'25 Passenger Door 'Patch Panel'?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: '25 Passenger Door 'Patch Panel'?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

Does anyone know of a vendor that has a 'door bottom' patch panel for the '25 coupe? The skin itself is salvageable, but the inside of the door's angle support and door bottom need replacing. Or do I need to make my own?
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 12:16 pm:

Marv, I sold Tom Miller up in Detroit area 3 sets of 25 coupe doors and they where all nice doors, I am sure he would be glad to get rid of one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 12:36 pm:

Thanks, Joe.
The doors are sound overall, except the flat bottom of the passenger door being 'good for Sunday driving... It's Holy!' I've got the total body off the chassis, with interior supports to keep things aligned. I've been told not to put the body on a rotisserie, or to remove the doors, as things won't fit the same after doing that. So total door replacement isn't planned, just that bottom panel & angle support.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 01:58 pm:


quote:

I've been told not to put the body on a rotisserie, or to remove the doors, as things won't fit the same after doing that.



Nonsense. Most bodies are about as stiff as package ribbon but it depends on what you're doing. It's true that you should have the body on a jig or flat chassis if you're doing major panel replacement/repairs but the coupe is probably the stiffest model Ford made. And all the body mounts are on the same plane--Flat!

Where most run into problems is putting a straight body on a bent frame. And they are almost ALWAYS bent. They'll sag from about the rear engine pan mounts to the rear running board bracket. They can also be skewed (one rail ahead of the other) and spread at the front cross member. Start with a straight frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 02:16 pm:

Marv,
Ken is correct on the body moving to fit what ever it sets on. I have rewooded several coupes and fordors and the best thing is to start with a good straight frame and let the body relax on it for a time before adjusting any hinges to fit the body frame. The panels that they sell for the bottom of doors are for a tudor and you can cut them to make them fit. I may have a panel in the barn, before I got out and beat the bush for some really nice doors I was going to fix my old ones. I do have the plan for new wood, compliments of Ron Buckley!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

When I restored my 24 T Coupe I jacked up the body off of the chassis and rolled the chassis out from under it.

I then straightened and repaired the frame, rebuilt the engine and driveline. I then put it back together and rolled it under the body.

I did it this way to keep the body as stiff as possible. I had earlier replaced some of the wood structure and some other wood body repairs.

I didn't take the doors off until I put the body back on the frame.

Model T wood framed bodies are fairly stiff but I would try to keep things stiffened up and not forget that it is a wood structured body and not steel when your working on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, November 22, 2015 - 03:59 pm:

-Ken, Joe & John-
Thanks for the input! Am still wondering if patch panels are available.
I've already done substantial re-wooding & wood reinforcing. BEFORE lifting off the body, there's also anchored-down rectangular tube and angle iron reinforcement, from each top of 'B' pillars across to opposite frame level, plus from foot-angle back to rear member, all secured top-to-bottom and then welded the 'cage' together. Doors closed & tied shut, then lifted the body off the chassis onto a plumb cart. Placement/re-install of body on the new frame is when I'll be able to get at the door, so that's still weeks away. Thanks.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 06:31 am:

Marv,

I sent a PM with my contact information. Let me know if I can be of any help.

Joe,

Seriously? Three sets? I think it was five doors total. At the time you were amazed I fit them all into a Ford Taurus.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Day on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 04:41 am:

A straight frame is a solid foundation, but to dial a body in, the use of shims between the frame and the wood will 'dial' minor fitment issues.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George D. Ralston on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 08:47 am:

http://www.fordor.com/category.cfm?startrow=21&action=prev&dept=0927modelt&cat=1 926%201927%20Ford%20Model%20T%20Coupe%20Parts&sort=title


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George D. Ralston on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 08:55 am:

These are on Ebay, now. http://www.ebay.com/itm/1926-1927-Model-T-Coupe-2-Dr-Sedan-Outer-Door-Patch-/301 574341878?hash=item46373b44f6:g:bI0AAOSw9mFWLjWU


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 10:40 am:

-George-
Thank you for the links. Didn't see any panels that I can use, and they list for '26-'27. 'Cranky' is a '25. The area I need to repair is at a 90 degree angle to the outside of the door skin, at the bottom of the door, and normally contains three drain holes. Unfortunately, there is a 'hole' lot more than that, but the outside skin is solid. I don't think it would be too difficult to fabricate my own patch panel using my metal-brake.
Marv


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