Just My Rant - "Is it 'T' or 'TT'???"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Just My Rant - "Is it 'T' or 'TT'???"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 09:41 pm:

Help me out, guys. From presenting an earlier thread, the discussion had me 'agonizing' over calling just ANY Model T truck a "TT". My Dad had always identified the 'TT' nomenclature to be for a Model T 'Ton-Truck'. Our title does reflect Dad's T as a '1926 Ford One-Ton Truck'.

From what I'd been told growing up, a Model T roadster pick-up was just that - A "Ford Roadster Pick-Up"... The 'TT' identification was for a heavier/stronger chassis with longer length, perhaps having a 'factory' steel body/bed/rack, perhaps an after-market body made of wood, or something else made of wood such as a 'Depot Hack'. A true TT vehicle would be atop a one-ton chassis, having extra spring leaves than cars (say, NOT like that 'roadster pick-up'???), likely a worm-drive Ruckstell (which is much heavier/stronger than cars), and actually capable of doing the heavy work. (FYI - There sure seem to be many differences/similarities between our 'Cranky' - the '25 coupe, and the '26 TT! a/k/a Dad's truck or now 'Toybox Twoo'.)

As the now-owner of an actual TT, I feel it a necessary, honor-bound duty to protect "My Dad's Legacy". Someone needs to learn there's a difference between "T" and "TT". Please educate if that person happens to be ME! (Years ago, I had worked at Kimberly-Clark... "Kleenex" IS a registered trademark, and was THEIR invention process. Unfortunately for them, it seems their trademark has been hijacked by 'facial tissue'.)

My apologies for the rant - Please correct me if my understanding is wrong.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 09:55 pm:

Yes, you're right. TT means Ton Truck, and it's different. It doesn't just have extra spring leaves. It has bigger, heavier rear springs, a longer and heavier frame, a bigger, heavier rear axle with worm drive, heavier rear wheels, and other parts different from a Model T. Look in the 8-5-28 parts book everybody has, and you'll find a separate TT section in the back. The roadster pickup, on the other hand, is built on the Model T car chassis,and so are most depot hacks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 10:22 pm:

A fellow I knew locally that passed away about 20 years ago,Jake Klutz, had a T pickup with wood cab and bed. And he had a 1 ton similar in design but he never called it a T or TT, he called it a "Jumbo". I finally got to see it 1 time,he kept it hid in a barn,and it had a auxiliary transmission. I was not into T's as I am now but looking back it is was obvious he didn't realize the Jumbo transmission did not indicate the model of truck. I wish i knew what happened to his 2 T's. 1 of my TT fenders came from his stuff as I went back years later from when I had first saw the trucks seeing about buying some parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 10:23 pm:

-Steve-
Had done some research with the State a number of years ago when Dad gave me the title. Found at that time there were three 1926 one-ton Ford chassis' titled & registered in Wisconsin. I've personally seen those other two. The Waupaca resident has a wood body, steel-rim flatbed (wood stakes), and the Janesville resident was a depot hack. Our truck has the Express steel body, steel-rim flatbed, and the factory steel stakes and wooden side-boards, (like Burger's photos).

Why do we often hear "TT" when it is really just a 'T-truck? (Note the small/second 'T.)
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:18 pm:

Marv,

People either don't know the difference or don't care. To make it even a little more complicated there were also aftermarket kits available back in the day that made a regular T into the equivalent of a one ton truck, Smith Form-a-Truck for example. These kits typically beefed up and extended the chassis and used a much heavier rear suspension and axle set-up with power coming off the T hubs via chain drive.

Our TT has been in our family since 1946. It's the first thing I ever drove and has been part of my life since I was born. I didn't know the difference between a T and a TT until I acquired it about 15 years ago and began frequenting this forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:33 pm:

Marv, the flatbed, stake side is different than the "Express" bed. The bed on the TT with the coupe body that you pictured in another thread is an Express bed. It looks like a bigger version of the factory pickup bed. I think that's why some people refer to an express bed equipped TT as a "pickup". Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 23, 2015 - 11:51 pm:

David.. I understand what you're saying. The 'pick in my posterior' is when knowledgeable people don't differentiate. A 'T' is a Model T. A 'TT', while with some same similarities and characteristics, is a different vehicle altogether!
Yet, observe the 'purist' installing Kevlar bands ('When' was Kevlar even invented?), a water pump, distributor, and a 12-volt alternator into their T vehicle.... BTW, paint it baby blue too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 12:23 am:

I've had a thing for trucks since I was a kid ... OLD trucks, that is. I cannot remember who
'splained to me what a TT was, but it was basically "TT means Ton Truck and has very little in
common with a regular T". This was said in a negative way. No one wanted trucks back then
and people thought I was a few bricks shy of a load for liking them ! :-)

I would guess that those who refer to TT's as T's or vice-versa are just ignorant of the differences.
I deal with a lot of antique stuff and every kind of item has a specialty following and a legion of
ignorants and idiots who think they know all the facts. I am sure there are a few of these rascals
in the T/TT mix up too.

If you think this Ford thing brings 'em out, try driving a DeSoto ! I got my first DeSoto not too
terribly long after they quit selling them. Yet, just the very mention of that name drew that deer-
in-the-headlights look out of many, and 30+ years later few have even heard of a car by that name,
let alone able to tell you the difference between a Fireflite, Firedome, or Firesweep.

Frankly, it's all a laugh to me. I like the blowhards letting me know how it was, and I enjoy the
sincere people with a neat personal story to tell. I even like the idiots who want to tell me how
wrong I am doing things. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 08:17 am:

It's delightful it's delovely it's Desoto


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 09:11 am:

I don't think TT meant anything to Ford other than it was the model of the One Ton Truck during the Model T era. Just like the later AA didn't stand for Ass Anchor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 09:13 am:

I remember DeSoto's as a kid. Grandparents, and my parents had one. They were huge and built like tanks. Rode like a cloud. My folks drove ours, I think it was a '54?, center post windshield, until it got to where you would have to add more oil to it than fuel to keep it going. You could follow your trail of smoke back home. Mom even named it "Smokie".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bbrunia on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Page 564 of the McCalley book has a factory letter announcing the new truck. It is referred to as the "One Ton Truck" and "Ton Truck." "...at the disposal of ton truck users." I just read "Me and the Model T," and pioneer Ford dealer Roscoe Shellar called it the Ton Truck (TT)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

My dad had a 1938 DeSoto pickup! It had been built as a 4 door sedan and later the back was sawed off and made into a pickup. So you see although the T sawed off pickup was older, the trend continued into the early 50's. Many old cars were converted into trucks.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bbrunia on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

So it is my belief Ford did intend for the TT to reference the Ton Truck, and when the "AA" was introduced, the letters no longer correlated.


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