Hendrick Motors Baltimore MD

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Hendrick Motors Baltimore MD
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 10:19 am:

It is 1928 and the "New Ford" has been introduced. All these photos were taken the same day. I see a Model A tudor and a AA chassis in the overhead garage shot.

Interesting location for the hot water heaters in the work shop. I think they would be better near the floor.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 10:22 am:

Not water heaters but radiators, radiant heat from steam, probably kept the place toasty without using floor space.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 11:13 am:

Heating systems that utilize radiators can be hot water or steam.

The system in the above photos is most likely hot water.

The reason that the radiators are up on the wall is that it is most likely a gravity flow system and the boiler is located on the garage floor.

With a gravity flow system, the radiators must located higher that the boiler. If the garage had a basement and the boiler could be installed there, then the radiators could be mounted on the garage floor (first floor).

I attend many estate sales in and around Minneapolis so I have many opportunities to see the inside of older homes. Radiators are typically mounted high up on the walls or on the ceilings in basements and garages in homes built prior to WWII as well as into the 1950s. Again, the reason is that the radiators must be higher than the boiler in the basement in a gravity flow system.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 01:55 pm:

I lived in older houses in St Paul and Minneapolis off and on over the years. Our hot water radiators just like the ones in the photo were always mounted on the floor under the coldest window in each room. In summer time we would place a painted board on top each of the radiators to place flower pots or other decorative items.

My house in Hebron KY also had that style of radiators, again mounted under the coldest window or windows in each room. In all cases the heater was located in the basement. The ones in MSP were originally coal burning, converted to oil at some time in the past. The coal chute was through a basement window. The delivery man could open the chute and dump in coal any time day or night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marc Roberts, York, Pennsylvania on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 02:43 pm:

The little nickel plated valves visible on the end of the first and third radiators make me think steam. The other two probably have those on the end we can't see. Very nice photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

The little valves are to bleed air out of the system. If you don't bleed them you get thumping noises from the whole system.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 03:34 pm:

Now that I look harder at the third photo, it could be a single pipe steam system (one pipe at each radiator serves as both the inlet and outlet for the steam as it travels to and from the boiler).

I believe hot water gravity systems are two pipe and require an inlet pipe and and an outlet pipe at each radiator - the hot water from the boiler enters the radiator at one point and exits at another point as it returns to the radiator. Steam systems can be single pipe or double pipe.

In the third photo, I can see a pipe going into one side of the radiator but no corresponding pipe on the other side of the radiator. So, maybe it is steam.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 05:45 pm:

Baltimore has a fairly extensive steam system used to heat buildings in the winter. It is still used today.

Very nice pictures, Royce. Thanks for posting. Any indication where this dealership was located in Baltimore?


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