1913 Delivery

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1913 Delivery
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer---- Klaaswaal NL on Tuesday, December 08, 2015 - 03:57 pm:

A friend of me is building an 1913 Delivery. Now he is looking for pictures of the [front] Cuchion,the Backrest and the Firewall. He is also interested in what kind of rear fenders Henri used on the 1913 Delivery.If you have some pictures he will be very happy !!!
All the best from Holland
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, December 08, 2015 - 04:18 pm:

The only delivery cars Ford built during the T era were 1912 models. All others were aftermarket built on Ford chassis and the cushions and backrests varied. John Regan has the only two original bodied 1912 Ford "pie wagons" that has survived (?) and some pictures can be seen in older threads like this one:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/104150.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, December 08, 2015 - 04:34 pm:

Anthonie,
Unless your friend is on the small side, I would suggest making the seating position fit, rather than making it "correct". Most original Ts are cramped for modern drivers. The second van body I built like my Haighs chocolate van had the seat back moved 3" back to make it more comfortable to drive. On my 1917 shooting brake, I even made the backrest angle adjustable.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Elenbaas - Granger, Washington on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 12:57 pm:

Anthonie, I don't know if this will help you, but this is a link to my delivery building project.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/237188.html?1316925241


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 03:17 pm:

Ford sold 513 remaining delivery cars in FY 1913. They were all supposedly left over 1912 models, which would have little meaning to a customer who needed one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 04:52 pm:

Royce,
I can't quite make out what it says on the side of the delivery car??? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Brancato, Burbank CA on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 06:54 pm:

My Russian is very rusty but it looks to be an ice cream truck. Cossack Custard 1/2 Kopek. Capitalist Pig Pistachio 1 Ruble (market prices you know!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 06:56 pm:

I do recognize the word "Gargoyle" on the top line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 08:33 pm:

Constantine should be able to sort it out for us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 08:43 pm:

Oil Truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 08:42 am:

Maybe Greek? On closer inspection, that is a picture of a gallon oil can on the side of the truck, also with the Mobiloil Gargoyle logo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 10:25 am:

The first four Cyrillic characters under the traditional Ford delivery car decal and on the hood top spell the word "Ford". In both cases the fifth Cyrillic character has no sound and emphasizes the fourth character "D".
Notice the same Cyrillic characters on this Harbin Ford dealership sign above the building on the left.
1
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 10:27 am:

Notice too the American flag atop the building.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 11:55 am:

The last of the deliveries had the newer one piece firewall, like a late '12, and even had black and brass lights.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 02:34 pm:

I believe Royce's picture of the Delivery is in St. Petersburg sometime in May 1912(?)...don't forget Imperial Russia was using the Julian calendar which is two weeks behind.

The Imperial Russian War Department put on an endurance run of 2930 versts distance over rough roads. There were 45 entrants, Ford entered a touring and there were cars entered by White, Mercedes, Charron, Benz, Napier. The T was the only car to finish without a penalty, helped by it's light weight.

There was also a T Delivery in the run that carried oil and gas for all the entrants.

On the side of the Delivery is written "Automotive oils and grease", "Vacuum Oil Company". It's written in pre-reform Russian; again after the Revolution major changes were made to how Russian was written. This is why "Ford" is written with 5 letters in the 1912 photo, and only 4 letters in 1920s Harbin (China) photo. After the Revolution more than 100,000 defeated Russian White Guards and refugees retreated to Harbin.

In today's post 1918 modern Russian "Ford" is pronounced "FORT", in Russian the letter "D" at the end of a word is "softened" unless it's followed by the hard symbol. Pre 1918 Russian the word "Ford" did have the hard symbol at the end which kept the "D" hard. Why did the reforms get rid of most hard symbol at the end of words? Quickly say "fort" and "ford"...which is easier to say clearly and quickly?

Also note in the background of the Harbin photo there's a sign the says "Chevrolet". Ford and Chevrolet did not have dealers in Russia (USSR), again 1920s Harbin was controlled by the Republic of China until the Japanese invasion in the early 30s.


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