Here is the Depot Hack I bought yesterday

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Here is the Depot Hack I bought yesterday
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 02:19 am:

I bought this 23 yesterday, got home at 3.30am. Gave it a wash today and squeezed it in the garage.
Its been in storage for 8 yrs following owners passing. I got my speedster from the same estate a few months ago and it only took a fuel & carby clean so I'm hoping the Hack will just take the same amount of work, fingers crossed.
I'm guessing its a NZ built body? Anybody confirm its not an American design?
Thanks Guys
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Buckley on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 02:24 am:

Congrats Kevin. Now you have 3 in the shed. Looks nice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 02:31 am:

Thanks Keith I happy with it so far and will be even more when I have it running. The old fella had several T's but chose this one to drive the most often so I'm hoping it will run well. Took some getting in the garage by myself but I learnt the hard way when pushing the speedster in a few months ago so I managed to use the tractor to square it up and simply roll off into the garage.
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 04:59 am:

Kevin, have someone who knows his timbers look at the body. He should be able to tell you the timber used in its construction, and that in turn should tell you its origin. The grain structure looks highly figured, making it quite unique.

Hope this helps.

Allan from over the dutch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 05:32 am:

Might be a modern built body - looks a bit heavy in the roof timbers, so you may have to keep the speed down in tight corners. But you already have a speedster for the fast trips while this one can bring the whole family to the beach :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 06:23 am:

WOW, that is some highly figured wood. It looks fantastic! The whole hack looks great.

Only problem is the steering wheel is on the wrong side, LOL.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jason macintyre on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 06:31 am:

Wow,I would have thought that Volvo would be too light of a tow vehicle? Although your hack is beautiful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 06:38 am:

At first glance the timber reminds me of Australian Sheoak...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Jason, here in Sweden we use Volvos to pull just about everything without much trouble. Recommended max trailer weight varies between 4000-4400 lbs for the S80 depending on model year/generation. Only the 1.6 l driv-e high mpg diesel version pulled significantly less weight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 09:35 am:

I think the body was built in Oklahoma. It's a "Surrey with the fringe on top."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 - 04:17 pm:

Actually I'm surprised how light it seems. 3 of us pushed it out of a hay shed over grass and up the ramps onto the trailer. Didn't have to get my electric winch out.
The springs are a bit soft as when you stand on the running board she leans over a fair bit so yes Roger no high speed cornering. Might have to get the springs done.
Not sure on the timber used but I think it is the way he's stained it that gives it that unusual effect but I will ask around Alan.
Jason the Volvo is the one of the best tow cars I've owned and I've had a dozen or so. Its a twin turbo v6 and gets over 35 mpg when empty, about 28 mpg towing the trailer empty but has the ability to tow very heavy loads. I had a very strong side and sometimes head wind carting the hack home which made the Volvo work, temp never rose and still got 16 mpg. (That's us gallons). It's interesting how some guys put a huge gas guzzling multi ton rig on the front of their trailer. Remembering our petrol is about $8.50 per US Gallon so economy is a major factor.

Chad I agree, my Coupe is LHD, each style has an advantage.

Two questions Guys -
1. I jacked the rear up and put on stands yesterday, took the plugs out and put a dribble of oil in each cylinder then cranked it over about 30 times. I noticed a squaky/grindy noise and using a bar to my ear I believe its the rear of the generator. I'm guessing rear generator bearing. I'll remove the Genny to do a comparison once I have it running. Is this common following long term storage?
2. How accurate a compression test can be had via cranking? I held the tester in the hole with one hand and cranked slowly with the other, each cylinder read about 35 psi. It feels like good compression when the plugs are in so I'm hoping the reading isn't accurate due to the slow hand cranking.
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 12:04 am:

Beautiful Hack you got there Kevin, but methinks the fringe will have to go. Hope it runs well for you without a lot of repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 03:01 am:

Maybe the generator bearing is bad, maybe it's just the brushes in the generator making a noise? Oil the rear bearing and try driving the car for a few miles, then you can check the compression again - hopefully the rings loosens up and it shows a better compression.

When checking compression you should remove all the spark plugs so you can hand crank it fast, then remember to have the throttle fully open.
If you haven't got a compression meter that screws into the spark plug hole, then you may want to have a helper that holds the meter to the head while you stem wind the crank :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 03:23 am:

Thanks Roger, that was a concern as I did it by myself. Couldn't crank very fast while holding the tester in the hole. Had throttle full open and all the plugs out.
Might take your advice and oil the rear bearing & run it awhile first.
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 07:52 am:

Kevin, although I was just giving a good ribbing on the right hand drive, I really wish I had one. I have a Canadian touring turned pick up, but it is still LHD. I think it would be awesome to have a right hand drive car here in the states.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 03:31 am:

No probs Chad.
Redone the compression check today after installing a battery. Got up to 42 to 48 psi but I noticed it would increase slightly each test so after I get it running for a bit I'll retest.
NH off today and cleaned plus fuel tank out and have Vinegar in it for the next few days.
I notice the copper fuel line is a larger pipe except at the ends where it attaches to the carby & the tank where it is the normal size. Is there an advantage having a larger Dia line? remembering its a 23 with under seat tank. I'm going to fit a fuel tap at the Carby so I might make up a new fuel line, what size should I go for?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 09:48 am:

I use 5/16" line for my fuel plumbing. Might be 8mm on your end of the world. I am not sure what Ford used, something tells me 1/4", but I think it is just too small for a larger T engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 10:31 am:

Chad, having an RHD car here creates some complications, but can also be a source of fun. When my wife and moved back here from Holland, we brought a 1936 English Austin Ten sedan with us. I quickly learned that if I was alone in the car, the only way to do a drive-up ATM (or anything else) was to stop the car, get out, and walk around to the left side. Although it's rarely an issue in an antique car, passing can also be a problem when you're alone in the car because you have to pull into the oncoming lane before you can see if anyone is coming.

On the other hand, we drove the car from the east coast to the midwest and we got some very startled reactions from people passing us if I was driving (on the right side of the car) and Anja was either napping or reading next to me. People thought the driver was asleep and the passenger was looking at the road. :-)


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