26 Leans to the drivers side

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 26 Leans to the drivers side
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Ensinger on Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 08:57 pm:

when facing Ole Betsy head on, she has a noticeable lean towards the drivers side. How do I correct this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 09:40 pm:

Mine did that but then I realized that the springs were not centered In the rear.

Travis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 09:43 pm:

Chuck

Could be many things, from sagging frame members, bent frame, or simple like un-even tire pressure or wrong spindle as the '26-'27 front spindles are lower than earlier ones.

Investigate with measurements of the chassis to ground, the fenders to top of tires, looking for causes. Set the T up on a known flat straight concrete surface and look over each corner , compare the high side to the low side. Compare measurements.

Frame side rails should be even to the ground on each side. If not, could be frame issue.

Spring shackles or springs control the upper frame and body alignment, sagging could be located there.

If the springs are the problem, they can get worn / broken or loose set, allowing the sag. One fix is to 'pad' the spring inside the cross member to lift the body back up. Detailed in Service Bulletin.



Your sedan sure looks good from your profile, doesn't seem sagging :-) Good luck in this challenge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 12:07 am:

Dan T's advice is excellent. Sometimes the problem is nothing more than than a previous owner being a little overweight, causing the springs to shift a bit. But you cannot know unless you check things over.
SOMETIMES the fix is nothing more than loosening the spring clamps front and rear, then giving the car a good shove or two beyond straight. Let it settle back a bit, then tighten the spring clamps again. On the rear, all years, and early cars on the front, tighten the passenger side before tightening the driver's side. This will help to compensate for the years of side shift.
Be a bit careful tightening the spring clamps. They need to be tight! But, NOT TOO TIGHT. It is possible to break either the cross-members or springs by over-tightening the clamps. Sorry, I don't know any magic number for the torque.
Also, recheck the spring position measurements. You want to be fairly sure the spring centering bolts could have properly set in their holes.
Right hand drive cars or cars leaning the other direction? Same idea, but you may have to switch sides and directions around a bit.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 07:05 am:

Just put a fat person on the passenger side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 07:53 am:

Also check that you have the correct spindle on the right side. The pre-26 spindles make the car sit higher.

The spindle on the right is a 26-27 spindle. Note the difference in axle position.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 11:12 am:

Broken front crossmember?

Broken front crossmembers seem to be much more common in '26/'27's than in the earlier cars. The crossmember sometimes fractures around the front spring tie bolt and the front motor mount does such a good job of holding all the broken parts together that most people don't know they have an issue until the front spring or motor mount is removed and everything is given a very close examination...

As a matter of fact, I have driven a couple customer cars and commented about the "goose-ey" steering (which the owners usually think is how a T was supposed to handle). The culprit most times is a loose front spring clamp (motor mount), but in cases where the mount appears tight, it is usually a fractured front cross member.

Of course, leaning can also be: incorrect spindles, incorrectly clamped front and/or rear springs, sagged or fatigued springs, etc...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell R. on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

What Wayne Sheldon said, but remember that the sequence and progress of re-tightening these "U" bolts can have a bearing on how the chassis will pull against the spring, so keep an eye on how the car is sitting as you proceed by eyeing it up but also you could take a couple of measurement from each frame rail to the flat ground.
The other trick is to be sure that the "U" bolts are not tightening up against the cross member, this can happen if a leaf is missing, which may have been removed by a previous owner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 12:49 pm:

The head of the thru bolt in the center of each spring should go into a hole in the frame crossmember. If it is not in that hole, the spring is not centered. The front clamp on a 26 only has two right in the center. These should be tight and have cotter pins in them. The rear spring has two U bolts over the spring and they should be tightened evenly. If one side is tightened more than the other, it will cause the car to lean. When you tighten them alternate from one side to the other until they are tight. Measure the height of the frame on each side near the axle. Do this front and back. Then measure again near the rear engine supports on each side. The heights will vary between front and back, but should be same side to side. If the frame heights are even side to side at the front and also at the back, but uneven near the engine mounts, your frame is bent.

Another thing which could make the car appear to lean would be if it has bumpers. Sometimes the bumper brackets will sag on one side and the car will appear to lean but the actual car is not leaning, just the saggy bumpers
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 04:04 am:

The cross member in the 23 frame I am working on had the tie bolt hole elongated about two inches. Took some work to weld it up and get it centered and square again. Always keep the u bolts tight. KGB


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