to a private investor and the Slough Trading Company Ltd. was formed. The investors were Sir Percival Perry and Noel Mobbs, who were successful businessmen with motor trade expertise, who paid the government 7 million for the land, buildings, vehicles and plant - a considerable sum at that time. The investors formed the 'Slough Trading Company Ltd' in May 1920 and the Trading Estate's passenger station was opened in the early 1920's. A trade paper from the time, the 'Motor News', commented 'It will be something of a miracle if they succeed in converting Slough into a money earning concern', although the Slough Observer, on May 15th, commented that the move would create 'The New Slough'. In 1920 Slough Urban District Council extended its boundary to include 312 acres of the Trading Estate which were in the parish of Farnham Royal and parts of Burnham, Stoke Poges and Langley Marsh. In 1926 optimism was justified when the name of the company was changed to Slough Estates Ltd. and the estate was to become the largest business park in Europe under single company ownership <1><2>.

From Wikipedia at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slough_Trading_Estate n April 1920, the Government Surplus Disposal Board sold the 2.7 square kilometre (600 acre) site and its contents (17,000 used cars, trucks and motorcycles, and 170,000 square metres (1.8 million sq ft) of covered workshops) for over seven million pounds. Sir Percival Perry, who had effectively established the British operations of the Ford Motor Company and who had been appointed Assistant Controller of the UK government's Agricultural Machinery Department during the war,[11] and Sir Noel Mobbs, led the group of investors who acquired the depot, establishing the Slough Trading Co. Ltd.
Repair and sale of ex-army vehicles continued until 1925 when the Slough Trading Company Act was passed allowing the company (renamed Slough Estates Ltd) to establish an Industrial Estate. The existing army buildings were tenanted as factories, and additional units were built.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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