Model T just fine so had to work on modern iron - non T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Model T just fine so had to work on modern iron - non T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Monday, June 30, 2008 - 07:21 pm:

There was nothing wrong with our Model T today and so I had time to fix things around the house. Our modern tow vehicle which is a 2500 diesel pickup truck had an out of service power window actuator that had gone bad last fall. The dealer wanted a lot of money to fix it but I needed a set of tires for the T so I let it slide and opened up the door to talk to people rather then lowering the window.

The window had fallen to the bottom of the track and I had to lift it back up by hand with much effort. A glass company said they could replace glass but not fix the power window if the mechanism was broken.

Things are tight inside of the door and I couldn't see how it worked. I called the dealer and they said that I should just bring it in at $85 an hour and they would take a look at it so I simply just didn't use the window. Every once in a while I would forget or someone else driving the truck would lower the window and the glass would drop.

I was going to fix it when we came back from Mexico in February but I got this nasty neck pain and just vegetated for four months with stinosis of the spine and a lot of pain. Well the other day I felt well enough to work on it and took the door panel off and looked inside with a bent mirror and found that a ball and socket joint had broken. The power window works on a scissors system and the window is lifted by two little trailer hitch ball type joints running in a horizontal track. The two little balls are covered with phenolic caps that retain the ball and keeps it in the track. That little plastic cap is in two halves and is held together by a circlip. The circlip was broken and one of the plastic pieces was shredded.

I called the dealer and asked the price of the 1/2 inch plastic cap and they informed me that it was not a shelf item. In fact, I would have to purchase the power window mechanism complete with padded window tracks, the frame and the gearing and the power motor with the switch. The cost would be $260.00 plus tax and installation They did not recommend that I fix it myself.

Now with my Model T mentality this made me very angry and so I got my engineering cap out of storage and started to design a fix. It took several minutes of thinking and planning to make the part and install it but it works like a charm and I still have the $387.62 they quoted in my pocket.

You can see in the picture below that the top picture is the good joint with the plastic cap in position. The second picture shows the split steel pad I made to trap the ball joint and keep it in position. The steel pad slides in the rail just fine and the window works as it should. You can see where I had to grind away part of the rail on the right end in order to slip the pad into position. The sketch at the bottom shows the way it was made on the left and my fix on the right. The tricky part was making the socket trap the ball and I did this by splitting the pad, capturing the ball and then slipping the pad into the channeled rail.

One would assume that they could sell that little 62 cent part over the counter rather than sell you the entire mechanism at the high prices they charge. If I was working and had to leave it at the dealer and had rented a car It would have cost me over $500 for the complete package. As it was I purchased a set of little grinding wheels at Harbor Freight for $16.00 and fixed it myself. Now Mary and I can go out to dinner several times and even purchase a few tanks of fuel.






There was nothing wrong with our Model T today and so I had time to fix things around the house. Our modern tow vehicle which is a 2500 diesel pickup truck had an out of service power window actuator that had gone bad last fall. The dealer wanted a lot of money to fix it but I needed a set of tires for the T so I let it slide and opened up the door to talk to people rather then lowering the window.

The window had fallen to the bottom of the track and I had to lift it back up by hand with much effort. A glass company said they could replace glass but not fix the power window if the mechanism was broken.

Things are tight inside of the door and I couldn't see how it worked. I called the dealer and they said that I should just bring it in at $85 an hour and they would take a look at it so I simply just didn't use the window. Every once in a while I would forget or someone else driving the truck would lower the window and the glass would drop.

I was going to fix it when we came back from Mexico in February but I got this nasty neck pain and just vegetated for four months with stinosis of the spine and a lot of pain. Well the other day I felt well enough to work on it and took the door panel off and looked inside with a bent mirror and found that a ball and socket joint had broken. The power window works on a scissors system and the window is lifted by two little trailer hitch ball type joints running in a horizontal track. The two little balls are covered with phenolic caps that retain the ball and keeps it in the track. That little plastic cap is in two halves and is held together by a circlip. The circlip was broken and one of the plastic pieces was shredded.

I called the dealer and asked the price of the 1/2 inch plastic cap and they informed me that it was not a shelf item. In fact, I would have to purchase the power window mechanism complete with padded window tracks, the frame and the gearing and the power motor with the switch. The cost would be $260.00 plus tax and installation They did not recommend that I fix it myself.

Now with my Model T mentality this made me very angry and so I got my engineering cap out of storage and started to design a fix. It took several hours of thinking and planning to make the part and install it but it works like a charm and I still have the $387.62 they quoted in my pocket.

You can see in the picture below that the top picture is the good joint with the plastic cap in position. The second picture shows the split steel pad I made to trap the ball joint and keep it in position. The steel pad slides in the rail just fine and the window works as it should. You can see where I had to grind away part of the rail on the right end in order to slip the pad into position. The sketch at the bottom shows the way it was made on the left and my fix on the right. The tricky part was making the socket trap the ball and I did this by splitting the pad, capturing the ball and then slipping the pad into the channeled rail.

One would assume that they could sell that little 62 cent part over the counter rather than sell you the entire mechanism at the high prices they charge. If I was working and had to leave it at the dealer and had rented a car It would have cost me over $500 for the complete package. As it was I purchased a set of little grinding wheels at Harbor Freight for $16.00 and fixed it myself. Now Mary and I can go out to dinner several times and even purchase a few tanks of fuel.














window


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Saturday, July 05, 2008 - 04:59 pm:

Next time that happens go over to your Ford dealer.They sell the part for the older 70's 80's cars and it should work fine.Unless something changed a short time back.I bought several back a few years ago and keep them on hand.1 thing,keep it greased.They dont put much grease in there hopeing it kicks out right after the warrenty expires so you will not like the high repair estimate and trade it in.Those warrentys make the dealers a killing.It gives a false sense of security and people are getting scared to drive a car without 1.


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