Not to Tee anyone off, but have you noticed how funny some purist can be?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Not to Tee anyone off, but have you noticed how funny some purist can be?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 04:18 pm:

So, a fellow T guy next doors had his brother from Texas stop on his way home from Michigan hauling a car home. Seems he and his wife bought three Model A's but trailer would only haul one at a time. The car is beautiful and was shown photos of the other two which are just as beautiful.

Of course we all go out to ooh and aah and fawn over the car and to hear all the stories his wife was telling us about the other two cars. Then they went to see my neighbors cars. I went back to my garage working on building a T engine. Twenty minutes go by and here they come to my house.

The man and wife came in the garage and looked around. Said nothing, asked just one question, what year was my T coupe. Did not say a word about my A speedster or the T speedster project I was working on. After about five minutes of stand there, the man said that they better get. Have a half days drive yet to go. I felt he thought like my stuff was just trash to his cars. I have run into these guys before at AACA shows and made me laugh then also.

After a few minutes I realized an important difference between him and I. This guy is proud of his cars and rightful so. They are beautiful. However, all his cars are "Ready Made" cars. Cars that all he did to earn them was to buy them. He does not know now or will ever know the fun, the joy and the pride of taking a pile of rusty parts and making a thing of beauty.

Funny thing about me is, I discovered I too get caught up in the purist mind set also. I love speedsters and period racers. I build then after researching how they were. Then I hold that standard to others cars. But I normally catch myself and bring myself back to earth.

Sorry if I offended anyone. I have nothing against purist. Their cars are far more correct than my. I was just making a point about this guy being a ready made purist.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins / MN on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 04:48 pm:

Most people are interested in what they have and want to tell you all about it (or themselves). My feelings Are I already know what I have, I want to hear and learn what YOU have. Funny thing, that philosophy also applies to children and grandchildren too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:03 pm:

I may be an optimist, but I think that most of the "purist" observations and comments stem from an honest desire to educate a fellow hobbyist on how to make their car "better". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

Tyron,

I don't fault folks who don't have mechanical ability. They have other talents. He bought what he likes. You and I make what we like.

He probably is less of a purist than you think. The Model A clubs are full of great folks of every stripe. Some like to modify the heck out of their cars and drive them. Some like to look at their pristine restorations when they emerge from enclosed trailers.

Just like us!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:27 pm:

Tyrone, I have the same outlook on old cars. I was given a bunch of T parts plus other makes. I started with a 1916 frame and a 1916 engine and transmission. I always thought I would run into a 15-16 body; but after the engine and transmission were rebuilt I had very little money to make a purist T. For some reason, out in Utah there are not a lot of early T parts, but there seems to be quite a bit of 20's car parts. I wanted to finish my T so I decided to build something I would like and could afford. Rear end is 1926 and so is the front axle I found a 20's drive line at a swap meet. I bought a Syverson 1912 fire wall and stained it a cherry colour and trimmed it with brass. In other words I took a bunch of rusty parts and made a T. The rich purists in the club are always looking down there noses at my T conglomeration; that always makes a person feel welcome. What I like the most is that the T had interchangeable parts. I like my T and I will thumb my nose to people who do not appreciate my ingenuity to build a car that was never a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:44 pm:

About 1962 the Model A Ford Club had a national meet at San Francisco. We had at that time a 1931 Phaeton which we drove all the way there and back from San Diego. There were cars which left New York and picked up others on a tour which extended all the way across the United States. There were at least 100 cars at Golden Gate Park on display. I was parked right next to another Phaeton which came from a nearby town to San Francisco. That car was trailered in. Everything on it was perfect. As people walked along, they looked right past my car and oo'd and aa'ed about the one next to it.

Anyway, the cars were judged and the only ones which drove to the event which got any prize were for the fartherst place the car was driven from. All the ones which won awards for best were trailered in.

The irony was that some of the cars which won prizes were "restored" beyond the original specations such things as all the sand pits were ground off the head and block and the engine was painted and polished just as smooth and shiny as the outside of the car!

Anyway, I learned way back then, that the fun of having an old car is in driving it and doing as much work myself as I can do. Most of those "Prize winners" were examples of how much money a person could spend having everything done professionally.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:45 pm:

For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of Ford.

Most of us strive to achieve some level of purity, and some go to great lengths to get as close to factory original as they can. Mostly. Even those who most preach the Gospel of originality will make some changes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 05:50 pm:

Kevin, nice car, I don't know the purist's in the club but just keep driving yours and enjoy it, both of mine are not show cars.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 06:02 pm:

Kevin

You are correct. Your car does not look right to a purist and most of us can tell what is out of place. Brass with wire wheels, etc. I could go on and on, but what is most important is that you have great taste on how much of each color you used. You could have made red seats, but instead you used black. You could have used red on your windshield, but you used black. Your car is ESTHETICALLY pleasing to the eye. That is what makes your car look so good.

I like your car. You did great with it and I am sure you enjoy yours as much as I enjoy mine.

Thank you for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 06:16 pm:

If any body thinks the A people are any different from the T people their nuts. They have purists anything goes types no nothings and know it all's too. Same stuff different model car letter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 06:50 pm:

kevin, Im putting a similar car together. I really like your seats.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 07:09 pm:

Thanks Rick and Dave. I originally was not going to use a brass radiator, but when one came available, a 1912 original. I went ahead with the T theme. I originally was going to make a" Holland" car. That way I would not take so much heat for my coat of many colours car. It is a riot to drive and that is what it is all about in my book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 07:15 pm:

David, I am not sure what the seat came off of. The T mechanic I traded him for; said it was off a car older than the Model T. I have looked around and it may be from the N,R or S Ford or some guy thought a Maxwell


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

When i was young and raising a family all i could afford was doodle bugs.After the home/farm was paid for,the kid's through college,the weddings,and on and on it was time to buy our first model T.Little experence i paid double what it was worth! The next model T,i bought what i thought was about the best i could.As mentioned i like the color of yours and i'm glad you could build it but please do not thumb your nose at others!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 07:31 pm:

Enjoy your cars for what they are....don't worry about what others may think or say, just have fun. For "Me"...The friends we make thru our old cars are worth much more than the cars themselves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 07:42 pm:

Kenneth, I have a 24 coupe my dad pieced together in the 60's while he was raising a family. Is it correct? I don't know and don't worry about it. The paint has chips and scratching placed by his stupid kids throwing their bike against it. I figure the car looks like it should being so old. I have plans for next year to go through the car to replace seals, bands, brakes and such. But otherwise leave the car as is. Get the car ready to pass it on to the next generation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 08:01 pm:

I like to keep my cars as close as I can to what they were when I bought them. I rebuild the mechanicals and do a little upholstery work but I love the well worn, worked on, driven down the road look. I walk right by a lot of restored cars all the time because they all look alike to me.

I like the cars that over the years have been used and show their history. I like looking at the split in the right front fender of my sedan. It tells me of the cars history. Some day, to keep it from getting worse, I'll repair it. But I'll only repair far enough to keep it from getting worse than it already is.

But then, my cars aren't anything special. They're not brass cars. They're not special cars with specific important VIN numbers. They never belonged to any important people. They'll never be considered for a museum.

Andy Loso has a 1922 Centerdoor that shows a whole lot of its original features. From the looks of it, it's still got the paint that was put on it in 1922 and no more. The interior is nothing fancy but, it's good enough. To me, that's a show car. You can't get any more pure than that. You can't get any more honest than that. The RVW car is a lot more impressive to me than probably more than 95% of all high point restored cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 08:08 pm:

Tyrone, this purest thing is a "double edged sward" You mentioned that they had very nice cars built to a "purist style". And now you have a car built to a different style. be it "built to period correct" speedster or "built to whatever the hell you like style" or just unrestored original. So it seems you two were at opposite ends of the equation. You have the opinion they were not as interested in your stuff or slightly slighted. You seem to take no offence in it and see some humor in it (a good thing) Now lets step into "my shoes" or someone with similar likes as mine. I do not consider myself a purist but I am trying to build as period correct speedster project as I can in unrestored "patina finish" to give an idea of my personal taste in cars. Now lets say I was at a car show (just looking, not showing) and the folks you mentioned had all three of their nicely restored cars "A's or T's it does not really matter" and you had a nice well used period correct speedster and a un-restored original model T (or A) of any type at the same show. I would walk past their cars and give them a nice look and maybe say "Hi, nice cars" and move on (in a hurry) to get to yours. Then I would probably spend a extra long amount of time talking to you, looking at your cars, crawling under your cars, taking pictures of your cars, ect. All the while the owners of the nice cars I quickly passed over are watching me and the rest of the crowd that has formed around your cars, and wondering "what the crap, just happened" I have seen it happen many times... So I guess the "moral of the story" if there is one. Is that the slighting goes on, at both ends of the scale. :-) I always say the main things are "Be Safe, and Have Fun" !!! submitted with respect, Donnie Brown ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson. Moruya, NSW, OZ on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 08:54 pm:

TTofT,
I think I'd enjoy visiting your garage much more than I would your neighbours.
Cheers,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 09:03 pm:

Who cares about Model A's anyway ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 09:19 pm:

right-on Burger. Who cares. Even if I do have one.
I have a friend who restores cars. Mostly antiques. He has always had a passion for A's, T's and old fire trucks. Todd Williams for those who might or should know him. He has a collection to die for. Yet the car he takes to weekend night shows is a Model A Sedan made out to be a "Grapes of Wrath" car. People flock right past the tens of thousands of dollars hot rods, to look at this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Jensen on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 10:57 pm:

My 23 was restored in the early 60's and now the paint is showing it's age. It is still fun to drive and always gets a lot of attention. I took it to the diner that has a car show about twice a month, last weekend. It won first place in the pre 50's class. Maybe it was just because it had not been there before.
Here is a video that my brother took.

https://youtu.be/Qo00313xyKI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 11:22 pm:

Looks great Dan, typically anytime a T gets parked, it usually turns into a car show..like it or not.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 12:05 am:

Since I've been in the hobby since 1966, when I was in 8th grade, I've had a LOT of experience around folks & their (and my) cars. I still have my first car, which I've mentioned here before; I am the 2nd owner & I knew the original owner's wife (he died when I was a year old). So here's a few stories that relate to this thread;
When I first had it running, no top, blanket over original seats, a guy wanted to buy it from me to drop a big V-8 in it (good thing I didn't have a shotgun handy!)

Years later we were on our way to a regional A meet; one night one of the chief judges was telling me what parts were wrong on my car. Hmm, I thought to myself, those are the same parts that were there when Mr. Green parked it in 1954. Years later I found another identical car, made a within a month of mine at the same assembly plant & it had the same "wrong" parts. Here's Ma Green in front of Dr. Hoyt's house in Mt. Shasta

In later years we found a '31 Deluxe coupe; a survivor. I made it reliable, but left it "as found" complete with dry rot in the back window wood. We'd take it to meets & shows and I recall it being in line with some other restored As when some small kids walked by, stopped in front of "the rambling wreck"--our name for her--and they said, "WOW!! Lookit the OLD car!" She was actually two years younger than both restored examples on either side of her. This picture was on a club outing stop near a broken stop sign, so someone stuck it on our car!

Eventually I had a chance to restore a 30 Deluxe Roadster to show car standards. At the time I was going to restore cars for a living, and this was to be THE example of my work. Other career opportunities arose, and as it was nerve-wracking to have the car around, always afraid of getting a scratch, etc., we sold it. Sorta wish I knew where it is today. I didn't know it right away, but at one show we took second place to a beautiful A convertible Sedan--apparently second mostly because I didn't have the correct tools in my tool kit! I was told the owner of the sedan was quite upset as he'd spent $40K having his car restored, and I did mine by myself! (well, the pin striping was farmed out & the upholstery was a kit, etc.) People ARE funny, huh!

So, while I used to do show-car restorations, and I like to have things authentic, I also admire nicely-done speedsters, and even have a plans to build my own one someday (after all the other projects! :-) ).

My T project now is repairing Barney, my barn-fresh '25 and working to keep the patina while making things solid & reliable.

But, my '16 arrived at our home in pieces, so "Harriet" is getting a full restoration (which is taking more time than I ever planned--have you heard this story before??).

Well, this posting sure brought back memories for me, I hope y'all enjoyed it!


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