Best wire for bolts?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Best wire for bolts?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 12:36 pm:

Digging into the transmission today, I found this.




Obviously I'll want to use a heavier gauge wire when I reassemble. What's best? I assume it won't be available here in Podunk and I'll need to order it online.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 12:39 pm:

Sky Geek offers stainless aircraft safety wire at reasonable prices. I use .042".

http://www.skygeek.com/malin-stainless-safety-wire-042-1-lb-ms20995c42ss1lb.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Fuller on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 12:41 pm:

http://m.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/appages/safetywire.php?clickkey=4386

.032 should work good. If you want to go heavier use .041.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 12:50 pm:

Steve HF also sells .040 stainless steel wire in 1 lb package which on a "T" will last a long time.
Now for the Army Technical Inspector:
Safety wire improper

The wire on the left side is actually pulling to LOOSEN the bolt and the one on the right is neutral. If this were on a CH-47 it would have to be done over. Safety wire should always be installed to have a positive tightening pull on any bolt. I'll crawl back in my hole now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer---- Klaaswaal NL on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

Steve ; I always use wire that concrete workers use for reinforced concrete.That wire you can twisted several times before it breaks.
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 02:24 pm:

We use this.



Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Skille on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 02:57 pm:

Herm, That looks like copper wire. I recently went through a 1925 engine that had never been worked on before and every thing was safety wired with copper wire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 03:21 pm:

No, I don't think that's copper. It looks more like this. If it was in straight pieces it would be called baling wire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Fuller on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 03:48 pm:

Check out this link for a tutorial on how to safety wire.

http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/tech-how-to-safety-wire.215935/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 03:50 pm:

Baling wire makes good welding wire, as well as lock wire. Conversely, welding wire makes good locking wire.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, December 20, 2015 - 06:23 pm:

G.R., I caught that too. (Former CH 47 Crewchief in a past life) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Dupree on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 08:13 am:

Be careful when you are buying new "mechanics" or "rebar tie" wire. I have some Chinese wire that is extremely soft and is very easy to break. I am sticking with stainless safety wire for safety wire applications.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 02:21 pm:

The tie wire that I have been around seems softer than baling wire to me. I think it is a bit larger too, but I haven't done an accurate test for either one. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 11:10 am:

Ford originally used brass wire in the engine and transmission. Best to use non-magnetic wire in there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 06:12 pm:

What Ron Dupree said about the foreign made steel being soft is very very true. I make conduit for antique gas pumps and can only use USA made steel conduit because ANY foreign made conduit just kinks. I have tried to point this out to the UL listed folks but they just don't care. I guess they will when a building falls down or the conduit in places like SAMs club starts sagging.

Travis Towle


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael J. Wilcox on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

I used brass wire I picked up at the hardware store. The stainless kept breaking when twisted. My transmission had brass wire when I tore it apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 08:04 pm:

Personally my "safety wire" comes in a red squeeze bottle with the words "Loctite" written on it. Always fits. Hasn't failed me in almost 40 years of T work!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Monday, December 28, 2015 - 02:54 am:

I thought I would post this for future reference. It's a close up of a ww2 bomber engine. My thought, if it's good enough for a flying machine it's good enough for my T.




Travis Towle
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, December 28, 2015 - 05:50 am:

Travis, that is exactly how we were taught when I went through Chinook(CH 47) school in '69. I doubt that it has changed. <g> Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Monday, December 28, 2015 - 01:55 pm:

I suggest that there is no such thing as a "one-size-fits-all-best-wire". Or a best wiring scheme for that matter.

If you are wiring something that is moving rapidly, such as a rod cap or a propellor hub, you need fairly large diameter wire and need to run the wire so you don't twist it excessively. Fatigue is your enemy in such an application.

On small bolts or nuts, .025 diameter wire is fine. The common size is .032 for most safety wiring jobs. If the application is subject to salt or water or snow, then stainless is your best bet because it won't corrode. If you're near magnets, then either brass or non-magnetic stainless is a better choice. If you're stuck along the road and just need to get home, then whatever you've got in your tool box is the right thing to use.

For some applications such as fire extinguisher triggers or emergency escape handles, safety wire should be very small diameter brass or copper so that it can be quickly broken by hand.

For some aircraft applications, there may be a manual that actually specifies the wire size to be used. Control system turnbuckles, as an example, require what seems like oversize wire. But that's because durability and reliability are the prime concern.

You can find more than you ever wanted to know about safety wiring a this site:

http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/Chapter_07.pdf

Scroll down to Section 7 for safetying details.

Dick


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