30x 3 1/2 all around..advantages

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 30x 3 1/2 all around..advantages
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 11:33 am:

Thinking of putting 30 x 3 1/2 on the front as well as the rear. Don't have to duplicate spare tubes and tires, etc.
Stupid question, the 3 1/2's fit on the same rim?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 11:39 am:

No


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 11:40 am:

No.

30 x 3 rims are an inch bigger than 30 x 3.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 11:43 am:

glad I asked!
Any other advantages to having 3 1/2's on the front as well?

Thanks guys


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 12:20 pm:

Over time a lot of T's wound up having 30x3 1/2 all the way around.
To me it just makes common sense. Nobody will know the difference but you and the one's you tell!
Kind of like adding a starter to a brass era T.
You see that on the forum fairly often.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

The main reason most folks back in the day put 30 x 3.5's all around was in case of a flat - only one size tube for all four tires instead of carrying two different sizes all the time. Seems kind of odd that Henry, being the king of cutting costs and simplifying things, continued to use two different tire sizes throughout the life of the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 12:42 pm:

Most of the after market wire wheels are 30 x 3 1/2. The front wheels on my 13 when it was pulled out of the barn in the late 40's had been changed to 30 x 3 1/2 years ago. The front and back wheels looked about the same age.

I am now running 30 x 3 1/2 wire wheels with a spare and love them. The wood wheels are stored along with other period correct parts and will go with the car when I am gone. No more loose wood problems and the wire wheels run true. Easy to change a wheel in case I have a flat.

Enjoy not needing two maintain two different size tubes and tires. My model T seems to handle fine and I also like using the later steering shaft/gears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 12:42 pm:

John: On my '19 and my'1917 Depot hack I went 30 x 3 1/3 on both vehicles. All Interchangeable. Only way to go. If you go 30 x 3 and you have multiple cars it becomes a problem having enough spare and rims and tubes and flaps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 12:57 pm:

Bill,

It wasn't that way throughout the life of the Model T. Just until about 1921, when demountable rims were used. BTW, Canadian Ts are 30 x 3-1/2 all around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 01:27 pm:

I have three T's with 30 X 3 front and 30 X 3 1/2 rear. One car has nominal size tires all around. It drives the best, steering is easier.

The car with 30 X 3 1/2" tires all around has noticeably heavier steering. The weight of the demountable rims no doubt adds to that extra effort needed.

The car with 21" tires and wire wheels has the heaviest steering.

No reason to own any flaps, they are not needed Bill. One tube of each size is carried in the cars that don't have spare tires. Flat tires are a rarity, since there are no horses on the road, and therefore no nails.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 04:41 pm:

Nails can still get to those tubes. Maybe not from horses, but following other Model T's on tour!

This 30 x 3 suffered from an upholstery tack lost on the road....




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 06:05 pm:

The most expensive part that Ford purchased once he really got into production was tires. He made friends with Firestone and then got the best deal he could get. The 3" tire were a few bucks cheaper. Multiply that by a million and it adds up, especially with tax at only 3% Federal taxes....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 06:10 pm:

It would seem if only to me the car body was more expensive than tire's?? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 - 10:02 pm:

I have always wondered why a number of early cars used two different size tires and have yet to get an answer that seems to be definitive however given Fords cost cutting mentality Tony's argument makes a lot of sense. I always thought that initially the smaller front tire was designed to cut through the mud and sand encountered on early roads so that the rear drive wheel could be more effective. I have no documented basis for this but it makes sense to me. The second thought is also a cost cutting issue as I think Ford tried to keep the steering mechanism as light and cheap as possible which is why we have to deal with the delicate steering mechanism located under the steering wheel. In order to do that there was a need to keep the resistance from the front wheels to a minimum. It was not as important in the early years but once these cars were being driven on pavement it became more of an issue and when they switched to balloon tires the problem was big enough to require a change in the steering ratio from 4 to1 to 5 to 1. Even with the change in the steering ratio and whether you have 3" or 3-1/2" tires up front it is a good idea not to turn the front wheels unless the car is moving.


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