How to clean carbon deposits out of a cylinder

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: How to clean carbon deposits out of a cylinder
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 05:53 pm:

So it took me a lot of tinkering to get my accessory carburetor adjusted properly. In the mean time number one cylinder (and plug) got particularly gummed up with gas and fluffy carbon.

I don't want to take off the head this time of the year to do a proper cleaning. Everything is running fine, now that it's adjusted correctly and I installed a cast iron manifold stove to the carb inlet. I don't want those deposits to harden and stay there now that first cylinder is firing properly. Any ideas ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 06:20 pm:

Run the heck out of it at "high speed". Don't just piddle around back streets. That will be your best chance of cleaning much of the carbon out without pulling the head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 06:32 pm:

LOL ... hmm... that's kinda what I was doing once I got everything working properly. Drove on all the hills and around Rochester for about three hours this afternoon. I have never had the car up to 52 mph before in all the years I've owned it. I guess I'll be out tomorrow to continue the "treatment" :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 07:23 pm:

You could race engine and spray water into the inlet a little at a time with a windex sprayer. Water really does a number on carbon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 09:28 pm:

I had seen vintage articles that mention water injected into cylinders ... but have never heard of anyone actually doing this now. So, spray some into the carb inlet?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 09:34 pm:

Just make sure to not over do it and kill engine. you should see black sooty exhaust almost immediately.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 10:02 pm:

If you have ever removed a head on an engine that had a head gasket leaking water into a cylinder you will find a very clean piston. It gets steamed cleaned! The carbon is gone. Uncle Jack is right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 10:15 pm:

We used to clean out our Octane engines with it. Had some chromed cylinders and use Bon-Ami to help reseat new rings. Just put it on a folded paper and flipped it into the intake. Worked!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 08:02 am:

Right ... Bon-Ami is non abrasive feldspar. We used to use that to clean the ferrotyping drums in our darkroom. Very interesting.

Going to try the water today once I get the engine good and hot. I guess I'll use a sprayer from a Windex bottle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 08:29 am:

That's also how I cleaned the turbo on my boat's diesel engine, with a very small amount of dish soap added. Worked great. So if anyone decides to add a turbo to their T, now ya know how to clean it!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 10:45 am:

Honestly, I wouldn't worry one bit about it. As long as it runs well, just drive it. People worry way too much about soot/carbon on plugs and combustion chambers. These are not efficient engines. They generate soot & carbon. I would be more scared about introducing water into my cylinders and steaming the oil off the cylinder walls. Even if momentary, I would be concerned about scoring the cylinders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 11:35 am:

Be careful about spraying water into the engine. if you do, use a very fine spray. My son ruined a corvair engine by pouring water into the carburetors. However the corvair has aluminum heads with steel insert valve seats. The water cooled the valve seats and they came out of the heads.

A model T is cast iron but it could crack if it is hot and you put cold water on it.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 11:55 am:

Just sprayed a fine mist and it seemed to make a difference. I had just done some cylinder honing, put in new ringside reground the valves several months ago and didn't want to crap up the valves with a crust of carbon sooner than usual. So ... It worked fine and the engine seems happy once warmed up.

Thanks guys

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Rochester


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