Instructions to reline brake shoes

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Instructions to reline brake shoes
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bartol on Monday, December 07, 2015 - 03:33 pm:

I picked up new linings, rivets and the tool(s) to reline the brakes on my TT truck, but it did not come with instructions. Does anyone have tips to do this? My biggest concern is doing the countersink drilling (don't want to ruin the shoes).

Thanks, Chris.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Monday, December 07, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

I relined the shoes for my 1926. I have no idea if the TT relining tools are the same, but I received a drilling/countersinking tool and a riveting tool that you clamp in a vice. I secured the new linings to the shoes with welding clamps while I drilled them. Then I countersunk the holes. One has to be careful to get the right depth. Too shallow and the rivets will rub against the brake drum, and too deep and there won't be much lining secured against the shoe. I set the depth so the rivets were just under the surface of the lining.
The tool and instructions are here http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/riveting-tool

One thing I did find is the new material wants to bend away from the shoe at the ends. As there are no rivets right at the end, I had to bond the ends of the linings with Quik Steel epoxy.
When I had installed the linings without doing this, the ends rubbed against the brake drum all the time and one eventually broke off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, December 07, 2015 - 05:30 pm:

When I got some help from a local club member, we used the "drill bit counter sink" tool from Langs and the small riveter tool also. We had a few holes that snagged and went through the new material. The best thing I can take away from that experience is to build something that can support the shoe/lining, and use a drill press that has a depth stop on it.

Also just start at one end, and work your way around. After the first set of rivets, make sure you pull it tightly before drilling the next set of holes. Use clamps to hold the material to the shoe if necessary. You will be drilling the initial hole from the shoe inner sides current holes out through the lining, then countersink from the material top side.

When you get near the other end, take a piece of scrap sheet metal and put it between the lining material and shoe. Use a cut off wheel to remove the excess length. The sheet metal assures you cut through the lining only so you don't cut into the metal shoe

I also use JB weld and clamp and glue the lining ends down on the shoes---just the very ends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, December 07, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

Pick up a few extra rivets. It's pretty much a given you'll wind up with a couple that don't look quite right and you'll want to re-do correctly.


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