Did the open cars originally have plastic windows?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Did the open cars originally have plastic windows?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

My girlfriend and I were wondering this today as we looked at getting a new top for my touring.

Were the windows originally plastic? We didn't know that clear, flexible plastic existed back then. What would they have been made of?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 12:24 pm:

They were made out of celluloid: https://www.google.se/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.m.wikipedia.org/w iki/Celluloid&ved=0ahUKEwjeqveG69bJAhUKFCwKHXzNCpoQFgggMAE&usg=AFQjCNE2Ny4RKfhBf ZdqsJaZXdqgjP6qWA&sig2=USPcnqoLlHRS9t8Jjh99nQ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harry Courtneay on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 12:30 pm:

I have always thought they were isinglass


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 12:42 pm:

noun
1.
a pure, transparent or translucent form of gelatin, obtained from the air bladders of certain fish, especially the sturgeon: used in glue and jellies and as a clarifying agent. (added by me; some beers use it as a clarifying agent)
2.
mica, especially in thin, translucent sheets.

As I recall the mica is used in stove windows and is not all that clear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harry Courtneay on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 08:46 pm:

celluloid is correct. I looked it up. I should have done that in the first place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:19 am:

It's of much better quality today, and is available in several thicknesses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel E. Snell on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:33 am:

Where may this celluloid be purchased?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:53 am:

Any boat shop...it is clear vinyl today

You can't find 'celluloid' anymore. It had a bad habit of being one of the most flammable items ever produced.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:58 am:

The side curtain drawings for my C cab specify .030" thick celluloid in case there is a question on thickness. I would guess that the cars had the same thickness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 02:10 pm:

As I understand it early windows were made of cellulose nitrate. If you try to buy it today you will likely find yourself on the No-Fly list!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 03:20 pm:

Trying to remember if early movie film wasn't made of cellulose nitrate? That's why it was so dangerous.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 04:18 pm:

IIRC it is one step away from gunpowder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 04:41 pm:

The celluloid on original side curtains is only about .012" to .015" I don't remember if I used .20" or .030" on my unzip-from-the-bottom side curtains.







: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Glowacki on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 06:26 pm:

I used to work in a musical instrument shop, the owner had a supply of original celluloid for restorations. One day he showed me just how flammable the stuff was...scary ! They used to make men's shirt collars from it...the old expression "went up like a celluloid collar" still applies


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH on Monday, December 14, 2015 - 04:24 pm:

Best source is to get some old X-rays and boil the emulsion off them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Monday, December 14, 2015 - 04:43 pm:

And who was it that invented celluloid, arguably the first "Plastic", in 1878?

Why, it was none other than our old friend, John Wesley Hyatt. Yeah, THAT Hyatt. The man that also gave us Model T owners our roller bearings.

He invented celluloid as a replacement for the (even then) quickly becoming scarce ivory that was being used in the manufacture of piano keys and billiard balls.

When it was discovered that celluloid was extremely flammable, a guy by the name of Leo H. Bakeland came up with some stuff called phenolic that was a lot less flammable but, you couldn't make movie film with it.

oh well.


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