OT Early Photographic Processes

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT Early Photographic Processes
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 06:21 pm:

I often see posts featuring great old images of model T Fords. At George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York I teach a series of hands-on workshops on how to make images with early photographic processes from the dawn of photography [1800] all the way up to those used during the model T era. We make everything from scratch.

So, if you would like to learn how to make a tintype of your Tin Lizzy ... or a gelatin dry plate negative for printing with collodion chloride paper ... or a developed out silver gelatin print ... ask for an unusual gift this year. A photography workshop. This year we also have destination workshops in Yucatan Mexico [shooting Mayan ruins] Kenilworth Castle in England and a workshop featuring camping and shooting dry plates in the Adirondacks.

Here is a link to the 2016 workshops:

https://www.eastman.org/events-series/Workshops


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen 40 miles west of chicago on Wednesday, December 09, 2015 - 10:52 pm:

While I cannot vouch for Mr. Osterman's classes personally, he is one of the go to guys for this kind of work. I learned Wet Plate form his book, and never looked back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 06:41 am:

Thanks Chris,

My wife and I were the first to offer wet collodion workshops back in 1995. Now there are thousands of people shooting collodion tintypes, ambrotype and negative all over the world. It's been amazing to watch the evolution of a revival over the years.

Would be fun to see someone go to a model T event and offer shooting tintypes of the cars. At one point I actually considered mounting a portable darkroom on the back of my T for shooting tintypes at events.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 07:10 am:

Can ordinary people learn to make and use dry plates? If so, there might be an interesting tie-in here with the Stanley Museum in Kingfield, Maine. The Stanley twins made dry plates before they got into steam cars. They sold that business to George Eastman. They also made violins. The Stanley Museum is often looking for other ways to interest people who may have no interest in early cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 10:03 am:

You could make a photo trailer to pull with your T. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 12:32 pm:

Is that Chaim Topol as Tevye


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 12:46 pm:

No - that is the very first celebrity photographer, Antonio Razzi, aka "Papa" Razzi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 01:11 pm:

And also, it's the first Utility Van--notice the sign! It's also up-to-date with the latest trend in narrow sidewall tires!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 10:56 pm:

Gilbert,

There is no experience necessary required to take any of our workshops. Yes, we regularly make gelatin dry plates that would pass for the Stanley Dry Plate. Always loved the graphics on their box and their motto "on Stanley on!"

We have the group make the gelatin emulsion from scratch, coat 4x5 plates, shoot them in George Eastman's garden here at the Museum and then develop the plates in our darkroom. We also teach how to make the various photographic papers from scratch. The proper paper for these dry plates would have been called "gaslight" paper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, December 10, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

Steve,

That is Roger Fenton's "photographic van" used during the Crimean War. It was used for processing wet collodion plates. We teach a workshop in making these plates ... but we do our processing in a Honda CRV. :-)


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration