OT - Surveying Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT - Surveying Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:12 pm:

I'm sure one of you experts can help me out. I'm trying to find the location of a log cabin that belonged to the original of my 16 coupelet.

Without boring you with details, the original owner was a rancher in a small town in Nebraska. In the late 1990's a research project was undertaken to record historical towns and townships to preserve Nebraska's pioneering history.

The ranchers log cabin was detailed in the findings with the location given as such:

LOCATION: NW 114, NE 114, Sec. 23, T. 34 N., R. 17 W., Jamison.

I have a historical map that shows section 23 for his county but I can't decipher how to find the location of the log cabin given the directions above.

Any help would be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:39 pm:

I guess these people are of no help
http://www.sso.nebraska.gov/repo/strwi.asp


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:48 pm:

Many records have never been computerized. Maybe easier to just phone them
http://www.sso.nebraska.gov/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rodell, Sr.- Wisconsin on Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:52 pm:

I think your location is probably NW 1/4, NE 1/4, Sec. 23, T. 34 N., R. 17 W.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:56 pm:

I tried this;
Nebraska NW 114, NE 114, Sec. 23 to 34 N., R. 17 W., Jamison
It searched but came up with the NW was changed to SE and I changed the T. to "to"

Nebraska SE 114, NE 114, Sec 23 to 34 N., R. 17 W., Jamison (County but comes back different county)

I am on dial up now and was going to take 25 mins to down load map so I'll let you try. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:09 am:

NW & NE tract 114
Section 23
Township 34
Range 17 West
Keya Paha County
Nebraska
Jamison

Just a guess!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:18 am:

Yes Keya Paha county is correct, I know he lived in section 23 (I have a surveyors map from 1912) but what does the rest mean?

Is there a way to convert these surveyor coordinates into latitude and longitude?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:31 am:

It is the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 23 of Township 34 North, Range 17 West. Jamison County

Jamison County is broken into Townships, in Michigan each Township is six miles by six miles with a total Township area of 36 square miles. Each square Section is 1 mile on all sides and thus one square mile. 36 square Sections make a Township and are numbered 1 to 36. Each 1 square mile Section is broken into four quarters and in this instance your land is in the NE Quarter. Then each quarter is again broken into quarters. Your original T owner lived the NW 1/4 of that quarter. His parcel was 1320' x 1320' or 40 acres total.
I have a drawing showing the breakdown and acreage in the office and can email it to you in the morning if you would like.

Jon Crane Pe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:31 am:

NW 1/4, NE 1/4, Sec. 23, T. 34 N., R. 17 W is a U.S. public land survey legal description.

Assuming that this information is correct with respect to the location of the cabin, it means that the cabin was located somewhere within the northwest 40-acre quarter of the northeast quarter (160 acres)of section 23 (640 acres) located in the 36- square mile township described by township 34 north and range 17 west within Nebreska.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:32 am:

If the coordinates are correct a reasonably priced GPS unit will get you with in about 6 feet of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:39 am:

Use this website:

http://keyapaha.gisworkshop.com

If you put your cursor in the center of the section, you will get:

Sec: 23
Town: 34
Rng: 17W

Latitude: 42.905228

Longitude: 99.286566


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:40 am:

Your surveyors map should show that your in section 23 of township 34. Be aware every township will have a section 23. As long as you know you're in Keya Paha county, Township 34 and section 23 your within a mile of where you want to be. I'm not sure of the NW114/NE114 but they could be defining the a NW Qtr of the NE Qtr or they might be feet or rods or...

Or I could be wrong about all of it. Time to call the recorders office in Keya Paha Cty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:42 am:

Hey Erik, that's kool! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:44 am:

Using the website in my prior post, you can get the coordinates of each corner of the 640 acre section and then, using the information posted by Neil McKay, pinpoint the location of the 40 acres in question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:48 am:

Here is the 1912 plat map - you can zoom in and out, etc.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/46279/County+Outline+Map/Keya+Paha+County +1912/Nebraska/

Location is south of the Keya Paha river.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 01:06 am:

Looks like your T traveled on Brocksburg Rd and was about a mile sw of a school and just south of the river. Looks like maybe a ditch went through the property to the river.

The internet is unbelievable. I would have waited two weeks to order in the plat maps, section maps etc when I started my career 40 years ago. Now I'm looking at a county map 1000 miles away in minutes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 01:17 am:

I think it's impressive that through the networking that can be done on the Internet on sites like these and with the resources available, well... I always thought, if I'd have had a modern scientific calculator like the one I've got on my cell phone back in 1965, I could have ruled the world. Or well anyway, people would have been impressed. But then they'd have probably taken it away to study it and I'd be back to being a high school student that wanted to sneak out and have a smoke and maybe take a chance at getting Diane Olson to...

It's really gettin late.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 04:26 am:

You guys are way smarter then me, thank you.

Here is a picture of the land he owned, last name is Fickewiler (or Fickweiler) depending on what I read.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 04:31 am:

His log cabin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 04:40 am:

This is incredible. By using the tools feature of that website you can look at structures at the location entered and look what I found.



I believe this is Mr. Fickweiler log cabin. The coupelet needs a trip back to it's roots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 06:31 am:

What little I find indicates a birthdate around 1866 and immigrated from Germany directly to Nebraska. He may have been a homesteader (Homestead Act, 1863).

He shows up on the 1930 census as William Fickweiler. On the 1910 census he is listed as "Willy Fickweiler." On Ancestry.com he has a few other spellings, and had a hired man around 1910 with the last name of Buell.



(Message edited by Rob on November 21, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 09:20 am:

That 40 acre within other 40 acre multiples is interesting, and since we are on history...maybe Jon knows, then maybe what John offered as explanation is a derivative.

There was a time when the US government gave 40 acres to a Veteran simply on a request. My gr gr something was one of the founders of Piqua Oh and a vet of 1812. He then took his 40 acres and started migrating west. The beauty of this entitlement was that when you farmed, and if the land played out, you could just turn your deed in to the local federal guy...he would give you a warrant for another 40 acres, and you could just go homestead somewhere else from start. All over again.

I have the paper trail of all of the land grant properties the gr gr used, turned in, and got new ones continuing to head always exactly due west...until my gr grandmother came along and said the heck with this prairie stuff and her and husband plopped themselves in a settlement that was becoming Minneapolis St Paul

I wonder if the territories were platted in 40 acre blocks because of the government veteran grants...or....the government came up with 40. Acres. Because that had some meaning in the art of surveying? Anyone know?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 09:22 am:

Phillip

How did the Coupelet survive the scrap drives and end up in California? Who, when and where did you purchase it?
Positively has to get home for a photo in front of Willy's cabin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 09:35 am:

Philip -- The plat you posted shows the property belonged to Wm. Fickwiler, but the cabin noted in the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 was the residence of Albert Juels. Maybe more research can come up with some info about Albert, in case you're interested in that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 09:40 am:

If you want to continue your adventure in historic documentation and tie the 16 coupelet to the log structure, work to have it listed as part of the historic registration and documentation project. So often historic preservationist forget that the automobile was an important part of the historic landscape.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 11:00 am:

Cherry Hill George
You are correct about the veterans receiving land grants. Lebanon Ohio was reportedly settled by veterans of the war of 1812. They received land grants. Did not know about the provision of turning in your land grant for another. Anyway, the amount of land granted was apparently based upon your military rank. Captains received more acreage than privates. In addition it was not unusual for an entire army group to settle one area, and following the military rank in acreage and prosperity into civilian life. If anybody gets to Lebanon Ohio be sure to have lunch at the Golden Lamb restaurant.

George - I spent a lot of time in Bridgeton area. My brother in law, Walt Fogle, of Bridgeton has a T too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 12:49 pm:

"Section" division and sub-division dates back to the earliest days of American history (1780's). By using 640 acre tracts, one mile by one mile tracts were surveyed, and in places like Nebraska, future roads, farms, etc. subdivided based on section surveys. In Nebraska, the first Homestead Act recipient was Daniel Freeman, near Beatrice Nebraska:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homestead_National_Monument_of_America

Earlier I listed the hired man as a Buells, however, as Mike Walker wrote, it was Albert Juels.

A little more about the homestead act, as settlers moved west into less inhabited and harsher land (such as Nebraska), 1/4 sections were given to homesteaders, and alternating whole sections to railroad companies who would build railroads through the region, helping create economies for the area. By western Nebraska, more and more sections had to be deeded to railroads (and school districts) to induce building of railroads into the lands. Then, once farms/ranches were established, railroad companies could sell off the alternating sections to offset their initial investment. All in all, a good way to open up unsettled areas in a relatively short period.

Kenya Paha county is a western, arid county in western Nebraska. For an early settler to make a go of it on a 1/4 section is a real testament to their hardiness and determination.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 01:24 pm:

And, that's why only a Ford ModelT could be used in that environment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 03:06 pm:

Great investigating, thanks again to all. This is so interesting.

Here is the whole story:

My grandfather purchased the coupelet on December 31st 1953 from a Mr. Gill of Stuart NE. He purchased the coupelet from the estate sale of William Fickweiler in 1940 or 41. When my g'pa purchased the coupelet it was a big deal for a small town so the local newspaper wrote an article about the purchase and the car, I have that article.

In 2012 my mother gave me the coupelet to preserve and get running again. I live in California so that's where the car is today.

It states that Mr. Fickweiler was a rancher from Brocksburg Nebraska. He purchased the coupelet after seeing it at a Ford dealership while it was waiting to be delivered to a doctor (don't ask my how all that happened). The article said that Mr. Fickweiler drove the car everywhere.

I believe that Albert Juels was Fickweilers hired hand. I came across some information regarding this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 03:16 pm:

I wish I had that history on my T's. I can go back to th 60's on the sedan and pre-60's on the touring. The speedster goes all the way back to 2011. I haven't done it yet but, it's my intent to write down what I know and put it in the folders with the titles and hope they stay together. I'm 65 yrs old now and might only have another 50 or 60 years to go so I'm probably going to have to get to it purtty soon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 04:13 pm:

An excellent read regarding the land divisions and basis of the same is Measuring America by Linklater


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 01:28 am:

Today I called the Nebraska State Historical society and the guy I talked to was happy to share what information they had.

Here's another picture of the cabin.



He also gave me an article for the history of Keya Paha county which tells of colorful figures from that time. Mr. Fickweiler was one of them, it even mentions the model t. In the article it stated he bought a 1914 model t that was enclosed and that he took good care of it. Around 1940 or so Ford wanted to buy it back and give him a new car and he refused it.

Another note that is interesting is that Mr. Fickweiler's sister was murdered in 1895. From what I can ascertain from the information I've found she was going to testify against local vigilantes and they got to here before she could testify. She was hanged and assaulted according to the article. I can't tell if anyone was convicted. His sisters murder brought him to Brocksburg from South Dakota, he never left. He had over 700 acres prior to his death.

Do you think if Ford sent Mr. Fickweiler a letter a copy would be on record at the Henry Ford museum?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 09:09 am:

I have heard urban legend tales about Ford wanting to buy back a Model T. There may be some validity to the story, or the tail many be a marketing ploy to have folks trade their Model T for a new Model A. Send a letter to the Henry Ford and inquire. If you do write to the Henry Ford ask if the Model A was marketed by asking folks to trade in their Model T?


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