Old Photo - Cozy Cabins For The 1920's Motorist

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Cozy Cabins For The 1920's Motorist
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 11:17 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

Cabins named by "State" ? Pretty snappy hair-do on the gal leaning on the T !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

Those cabins look barely big enough for a person to lie down in. I'd say "cozy" is an understatement. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 12:59 pm:

Early start to the current Tiny House craze.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 01:04 pm:

Another great photo!

I guess if your too tall to lay down you just open the door and let your feet hang out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 01:59 pm:



Petty lawsuits weren't invented yet. Look at the drop off on both sides of the sidewalk. People were actually expected to look where they were walking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 02:30 pm:

John,
I doubt the stoop and step into the house meet current standards. That door certainly would not accommodate a wheelchair either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 02:41 pm:

Hey, this is the five star version. The really old ones had the Smicht house out back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 03:33 pm:

That's probably "brick" siding, made of roofing material with a brick pattern on it--might even contain that "non-conforming fibrous binding material" in it. Those cabins are about the right size, looks like the same size as the cabins at my family's resort (built in 1923).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 04:56 pm:

There used to be a number of homes that were built in rural areas that had siding material that resembled bricks. Some in older - poorer sections of Minneapolis also. I do believe that the buildings in the photo are actually mason brick. Look at the corners. The pattern indicates real brick. The buildings look well built and show quality materials and workmanship. Look at the roofing. Excellent materials and work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 05:52 pm:

People didn't have much stuff to haul when they traveled in those days. It didn't take much room to spend the night. Those are probably 12 x 12 -- look to be very well built and pretty stylish along with it.

I've lived in smaller places than that and a lot worse places than that.

You should see some of the "band houses" the bars provide for musicians playing there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 06:17 pm:

I would venture to guess that the floors may be a concrete slab. Elevated on small piers for ventilation and help with mold problems. Termites are also a problem in the deep south. When we lived in south Arkansas, most of the older homes were on small piers. The chickens could run under the house and it helped keep the ticks and other bugs out of the house. Insulation and freezing is not a worry, but mold and bugs are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 06:40 pm:

notice how each bungalow is named after a state, no "room numbers" back then!
As I recall, the bedrooms in the cabins area bout 12x12 and then there is a "kitchen" and a bathroom attached to that, sharing the 12' width, and less than 12" deep, maybe 8' making the whole cabin 12x20, with a maybe 8' porch on the front. Originally built on rocks & railroad ties.
The foundation under that front cabin doesn't look substantial enough for bricks, which is why I suspected the faux siding, even though the pattern is correctly matched at the corner. Donnie may have something though, concrete pad; after all the door stoop is concrete, as are the sidewalks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 06:59 pm:

I thought it was brick at first, but now I don't think so. It's not a slab; the height of it to the floor is right for floor joists. And the "bricks" (siding) are overhanging the joists a bit -- no one would lay bricks like that. The window and door would be inset farther if it were brick.

What are those ring-looking things hanging from the eave above the car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 07:33 pm:

One of those and a twenty car insulated garage is all I need (and all the cars and parts and tools I have to go in it).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Thursday, December 03, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

I vote for masonry, I believe the JM siding had a corner finish piece. Dave in Bellingham< WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 12:29 am:

Those are ladies of the evening taking a break between "Johns" I think the one with glasses is actually Smoking!!!!!!!! she is such a tart look at the short length of her skirt compared to the other working woman.The reason the cabins are so small is they only need room for a double bed and corner sink. Open the door fall in the bed do the deed a quick wash up and back on the road. I'm guessing the johns did not have to even turn their Fords off.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 12:43 am:

The hooks under the eave are the incoming power/coms strikes. If you look carefully,
you can make out the glass insulators and wires heading off, stage right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 01:19 am:

I remember staying in a cabin similar to that in the late 1930s. As I remember, it cost my dad $1.00 for the night. There were 7 of us ages 3 -11 plus Mom and Dad. We owned a 1936 Dodge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Murray - Anacortes, WA on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 01:22 am:

They look a lot like the new "mini-pods" for the next Nickelsville homeless encampment, named after a former mayor of Seattle.


tt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 02:13 am:

Hal, when I was a kid, about 12 (so this would have been about '65) I remember renting cabins for $3.50 a night, trailer spaces were 75 or $1.00, I don't remember.
Also, Motel 6 and Super 8 Motels were named that because that was the cost of a room, "super 8s" were supposed to be an upgrade from the motel 6 (That's why they called them "Super").
BTW, One of my funniest memories was showing cabin 17 to a "city slicker" lady (she was dressed to the hilt). She asked, "Is the river always this noisy?" Uh, gee, most people like that sound--I didn't have enough quick-wit to say, "Oh, don't worry, you can't hear the river over the trains." But I should have!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen -- Ham Lake, MN on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 03:10 am:

I'm with Dave Sullivan. The old "Depression Brick" wall treatment had corner pieces that were installed on top of the siding. Wasn't that many years ago that you'd see someone asking the home improvement editor or equivalent where they might find some of that material because they had a "couple of spots and a corner or two" that could use some touching up but they hated to re-side the whole house. I don't see it so much anymore but once in a while you can still encounter a building that has this stuff on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 10:25 am:

I purchased a miner's house in Roslyn that was covered in that stuff. I hired some local kids to peel
it off, revealing a once-painted, very good condition original T&G siding underneath.

A whole house worth of that phony brick stuff made for a mountain of mess to clean up. To get this
whole global warming thing kicked off, it was set ablaze. The kids ran home and returned with hot dogs
and marshmallows and it only took a moment's wave over the flames to blacken them ! The kids gave
no thought to this and eat 'em right up !!!

Mmmmm ..... delicious tar dogs !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 11:12 am:

Those little motor courts are still around. We look for them when we travel. There is a great one in Chouteau, MT we stay at when ever we are there. We found one in Santa Fe, NM that had a saddle theme. Everything was a saddle or picture of one. PK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 11:23 am:

I do that, too, Pat. Have you ever stayed at the Hotel in Choteau? A great place to stay is the Crazy Mountain Inn in Martinsdale. The showplace of the town and just about the only business left, they have two rooms with private baths and the rest have the bath down the hall. I haven't stayed there for years but eat there once in awhile. Best Chicken fried steaks in Montana.

The Abbey Hotel on East Park that I owned in Butte, above Kelly-Altman Hardware (where Tony the Trader was) had 26 rooms and two large baths at the end of the hall. Private booths, 2 tubs and 4 showers in each one. One side had a private room with a sink, stool and bath for ladies only. It had a separate door from the hallway. It was a working man's hotel and I would guess the ladies was seldom used. I bought it after we had Tony's auction, cleaned it up and sold it to a guy for a Hot Tub sales operation. He did what I had intended to do with it, make storage units out of the rooms. 26 rooms @ $40 a month made the payment and then some. It is an impressive building.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

The pie at Crazy Mountain Inn is pretty darn good too. Don't recall who suggested it but we went up there last summer for lunch the day after the Montana 500 for the chicken fried steak and some pie. A bit off the beaten path but nice folks and great food.


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