Model T sat for 3 weeks - now has no power in high gear - help!

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Model T sat for 3 weeks - now has no power in high gear - help!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lyndel butler on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 09:40 am:

Model T was running fine about 3 weeks ago. Pulled it in the garage and parked it (for about 3 weeks) and all was well. Got it out a couple of days ago and it has no power in high gear but will idle ok. I'm new to the Model T world. Any advice would be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 09:44 am:

Needs more gas. Below 3 gallons is empty as far as I am concerned.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 11:26 am:

Do you have a standard roller timer? Sometimes timer problems shows more when getting into high gear. Try cleaning it out and oil it often (if it is a timer that should be oiled)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 01:14 pm:

Yeah, what Royce and Roger said. _The more gas you have in the tank, the higher the fuel pressure and below a certain level, the engine is just not as happy. _Also, the quality of today's gasoline is just dismal, with a comparatively short shelf-life. _A steady diet of Star-Tron dosing works wonders for keeping the gas fresh in my car.

And yeah, that stupid roller-timer: _A big part of the charm of these old cars is doing things the old-fashioned, obsolete way and the Model T's thoroughly outmoded ignition system is part of the warp-and-woof of what makes the Tin Lizzie a Tin Lizzie. _For me, it works best if I put a few drops of ordinary motor-oil in the timer every other day I drive the car. _And as often as I fill the gas tank (and add the aforementioned dose of Star-Tron), I dismount the timer shell and give it a good cleaning. _I gently dab at the delicate roller itself with a Q-tip to clean it without hurting anything and then spray it and the inside of the housing liberally with WD-40. _Yeah, I know using that stuff is heresy among real mechanics, but WD-40 is non-conductive and unlike petroleum lubes, doesn't attract grit and grime, so it gives me a little delay before the timer gets glopped up with the black, metal-infused engine oil that always seeps past my two seals (modern and felt) and the brass shield.

I've learned from experience (meaning mistakes from which I took forever to learn) that when the engine is running a little bit rough, it's probably just time to stop at the gas station—and when the engine is really running badly (and I'm talking Chevy Vega badly, here), 99.9% of the time, it's because of that stupid timer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

Obviously Bob has never driven or rode in a Model T that runs right with its original and trouble free roller timer. Accept no substitutes - the Ford or old stock Tiger or Bull Dog brand roller timers are indestructible and very low maintenance, while giving flawless performance.

There are reproduction roller timers available today that are unlikely to last even 100 miles. I don't know how the manufacturer can sell a product that is so pitiful.

That being said, if the car idles OK it is possible - but not likely - the timer is faulty. Typically if the timer is dirty or worn the first symptom is rough idle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 06:40 pm:

I got my '27 on the cheap because the seller could not get it started. He had 2 gallons of gas in the tank. On the way home I stopped at a gas station, put 5 gallons of gas in the tank while it was on the trailer and when I got home I pulled up on the crank 2 times and it started on compression when I turned on the switch. It has been running ever since! Cars with gravity feed systems need a minimum amount of gas to run right and that varies from car to car for some reasons. One of my T's will run the tank dry without a blip but others need 3 gallons or more. I don't know why that is but assume it has something to so with the way the gas line is routed and/or the carburetor. All my cars have the tank under the seat except for the '27.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, November 28, 2015 - 06:48 pm:

Could you give more details of what you mean by "no power in high gear?" Does it run smoothly, but just doesn't have power, or does it misfire and run very roughly in high gear? Or does it feel like something is dragging like a brake being stuck? Does it also overheat? Does it start running well and then just kind of fade away until it stops? The reason I ask, is because two things have been suggested above. One is low fuel, the other is an ignition problem. More detailed symptoms will help with a diagnosis.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 04:49 am:

Lyndel, try draining the sediment bulb. Sometimes it may have almost too much water/sediment in it when you last ran it. After setting for three weeks, it may have drawn enough moisture to cause problems. That's what the sediment bulb is for, separating out contaminates. You may have to push a wire or something up through the petcock to dislodge any sediment. Just a thought. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 06:48 am:

Sounds like fuel starvation to me. Had the same type of thing happen to mine. Idled fine, but when going down the road at cruising speed started to "cut out" and eventually died. The culprit was some debris blocking the fuel flow in the shut-off valve/sediment bowl. Cleaned it out and everything runs great. David is right; that would be the first place I would check out. Drain a little fuel out and put it in a small glass container as well and see if any water separates out as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lyndel butler on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 10:36 am:

It runs like you are trying to take off in high gear.No overheating or dragging brake.It starts great, and runs good in low gear only......... Thanks!!for the help .I'll try again


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 11:07 am:

Could be the fuel mixture or spark advance. In cold weather you might need a richer fuel mixture until it gets warmed up. Try different positions of the spark lever. Usually about half way down when engine is running slowly such as just after you shift to high then as it picks up speed advance farther until you find the "sweet" spot. Same goes for the fuel mixture. Try richer than lean out a bit until it starts to slow down then a little richer where it runs smoothly.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, November 29, 2015 - 11:09 am:

Model T's don't care if they sit for three weeks or three years!


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration