Installing new spindle bushings!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Installing new spindle bushings!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jimmie Rodgers on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 10:18 pm:

What size, style,shape,length, etc. do I need?
What else should I know before I start on my nice 26 Tudor?
I am new to this forum.
Thanks, Jimmie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 10:33 pm:

Welcome to the affliction. Get yourself a shop manual&read it while waiting for the various suppliers to send you a catalog. They all carry pretty much the same stuff and front spindle bushings are in there. Ask plenty questions as you need to.We have all been there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 10:49 pm:

Jimmie: You just opened a big can of worms. There is a lot to learn.
#1 Have you the new parts< have you sturdy jacks or supports? These are important. BE SAFE!!!!
Get a parts book,CATALOG of parts. My choice is Langs in Mass. There are certain tools you should have to the work. A removal, an installing tool, and new parts, and long with that a reamer. for the new spindle bolts... The fun starts.
I have to say WELCOME to the T affliction, as I see by your profile you have 2 T's. Just like me I have two (2), at 19 touring and a 17 Depot Hack.
Check around your area and you may find someone that has the tools and will help you with the installation. The person that you bought the cars you have may be of some help. Good luck and have fun, but as I said "BE SAFE"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 11:17 pm:

Here's what you need first, especially the Axle book: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, November 23, 2015 - 11:18 pm:

Oh, something else you should know: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG79.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 01:01 am:

Do be aware that, unless the parts have been changed, the replacement spindle bushings are usually too large and can/will crack the spindle if forced in without being fitted. I chuck them in my lathe and turn them down so the press fit is only .001 or so. This is plenty to keep them from turning in the spindle, but not so much as to overstress the spindle body. So, if you don't have access to such equipment, you may want to get some help for this.
Then the bushings have to be reamed to size to fit the kingpins--I actually preferred to have them honed (Sunnen hone, at a local automotive machine shop--which are becoming very hard to find nowadays!).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 04:15 am:

Make sure the axle has threads in the bottom arm. This is most important!!!. These threads are worn out on most axles. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 07:17 am:

Jimmie, welcome to the forum.

This is a big can of worms your about to open up. I couldn't agree more with Steve's suggestion of getting the books. We can answer the rest of the questions you may have. And if you are going to do it, consider doing it all to fix all the slop in the steering.

I did my front axle bushings a couple years ago, it turned into restoring the spring right out to the spindle. I fought with some used parts and bought new (spring perches mainly), and bought all new bushings, spindle bolts, steering arm bushings, steering arm yoke bolts, spring and perch bushings, spring pad, spring tie bolt. I found everything to be worn and I like to do it complete while I have it apart.

There are a couple special tools involved, and they total about $250 for the better ones out of the catalogs. I bought a couple of the cheaper ones and was able to find the expensive ones within our club and was able to borrow them. I might also suggest on buying two sets of bushings, I screwed up the first set when I cut to much off the face of them. I did not experience the over tight bushings mentioned above, but it would be good to check that too.

A couple of things I learned going along to watch for, threads in the bottom hole of the axle must be good. Watch for the play at the top hole in the axle. When you tighten the spindle bolt down, it will change the clearance between the axle and bushings, requiring some careful clearancing here with the facing tool. If you replace the steering arm bushings and bolts, they will need to be reamed to size too (adjustable reamer works best). Also, buy the bronze bushings offered, not the steel ones.

There are more in depth tools to fix the axle holes, it is really best if you can start with a good axle though. Also, there is axle twist that can be an issue too and cause funny steering and / or tire wear.

And as Steve mentioned, if this is your first T, check the endplay in the axles and the oil in the diff. There is no way to check to see what thrust washers are in the differential without disassembly, which usually turns to a full rebuild. I did this and between the front and rear axle I had about $800-900 into them. But like I said, I used a lot of new or bought better used parts, I wanted to make it as new as possible.

Last warning, not all parts available are created equal or are better and more modern. When in doubt, ask here. I bought a lot of stuff that I thought would be a good upgrade and it wasn't, or I bought original style parts when I should have upgraded and ended up doing things over again either way and spending more money.

Where are a couple threads I found related to my woes within the project.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/480272.html?1411236727

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/470488.html?1408011175

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/471883.html?1408574959

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/465921.html?1406728276

Don't use cinder blocks with the jackstands, you will get scorned on this. The correct way would be to build some wooden cribbing for the stands.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 07:51 am:

The only method that has worked for me getting the old bushings out involved tapping them with a 9/16 - 12 tap, then threading a bolt in and knock the bushing out with a punch.

When pressing the new spindle bushings in they contract and needs to be line reamed with an expensive tool from the vendors: http://www.modeltford.com/item/2713RM.aspx

Then you'll have to fit the spindle to the gap in the axle - and the axle may need some filing/machining to be square in the upper area where the spindle bushing goes and the weight of the car rests. There is another expensive tool, a face cutter for fitting the rebushed spindle to the axle: http://www.modeltford.com/item/2713T.aspx

If you want to try alternative methods you may reduce the cost for seldom used tools.. I was lucky and had new spindle bolts with an already good fit into new bushings.. Hated to press them in and loose the good fit, so I made a fixture out of a bolt and some washers to mount the bushing in the drill press as a primitive lathe, filed off enough on the outside while rotating for a slip fit into the spindle body, then checked fit in the axle - some adjustments needed, then I filed off the excess thickness easier while out of the spindle, without any face cutter. Final assembly involved some epoxi to get the bushings fixated while the king pins held them in line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philippe BROST, France on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 08:51 am:

The holes in the spindles for the bushing are tapered, oval and not aligned. This was for my 1914 T.
You absolutely need the special reamer. I didn't have it and I spent a lot of time with a lathe, a milling machine and a lot of tools


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 09:01 am:

Yes, Philippe, that's why I let the spindle bolt align the bushings and had some epoxi to fill up the small distance to the tapered and unaligned holes in the spindle body :-)

But there are always many ways to reach a result and your mileage may vary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 09:27 am:

Jimmie,

It sounds like you're not even sure what kind of bushing you need. Here it is, available from Lang's or any of the other suppliers....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 10:18 am:

The entire weight of the Model T front is on the top 2 spindle bushings so I ream the face of the bottom 2 bushings to fit in the front axle 'yoke'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 10:41 am:

I'll second what chad said about using bronze perch and spring bushings. There are guys with great purist reputations who preach and practice being original, but use the bronze bushings. (I don't know why the dealer catalogues call them brass.)




Spring and perch bushings may need a reamer to make the shackles fit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 01:51 pm:

Jimmie the most important answer to your post is the first one in the long run! If your new to Model T's do as Jack D. and others have stated get the Ford service manual.

Put it next to your chair when you watch TV to keep it handy and look at it and read it! It will teach you along with the MTFCA club repair manuals that are specific to different aspects of a T.

As you become more aquainted with your car and this forum you will begin to see how important it is to have those manuals that will show you what NOT to do before you tare into you cars innards! They will save you much grief as others will tell you.
Welcome and good luck!


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