Valve Stem Covers.........

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Valve Stem Covers.........
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICK/TORONTO on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 04:33 pm:

I just purchased these valve stem covers on Ebay, when they arrived I tried to put them on and they just slipped right over the valve stem half way down the stem......I did not receive what I believe are the adapters the four nut looking items.....what is the idea with the adapters do they screw into the valve covers and then the whole unit goes on the threaded part of the stem, this is the description of the covers from Ebay........



Description
Model T Ford Valve stem covers with adapters Made by “Schrader” (8pcs). Covers measure approx 1.900 tall x .583dia. Cover base .610 x 26tpi. Adapters from .400 x 27tpi to .610 x 26tpi. Original condition, brass with nickel plate.


92b6_1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 04:50 pm:

The adapters screw onto the valve stems tight against the felloe, and then the covers screw onto the adapters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 05:12 pm:

You need the nut "adapters" to use the valve covers. They are for a metal valve stem inner tube. The nut is what actually screws onto the valve stem, the valve cover screw onto the nut. This arrangement allows removal or installation of the valve stem cover with just a few turns instead of having to screw the valve cover all the way up or down the 1"-2" of metal valve stem each time you need to service the tire. But as you discovered, they will not fit a valve stem without the nut. There are 2 common nut designs, one has a leather washer in the hollow bottom of the nut, the other has a protruding countersink shape. I suspect the leather bottom one is for a wood spoke wheel, the countersink style for a wire wheel, but either style should work with either wheel. I am using the leather filled hollow nut style and the identical valve covers on my 21" wood spoke wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICK on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 05:24 pm:

Hi William thanx, I went out and started messing around with the valve covers as it turns out the adapters were attached to the valve covers so I've seperated them and tried puttting on the adapters they went about two thirds of the way on and have become very tight......I assume I need to tighten them the rest of the way with a wrench, I trust this will not damage the valve stem?.......needless to say I am very very new to Ts.....again thanx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICK on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 05:32 pm:

Hi Jeff I assume I have the leather type nuts as I cannot pick them up with a magnet.....I am installing them on wooden spoke wheels.....as I said earliear the adapters will go down about three quarters of the way and cannot be finger tightened any further do you use a wrench to finish them down to the felloe?.........thanx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Tosch on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:12 pm:

Rick,

What kind of valve stem are you trying to screw the nuts onto? They are designed for the old style threaded metal valve stems and do not go on modern rubber valve stems. If you have rubber valve stems, this is your trouble and I would not force them on with a wrench. They should easily screw down all the way on the metal threaded valve stem, no wrench should be needed except maybe just for final tightening.

Charlie Tosch


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICK on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:23 pm:

Thanx Charlie I guess thats the problem I've got the new style valve stem its rubbber.....so I guess I just learned another T lesson....and they only go about a third of the way onto the valve stem before they stop and cannot be fingered tightened any further, so what does one do is there another adapter for this situation or are the old style tubes still available?......thanx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By humblej on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:24 pm:

I will turn them all the way down by hand and then put another 1/4 - 1/2 turn on with a wrench. You did not confirm that you have a metal stem inner tube, but assuming you do, do not use a wrench to run the adapter nut down that far, the threads on the valve stem may be goobered up, not hard to do by changing a tire, the adapter nut is brass so will not take a lot of abuse. You should be able to clean up the valve stem threads with a tap(or is it die) or a steel nut. Threads on the adapter nut must be good since you were able to screw them down some distance by hand. If you have a rubber stem inner tube it is a different story as they were not made to accept a screw on valve stem cover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:28 pm:

Adding to what Charlie said, those covers fit the original Model T metal valve stems which are smaller diameter than any of the metal stems for sale these days. I think you can occasionally find used sets of the old stems for sale at swap meets, but they are getting harder to find. If you do find them you will then have to find someone willing to vulcanize them to a tube. Again difficult.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Ward on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:38 pm:

When you purchase tubes out of a catalog, they are generally listed as rubber or metal stems (more expensive).

A bit more on the nuts: The ones I got from Mac's sound like the countersink type - the bottom of the nut fits down into the felloe and centers the stem, which is much smaller than the hole.

That brings up a new problem - I have four 30x3.5 demountable clincher rims, two Hayes and two Ford (I think). The two Hayes rims had a smaller hole - still bigger than the metal stem, but not big enough to accept the countersunk part of the nut. Maybe these should have had the other type nut, but I've never seen one. So I ground out the rim hole to match, and they all work fine.

Stan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By humblej on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:38 pm:

OK, see someone beat me to the rubber valve stem thing. Rick, they do sell new inner tubes with metal valve stems, short for wire wheels, longer for wood wheels. You can also buy just the stems to convert over, new style has a rubber base and goes on like a tire patch with patch cement, you cut off the old rubber stems and vulcanize on the new metal stems. The old method for attaching a metal stem is different, the stem has a flange with concentric rings for grip and you put it inside the hole in the tube. A bridge spring goes on the outside and the whole thing is held together by a nut on the bridge spring, so the tube is sandwiched between the valve stem flange and the bridge spring. These are easy to find at swap meets, cheap, and are completly reusable, be sure to change out the actual valve called a Schrader valve if you go the old route, yea, they are the same guys that made the valve covers and that is the technical name for the valve. I recommend the use of a bridge spring and nut with any style metal valve inner tube.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Ward on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:47 pm:

Oops - I said it wrong. The hole to be resized was the one in the steel felloe, not the rim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Tosch on Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:49 pm:

Rick,

There are several options. Coker Tire www.coker.com has tubes with metal valve stems, metal valve stems only with a rubber on the tube end that can be vulcanized to your tubes at a tire shop. To use these, you first cut off the rubber stem on your present tube and then vulcanize the new stem right over the hole in the tube where the stem was cut off. Be aware that there is also some other mounting hardware required if you change to metal stems, so don't just order the stems. Talk to Coker if your not sure just what you will need. They also have covers for rubber valve stems which are one piece stems with the nut on the bottom but inside at the top they are threaded to screw on a rubber stem in place of the small plastic valve stem cover. It's hard to tell that they are not the real thing when they are installed. The one question I'd ask about them before ordering is what length rubber stems will they work with (distance the valve stem protrudes above the fellow) to make sure they will work with our rubber stems. Check out Coker's on-line catalog. I'm pretty sure other tire suppliers like Universal Tire www.universaltire.com also have similar items.

It looks like the Coker metal stems that you vulcanize to your tubes cost about $7 each plus the cost of vulcanizing and having to remove and replace the tire on the rim. The covers for rubber stems are about $13 each so that would probably be the cheapest way for you. (These prices are from a 2003 catalog so may not be right now).

I'd suggest that you order a printed catalog from Coker as that will give you a lot of tire and tube information

Charlie Tosch


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