Original factory paint colors

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Original factory paint colors
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 10:14 pm:

does anyone know how to get the original factory paint colors ?? and translated over to today's paint manufacture ?? I see so many different colors of "T"s and about 15 shades of a color, just can't picture "frugal Henry" offering so many colors as I see today. I'm working on 3 "T"s and want to keep them as close as I can to original. Any help from you guys will be greatly appreciated, thanks MTFCA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 10:37 pm:

For your 1914 and your 1919 these paint chips should help.



For other years, the encyclopedia has the scoop.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

It was a tough decision but I think I'll go with BLACK, you gotta be kid'n me, are you serious ??? I would love to paint my 14' a reddish/orange, my 19' Roadster PU solid jet black and my 26' touring a light green w/cream wheels. Looks like I'm SOL for being original. Seriously, thanks guys !!! what's this encyclopedia thing ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 11:38 pm:

Its part of this website. Go to the MTFCA home page and you will find the link to the Encyclopedia on the right side.

Or, you can click here!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 21, 2015 - 11:57 pm:

Bruce McCalley's Model T Encyclopedia is partially on this website. The full thing comes on disk, and is the best fifty bucks you can spend on your Model T. It includes Ford catalogues, all the parts books, owners' manuals, info on Models A through S (1903-1908), Ford Methods & Shops, all the serial numbers, yearly changes, etc., etc. More info here: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 01:12 am:

John, one thing to remember, a LOT of T's and TT's were used as commercial vehicles and were painted how ever the owners wanted. Just a thought. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 10:03 am:

It needs to be said that the colors called out in Bruce's book are not anywhere close to original Model T factory colors for 1909 - 1913. The blue color is a particularly obnoxious baby blue. The green color is sort of like British racing green. Both of those colors were nearly black originally.

As such Bruce's book is of little use to the Model T restorer who wants his car to appear close to the original color. Black is black, so that one is right at least.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 11:38 pm:

Was hoping to find paint chips of original colors by today's paint manufacturers. Is there such a thing out there ?? As large as the MTFCA is, you'd think there would be more paint information available. Hey thanks guys, I'm not going to give up. I'm sure there are other "T" guys wanting to know the same thing !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 12:36 am:

Google is your friend. Try this: http://www.paintref.com/cgi-bin/colorcodedisplay.cgi?year=1926

and this: http://www.paintref.com/cgi-bin/colorcodedisplay.cgi?year=1927

As Royce pointed out, the 1909-1913 green and blue were so dark as to be almost black, even in sunlight. 1914-1925 is the easy one. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 09:45 am:

Several folks on here have used a very dark blue paint originally used on Mercedes cars to get the Midnight Blue color. Perhaps a search through Google would help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 09:53 am:

Original blue color from the February 1912 color brochure:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 10:14 am:

This can turn out to be a colorful subject for a lot of people who are purists. I believe I would use the colors that have been selected by both Model T Clubs to be the closest to the original colors Ford used.
Would they be exact? I don't think so. The people from the clubs selected them and at the same time say they may not be perfect.

Macs sells the paint in their catalog but to each his own on as to whats to be considered 'correct'.

And by the way this information comes from their latest catalog.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 10:25 am:

John:

Try Rob Chamberlin thepaintguyz.com e-mail to xtremeautofinshes at yahoo dot com. 417 eight six zero 89 five zero in Reeds Spring MO 65737.

They will mix half-pint quantities if you want to try something. He was at Hershey in Oct and he mixed Channel Green for me from Ford's paint references.

I have no affiliation with him, but he is a very helpful person. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:21 am:

Royce's Valentine card is certainly telling. Looks mighty close to black to me.

I'm no paint expert, but suspect that the reason we don't see any paints today that have the same "almost black" look is that it's not a color so much as it is a painting effect. If you just keep adding black pigment to a blue paint, the result becomes more muddy brown than dark blue.

But if you do a multi-layer job, you may be able to achieve the effect in which the blue only shows in direct sunlight. Probably need to paint the surfaces with a good, strong blue, then topcoat with a lightly pigmented coat of black. If the tint base for the black is clear, then the blue will show through under direct sunlight.

I'm not saying this is a slam-dunk process. Would take some experimentation to get it right.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:52 am:

This is the blue town car from the 1912 color catalog.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Both the Valentine card and the color catalog make for interesting speculation. Both card and catalog page would have been ink prints. But the actual car is a pigmented paint. So both chemistry and application process are different.

If the original paint color were anything like the currently recommended Midnite Blue then the printers would have made Royce's samples more distinctly blue.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 06:12 pm:

Don't know if these will show up properly but here are some color samples from 1928.
The same fashion for colors were in vogue at that time.

You should be able to read the names of the colors.

There are several others which are similar, only the names are different the blues are so dark that they only show a blue look when compared to black.
color chips


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

Here is a green and some more blues.
The two blues are Durango Blue (top) and Suburban Blue.

As you can see very dark blues were popular and very dark. As were some of the greens

I think in both cases the blue and green on early Model T's were these very bark colors.
chips


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Allen on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 06:28 pm:

John,
I don't know why people keep asking where can I get an antique color matched in modern paint.
I have put this on here several times before:

http://www.autocolorlibrary.com/

They can match ANY auto (or carriage!) color you want in modern paint.
My advice: DON'T buy it from them. Buy a color "chip" with the color painted on it.
Once you have that, take it to a local auto paint store, and have them scan it into a computer. Then they can mix it for you.
Regards,
Jon
(805) 641-2804


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:34 pm:

WOW, what a amazing response, I'm going to copy these responses for future reference. I'd say, the info was out there but didn't know how to get it. Thanks to MTFCA Forum, you guys in my book are "the greatest".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Allen on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 03:42 pm:

John,
Here is a picture of a '26 touring that I had done in "Commercial Green" obtained on a chip from autocolorlibrary.com:


I don't think you can do much better especially with modern paint.
Regards,
Jon


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