Home made timer resurfacer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Home made timer resurfacer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 10:09 am:

Someone posted a home made timer tool for resurfacing the contacts inside the timer. Any help?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 10:20 am:

Ran my 1911 open runabout around yesterday. For a year now KGB has been telling me to check the timer and I thought it ran just fine. Wrong. A steering shaft support came in and I polished it up and installed it and changed the timer. The old timer had ridges on the contacts. Not the same car. It picked up 4 mph and the steering was a lot less Shakey at the wheel. I overhauled the Holly NH and reinstalled it and alps good. Guess I need to listen to the masters more often. Thanks Kieth. The biggest surprise was the slight engine rattle at speed that left with the old timer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 10:33 am:

Depends on the timer. Here's how I did a New Day.




I used a piece of can to make a shield around the grinder, but I didn't find it totally satisfactory. A wooden disk on the shaft would be a better way to keep the wheel centered. I'll do it that way next time.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 10:36 am:

This is a tool my dad made years ago to resurface worn Ford roller timers. It centers the timer and allows it to be chucked in the lathe with the outside of the case indexed as it needs to be. It takes about 5 minutes per timer once I get it all set up.






The last photo shows me adjusting the 4 jaw chuck using a dial indicator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:05 am:

Quite a few years ago I ran a pic of a Ford timer re-surfacer involving a mounted Dremel tool that worker really well but I no longer have the pic. Sorry if that's what you're looking for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer---- Klaaswaal NL on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:22 am:

I use this tool to resurface worn Ford Timers.
Toon
730R
731R
1294R


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:27 am:

Stan Howe posted this a couple of years ago:

Mount some kind of a motor, Dremel tool, etc square with the bottom of a board so the sanding drum sticks up through a hole and will square up with the contacts and insulation. On the top of the board mount a piece of 1/4 inch or thinner plywood with a V cut in it. Make one end solid and the other end adjustable. Put the timer face down and rotate it with the sanding drum cutting the contacts and insulation. Take a little off at a time, move the V a little closer to the drum each time and it will clean up a timer faster and just as good as a cut on a lathe will. I gave mine to a friend as I no longer needed it. Mine was made from and old 1725 rpm free motor with a 1/4 inch adapter on the end of the shaft and a cheap sanding drum on it. Cost about two bucks to make and I used it for 30 years. Now I would do it the same way. I've tried to do them on a lathe and it is a real pain. This way takes the outer edge of the timer as the reference and can be adjusted a few thousandths at a time.

HTH, Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Sunday, December 13, 2015 - 11:47 am:

I believe there is a picture of one in a book like The Model T Ford Owner by Murray Fahnestock.


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