Spiffy Speedster Carb

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Spiffy Speedster Carb
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

Finally, today, I completed the engine as I had planned several years ago. The last part was this very spiffy no name updraft carburetor. In the last couple of weeks I finished tweaking the throttle linkage and the final rebuild of the carb. All the whacky tubes cleaned and plugs reset, made and installed a new mixing tube, reground the the main and idle needle valves.

Got it running yesterday and it was rough. Didn't really know how to adjust it. Lots of popping, smoke etc. The plugs were sooty by the time I figured out the problem. Finally looked in my old Dykes manual and adjusted the idle and main jet. As of this afternoon it idles slow and smooth .. transitions to high speeds without coughing.

Compared to the Kingston I ran for the past ten years this carb makes the car leap forward after shifting to high gear, climbs hills like a goat ... and flat out .. runs like a "turpentined dog." I was amazed. Thought I was going to need an ignition upgrade.


T engine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 06:16 pm:

Did you ever figure out what brand it is??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 06:29 pm:

No, I been looking on line for months and months. Have looked though every old model T era magazine and book I have and seen some that look a little like it ... but not exactly the same.

Have never "excavated" a carburetor before. It was an interesting puzzle to figure out what all the various chambers did. You would have figured it out in five minutes ... but it took me some time. It has a 2" air intake ... and now I'm trying to find a filter that will fit.

Here is the mixing tube replacement I made to replace the cracked original. Luckily it was just a brass tube soldered into the fitting, so easy to make.


mixing tube


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 11:03 pm:

Has anyone used the type of intake tube that has a slot that allows either fresh air ... or heated air from the manifold?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 11, 2015 - 07:49 am:

What does the Dykes manual call it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, December 11, 2015 - 08:29 am:

Dykes didn't have the exact one, but there was enough about so many other carburetors and adjustments it really helped me understand all the vents, chambers and adjusting it to work correctly. I had never rebuilt a carburetor before. Like I said ... I was amazed it worked. Then I was amazed in the difference in pick up and hill climbing.

Actually Royce ... I remember seeing you post a picture of a U & J on one of your cars that was equipped with a cast iron heat pipe. Do you still have that and was there any advantage to it's use? I know they were designed for improving the vaporizing of poor grade gas but am wondering if it would help during a Rochester winter with modern gas. I usually use premium since it's the only has here without alcohol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 11, 2015 - 09:03 am:

I took the heat pipe off because it was slowing the car down. Maybe it might help in cool wet weather. Likely it was intended to help vaporize the crappy gas available in the 1920's.

Top picture shows it on the 1915, bottom is on the '17.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, December 11, 2015 - 04:11 pm:

Yes, I would say the weather in Rochester, NY is quite different than Dallas. I'm going to see if preheating has any advantage in our winter months. Seems to me that I've seen some intake tubes with a sliding cover that allow switching from fresh cool air to heated air from the manifold.


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