Kevlar bands

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Kevlar bands
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe gallagher on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 02:20 am:

Do Kevlar band linings have to be soaked in oil before being riveted on bands ... Thanks for any help .... Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 02:26 am:

I soak them over night after they are riveted on, in ATF, less mess that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 04:19 am:

Joe, I don't know that they HAVE to be soaked, but I do. Why take a chance? Darn sure can't hurt! JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 04:49 am:

If you wait with the soaking until after they're riveted you'll certainly be less oil soaked yourself :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 06:41 am:

Why use ATF? Wouldn't they be better off being soaked in the engine oil they are going to operate in? Reason I'm asking is because I just finished up installing a new set of Kevlar band material and still need to soak them overnight. Glad I caught this discussion when I did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 09:29 am:

My opinion is that it doesn't make any difference if its engine oil or ATF.
I have soaked mine in the 10W30 HD oil as I always use. Kevlar or cotton.
This gets in the debate of which engine oil to use!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 10:05 am:

I agree. Rivet, then soak. Why do it the hard way?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 10:19 am:

I find the soaking part unnecessary. Kevlar is soaked in polyester resin. It doesn't absorb anything. Install the bands, then crank the engine over once or twice. Oil will be all over them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 10:46 am:

"Kevlar is soaked in polyester resin. It doesn't absorb anything."

Where the heck did you get that info from???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 10:47 am:

"Kevlar is soaked in polyester resin."


???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 11:04 am:

Please soak your bands before riveting and then make a video of our doing the riveting. :-)

Just kidding -


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 03:09 pm:

Kevin.
Why ATF, that's the thinnest oil I've got, at our end of the world, if you have an engine that requires a 5W/30, it costs an arm and a leg to buy.
I'm sure your engine oil of choice would still work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 04:23 pm:

Jerry,

In order to keep the Kevlar cloth from unraveling it is impregnated with a resin, typically an epoxy or polyester.

There used to be a soft Kevlar cloth band available for Model T's, that was not impregnated. Those had a tendency to unravel and shred in the Model T transmission, especially in the presence of a new driver who slips the low band too much when starting out. I have not seen any of those in the past ten years so maybe they are no longer being made, which is a good thing.

The hard as a rock Kevlar bands now being sold are pretty good if the driver knows not to slip the band much. The new hard Kevlar bands will cause drum wear if the driver is abusive. The Kevlar band is tougher than cast iron. You are trading band wear for drum wear when you use a Kevlar band instead of any other material. I am willing to make that trade.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 04:24 pm:

O.K., you mean at the ends?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 04:54 pm:

Yes, you can see the coating on the ends of these new ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, December 02, 2015 - 05:22 pm:

As long as it doesn't make much difference, I'll just soak them in my normal 10W-40 motor oil. I have more of that than ATF on hand anyways.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 11:34 am:

soak your bands if it makes you feel better. I never do because running your engine for five minutes after installation does the job. They didn`t soak new bands when assembling engines at the factory, as far as I know---paul


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