1926 Model T Touring

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1926 Model T Touring
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren on Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 10:33 pm:

I am purchasing a 1926 Model T touring this weekend for my wife as a birthday present. She has wanted a Model T for years and now she is going to have one. The car I am buying is a bit of a project (which I am looking forward to). I am in the early stages of researching exactly what I will need to do to the car to get it running and driving good. Here's my only fear....We live on a dirt road with a very steep hill. Would we be absolutely Stupid to drive an old T down and up the hill? My thought is to keep it at the closest storage facility and drive the car over, take the T out for a drive, then drive our car back home. It would be a bit more of a pain to work on it not having it at home but I don't want to kill myself if it stalls out going up the hill or if I lose the breaks going down the hill. Any thoughts?
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

Mike, how do you handle your 1926 coupe that is listed on your profile? I think I would want my car close so I could look at it and work on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 12:46 am:

Well from here its hard to give advice but I would not hesitate driving my T up or down any steep hills that I would go on with a modern car. Would I go a little slower and use a bit more caution? Yes

Now, make sure you get some experience with the car first and know your limitations. In that case your plan has some merits. Sooner or later after getting all the mechanicals into proper working order you'll want to tackle that hill and I don't think you'll be called stupid.

Have fun and be careful. Hope the wife likes her present!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 04:57 am:

The emergency brakes are effective on a standard 1926/27 T, so if you're trained to always reach for the emergency brake in an emergency, then you shouldn't have to fear sudden failing driveline components when driving up to or down from your hilltop home :-)

And of course, any unknown Model T should be checked inside the rear axle and drive shaft so it hasn't got fail prone babbitt thrust washers and so the pinion bearing sleeve hasn't got any cracks - brass thrusts and Fun Projects pinion bearing are recommended (if you can't find any good original Hyatt pinion bearing - and they're getting really scarce)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 07:12 am:

I have '26 Touring that I've put some work into to make it a good driver. Plenty of steep hills up here in northern WI. Just drive like it you're supposed to ( go down the hill in the same gear you drove in in and close down the throttle) and you'll be fine. Provided you have a good rear end. As for brakes, I put and equalizer and better brake shoes on my car. The service brakes kick in before the transmission band, however when going down a hill I rarely use them, I just close the throttle and let the engine slow me down. One period modification you might seriously want to consider is a Ruckstell rear axle. They are great for hills, but do take a little practice to learn how to shift them correctly. Good luck and enjoy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren on Friday, November 27, 2015 - 07:01 pm:

Thanks guys for the advice. My profile said 1926 Model T Coupe however I never ended up getting that particular car. I was within days of getting it and decided against it and chose to find a touring in order to have extra seats for passengers. I forgot to remove it from my profile...

I agree that once we get used to driving it, the hill shouldn't be an issue. I think that we may put the car in a local storage unit and drive it from there until we are really comfortable driving it. I am making the trip tomorrow to pick the car up. It is a project that someone else started and just needs to be finished. My hope is to work on it over the winter and have it ready to go by late spring. It doesn't need too much, most of the body work has been done, it just needs paint and re-assembly. As far and the mechanical end of things, I'll need to make a list of "to do" items and check/replace any worn out parts. I am really excited about this project. I'll post pics of the car on Sunday after we pick it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 10:13 pm:

Here is the new Model T. It is a 1926 touring. I have a new interior kit and most of the pieces to make it whole again. I do need some misc. parts like headlights, coils, battery, and a few other parts.

My plan is to get some heat in my garage and work on it over the winter. I'm going to start from the ground and work up. New tires, rebuild the rear axle, finish stripping and painting the frame, get the motor running, then tackle the paint on the body last.

Anyone in the Vermont area have a 1926/27 Model T Touring? I'm sure I'll have plenty of questions for you...



On the trailer ready for the 5 hour ride homeMy wife right after she saw the car for the first time


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 11:46 pm:

Don't worry about that hill. If it's so steep that the car struggles going up or gains speed going down, just mash down the low pedal. The low gear on a T will let you crawl up or creep down some mighty steep hills.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 02:00 am:

Looks great - I would advise you against ever sand blasting if you might be thinking that route - it's a pain... I'm just finishing up 10 years of work on my 26 roadster that was a sandblast basket case... Your idea of getting it all put together first and fitted is a big+.


Good luck, let me know if you have any questions


Travis
Topeka, Kansas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 08:44 am:

Put RM's on it and use them and low gear when going down the hill. We have plenty of steep hills here in TN including my driveway and I have no problems with my T's going up or down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 08:46 am:

Travis,

The body parts that you see in primer have already been blasted and re-welded. The person I bought it from said it was a HUGE pain in the ass to repair...

Thankfully, that work is all done. The yellow aprons and fenders still need some attention. They appear fairly solid but we'll see once I get them stripped down. The body is just bolted with a few bolts to hold it in place for now. My plan is to take the body off, and start with the chassis. He primed the whole chassis but I'm not sure I like the way it came out...Looks like I'll redo some of the work he did. I'm just now starting to research how to go about repairing/replacing all the internals of the rear end/drive axles/drive shaft. Is there anywhere online that would show an "exploded view" diagram of the parts that make up the drivetrain?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 09:28 am:

There's my cue. I don't know of any exploded views showing the whole drive train, but I do know what you need before you go to work on it. The Model T is fairly simple, but it does contain some surprises. Forewarned is forearmed.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 10:36 am:

Michael: Nice looking project. If you want to identify all your cars parts as to early 26 late 26 or 27 models. Let me know. There are lots of little details as to the time frame of build. To some people it does not matter, and others want everything as correct as possible. One example is the headlights you mention needing. The early 26 lights are mounted on a stem and no headlight bar. then they were changed to stem mount with a bar bolted under the stem, and finally they changed to the headlights being mounted directly to the bar with one bolt. Main thing is to have fun.... Donnie Brown ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 11:06 am:

Michael, I live at the end of a very steep road 200' (change in elevation). I have identified the turn outs so that If my '16 touring is below a couple gallons of gasoline and starves for fuel on the way up, I can whip it around and finish the climb to my house in reverse. I understand this driving technique was de rigueur during the day. Going down I keep it in low, both ears up and stab the brakes a few times to keep things under control. I don't think you would have any problem with your '26.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, November 30, 2015 - 11:41 am:

Start looking for a Ruckstell!


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