Pest Control

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Pest Control
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FloydV on Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - 11:24 pm:

I'm ready to store the '23 for the winter. The storage building is not secure. I'm concerned about mice and other critters. I remember seeing an ad in Hemmings some time ago for an electronic pest deterrent. I believe it was made in Minnesota. Anybody have any experience or reccomendations on this type of pest control?
Thanks
Floyd


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - 11:50 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 12:07 am:

If there is a potential for critters in your storage area, I would avoid covering the car with anything. Critters love to hide under and set up home in covered areas. Operating a storage facility for 14 years has taught me this and the fact that no storage unit is rodent free.

Dave DeYoung


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thunder on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 01:01 am:

I read somewhere..... Scented soap, such as "Irish Spring", strategicly(sp?) placed in the car, will keep the mice away. Having numerous barn cats here, I've never had to resort to that though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 06:37 am:

Up here in Minnesota a popular deterrent is either the Irish Spring or the ubiquitous pine tree air fresheners. Guys with boats load up with about a dozen of these and stick them in strategic places.

As Dave De Young stated, leave the car uncovered. Also shove some aluminum foil into the tail pipe or back of the muffler to keep critters from accessing the motor. Mice can jump very well.

Don't waste your money on the gizmo from Browns Valley.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 07:40 am:

I've used two different manufacturer's electronic pest control devices...plugged into regular household current. Neither worked..mice still made a home inside. I don't remember the names of the firms...devices thrown away.
Other than Adrian's solution, I've found the old fashioned, wooden Victor mousetrap baited with peanut butter (chunky) to be most effective. Check traps regularly...every 3-4 days in fall at least.
Good Luck. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 01:05 pm:

To follow up on what Dave said above about not putting covers on the cars, do not leave your roadster or touring top folded down, since that just leaves attractive places for the mice.

Fordially, Keith Gumbinger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim ( www.ModelTengine.com ) on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 02:00 pm:

Dryer sheets work


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 02:07 pm:

There is a car cover somewhere that turns your car into a snow globe looking thing; it is a clear climate control system that goes all around your car. You drive the car over the bottom of the cover that is black rubber like material, and then zip the plastic around the car - it is a thick back window like material.

A filtered fan that keeps pressure on the inside of the “clear globe” controls this system. When zipped down it blows up around the car not touching the car either on top or sides, and provides protection from dust, dirt, overspray, and if the wife drops the weed eater or slams a door into it.

This might be a good cover - and it is what I plan to use to keep dust off the car and keep it in filtered air so it stays clean. If a rodent got in there you would know right off the bat.

The bad thing - I do not remember where I saw this cover at, but think it was DuPont Registry several years ago.


Travis
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas J. Miller "Tom" on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 02:49 pm:

When my brother and I built my storage garage, we took extrordinary effort to make sure there were no holes or gaps anywhere in the structure. The weak link proved to be the garage doors. For winter storage, I now have aluminum gutters that I close the garage doors into. From the outside, all you see is a three inch tall vertical plate. This shields the bottom rubber weatherstrip from gnawing mice. The sides of the garage door also have rubber strips, but the metal door to the 2x4 presents less than a 1/4" gap so that mice cannot squeeze through.

Inside the garage, I have resetable mouse traps baited with peanut butter and also warfarin poison blocks. These are the steel box traps that use a lever and a clock spring to catch the mice in a holding cell.

To date, the trap has only sprung twice. Once I found a dead mouse that was probably trapped immediately after construction. The second time, I found a very upset chipmunk that came in the open garage door.

We have tried the ultrasonic traps in our other garage and found the mice tend to ignore them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FloydV on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 03:04 pm:

Thanks for all the suggestions. I had forgot about the tailpipe plug. Will try the soap thing. Basicly the T will be in a barn with no electricity. Was hoping to find a battery operated deterrent........Can set some traps also. Kitty is one of the things I was hoping to deter... Incentive to get going on the garage addition!
Thanks again
Floyd


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Eichstadt on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 04:06 pm:

Floyd,

Best thing that I found and have used for several years is 'Bounce" fabric softener sheets.
Put a couple under each seat cushion and a couple on the floor,and in the engine compt.The added plus is that your car will smell great in the spring!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Cicciarelli on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 04:48 pm:

....a long time problem....
Http://people.hws.edu/cicciarelli/trapic1.html

You could always put the T up on Jacks...and have the feet of each individual jack sitting in a bowl of water. Of course you'd have to refill the water from time to time.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Barry W. Fowler on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 04:52 pm:

Rick: If I tried that method, the water would be solid in no time. I have had no rodent problem though. Maybe the fact that the buildings storing the cars have no food source at all in side and our two cats may play a roll.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Denis Chicoine, MD on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 07:23 pm:

Barry, I've not tried it, but antifreeze instead of water used as Rick suggested would solve the freezing problem as well as potentially poison any critter in the garage that was inclined to get a drink.
Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack voss on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 07:28 pm:

I'm a new MTFCA member , " T " owner and a horse drawn carriage
collector. We use moth balls for mice and moth's in carriages.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 07:33 pm:

Along with cats and snakes, I use d-con. That puts the little devils out of business right now. The mice around here must be extra smart. I tried traps with peanut butter, and too often found the peanut butter gone and the trap untripped. Maybe bugs were eating the bait.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 08:12 pm:

Or maybe the mice are so thin they need to gain weight so you can trap them :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Cicciarelli on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 08:20 pm:

Nah...they are able to lick the peanut butter off of the triggers. However, if you use peanut butter and stick one or two corn flakes in the peanut butter, they seem to get caught. Not sure if they are trying to pull the corn flake out, or simply taking a bite out of it, but it works quite well with the common wooden Victor snap trap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Iversen on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 09:18 pm:

Keith G. made a good point that could be taken a little further. A collapsed top is a nesting invitation to mice. While Floyd may not have a rodent problem, many of us are plagued by them (I trap 2-4 deer mice a day as the spring explosion occurs in the N. CA outback). Where they nest they chew and I've learned to never park my touring with the top down. With a screw driver tip (or similar) tightly jam a half peanut into the bait recepticle of a standard Victor or, with the yellow paddle trips, tightly pack a segment into the bait pan. They rarely can dislodge it without a trip. Rick's correct: Peanut butter is easily licked away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 09:28 pm:

We tried cheese, peanut butter etc and the mice wouldn't touch the trap. Then one night I was awakened by our daughter's screams. She had taken some crackers to her room and she heard a crunching. It was a mouse eating the cracker (saltine). Now I set the traps with crackers and am usually successful.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:18 pm:

Here is that link about that car cover I was talking about above - I wanted to post the link so I would never loose it! I would bet this would work great to protect your car from the cracker-jackers.

http://www.carcapsule.com


Travis
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:26 pm:

This site below says:

The Original CarCapsule "one of Motor Trends 10 most innovative products" Do you have a special car or bike that you want to be able to see, but have it in a place that has dust, insect, humidity or similar problems?

Want your buddies, mom, and kids to see it, but not touch it?

Need to keep those rakes, bikes, broom handles, vermin off your car or bike!


http://garage-toys.com/carcapulcarc.html


Anyway -

Travis
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Hoffman, Hays KS on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:33 pm:

In my job I come across mice. I am a telephone repair man in a rural part of the state. In less than 5 minutes I can be out of town and in the county. If you've taken the time to notice that the phone company has buried wires and access points out on the road. These older pedestals are metal and have a front lid that is bolted closed. If not sealed up and closed mice will will get in as they want out of the wind and can make a nest, and yes they will chew on the wires and crap everything up.
My main point is that access will be theirs with only a crack in the lid of less then the thickness of my finger. There is no food left in there by any telephone employee.
I like the idea of top up, and I would leave the seats up also, drop lots of smelly stuff around, traps along the outside walls of the "shed" and use some decon too. This is of course if you can't take the T out for coffee on Saturday mornings a couple times over the winter to keep the mice guessing if their winter home is on the move. I'm waiting for Tim Moore to chime in here, but one of the biggest things is having food and water around. Next is having a small place where "nesting" can happen. At the shop I see the evidence that they run thru, and once in a while see one dead from the decon, but try to keep the clutter from the corners. I once found a nest in my 1959 Lincoln when I was just renting a storage stall, they found the piece of foam rubber I had between the battery and the inner fender. Next thing I knew I had a half dozen babies under the hood. That was in late fall when the temp drops and turns cold. Never seen much mouse problems when warm but they are most likely around somewhere. Starting to ramble, so time to go to bed as I am still employed and have a job to go to in the morning. Later, Jerry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:33 pm:

If you put the peanut butter on the underside of the trigger and bend it down slightly, the rodents tend to use their nose to get to the last of the bait, but only briefly.

Dave DeYoung


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Iversen on Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:50 pm:

You've nailed it Norman. They're fools for salt--Anyway it can be delived, in any presentation that precludes an easy heist.(I use the original, salty, gag you, Planter's pacs) Regretfully, I can not key in here to help you fix your T but, in the world of one species of rodents, I am THE "Micenator". Step aside Arnold. But, as JR would quip: "Ha Ha", because my record for disrupting the work of moles that turn our lawns and garden into the kind of upheaval I've only once before experienced, in kind: B 52 runs, in S.E. Asia, fall miserably short of what these little evolutionary marvels subtract from my property "improvements". MOLES rule. Submit to natural selection. We are lesser creatures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 02:10 am:

Yes Jerry I have been reading this.

The first thing to do is eliminate the breeding population with traps or baits. I don't believe in things used to "repel" rodents like fabric softner, soap or moth balls--it might work a little but the mice are still around.

If they are stealing bait off traps you can tie cotton balls or bacon on the pan. Place traps along walls where they like to run.

Use mouse poison with caution--dogs like it due to the blood meal attractent. It is best place in a tamper proof bait station so children and pets can't be exposed. I like block baits as they can't be relocated like pellet baits (de-con). Some mouse bait requires multiple feedings for a lethal dose and the animal might get sick and quit feeding--look for "single dose" that only requires one exposure.

Last winter I had a call where mice ate the wires out of a car ($1,300), another where mice chewed the water supply line to an ice maker--it sprayed water into a basement ceiling for several weeks until the drywall fell onto the floor and another where mice got into a king sized bed and nested in the pillows--they burrowed through the comforter and mattress.

Everyone has their own home brewed method, some are not safe. Kill them off, exclude them and keep traps and bait out for the occasional invader. Keep pet food and bird seed in closed containers, brush and woodpiles away from the buildings.

I would rather see dead mice than live ones that went from the garage to the house but smell nice like soap or fabric softner!

Tim Moore
MSU Pest Mgt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 07:41 am:

It is not only mice but red squirrels and chipmonks that will nest in cars and under hoods. I had my truck parked outside my office next to a tree and in only one day a red squirrel chewed the insulation off of the firewall and built a nest filled with pine needles and pine cones with the insulation and filled up my air cleaner. You think I didn't jump when I opened the hood to see why my truck would not start...just have an angry squirrel jump out at you when you open your air cleaner up to see what's wrong. I'm glad Rocky didn't have Bullwinkle with him!

Also be sure to seal up the hole in the block where the choke wire crosses thru...I've found acorns in my valves.

Denny


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jonaq on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 07:03 pm:

We had mouse problems in the house every winter (cought 25 one winter in the house and there were still more), I mentioned it to the exterminator we use on the job, and he gave me these green blocks he uses in his bait traps. I have not seen or cought a mouse since!! I threw sone in the basement, attic and barn. He said they are safe for dogs and cats. I will never be with out them!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 07:48 pm:

In regards to the electronic mouse control devices. They work PROVIDED the mice are not already in the building. They will not chase the mice out but will discourage them from coming in. I leave mine plugged in year round. I also put poison bait by the cracks under the doors to further discourage them In 35 years I have suffered no significant problems. Of course here in the frozen north we only have a month or so before the mice dont venture out from under the snow in the fall. By late November there are no further problems.
Ethylene Glycol antifreeze makes a fine poison bait but is highly lethal to dogs and cats. I have used it on pigeons with great success.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 09:52 pm:

jonag: Those "green blocks" are "bromadiolone" and very toxic to dogs and cats--your exterminator doesn't know what he is talking about. That compound causes leakage in the small blood vessils and dehydration. A second effect is disruption of "cellular resporation (the ATP cycle)" where cells exchange fluid and energy. The treatment for this exposure is injections of Vit K1 and possibly a blood transfusion to save the pet. That compound WILL kill dogs and cats.

Less: Ethylene Glycol can't be processed in the kidney and forms crystals. This causes kidney failure and a painful death. The treatment for anti-freeze exposure is direct injections of something like vodka directly into the abdomenal cavity. A table spoon can kill a dog. Your experience with the electronic devices is contrary to the studies in the profession but if you like it that is fine with me!

I keep sealed and tamper proof bait stations in the corners of my garage and storage building. Outside I have bait stations that look like a rock and are about the size of a bowling ball--they open with a key and have bait inside that can't be shaken out (google "Protecta landscape bait station"). Again, I eliminate breeding populations and don't fool around with repelling them, I heat with wood and have woodpiles that they are constantly trying to nest in--don't want them in the house where they can chew the wires and cause a fire.

Travis; the first air bag systems were made near me in Bath MI and called "Omni bag". I don't know if they are still in business.

Pesticides and rodenticides are registered with the EPA for a reason, millions of dollars and years of research are required for an acceptable compound--I use the work of others that are smarter than me and not an off the cuff method. But then again--if I violate the law and do something goofy I can loose my liscense and pay a $5,000 fine for each occurance.

Be safe around your family and pets and don't take chances--always follow label instructions and avoid accidental exposure.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Concerned Toyota Owner on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 09:03 pm:

http://blog.toyota.com/2008/03/living-up-to-ou/comments/page/5/#comments


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ross on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 10:06 pm:

I had drier sheet in my moterhome & the mice just made a nest with them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 02:12 am:

Ross, at least you should have good smelling mice!
Mom sold her second car this fall and I was able to talk her into letting me park Lizzy in her semi-heated garage and not the storage building I had been using when I started this thread. We haven't talked rent price yet but I know it will involve some rides in Lizzy to dinner.
Her garage is pest free (decon) and you can bet I'll be keeping a close eye on it!
Floyd


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ward Sherwood on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 02:33 am:

from the model A message board:

http://www.fordbarn.com/aforum/messages2/450890.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 08:08 am:

Hey, thanks for posting the link to the Car Capsule! Now I know what to use to store the Fordor when I get it done. I've been wondering what I'm going to do with that new interior the first time I see a mouse turd! The price ain't bad either...a lot less than having an interior redone.

Tim Moore won't steer you wrong. By the way Tim, I'm at work right now and talking to another Tim. I was reading some of the posts to him and he told me about something he uses that, he says, works very well. I just wanted to run it by you and see what you think. Take aluminum foil and tear it into little squares. Put a dab of peanut butter in the middle, along with a couple D-Con nuggets. then you rolll'em up loose and pitch'em where the mice play (underneath places where the dog can't get to them). He says they carry them away...don't know if it kills'em but he don't get any more mice in the house.

I tried Irish Spring in the 64 Super Wildcat and they ate it...3 bars! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 09:11 am:

I saw a 30 pound possum eating the dog's food on the back porch the other night. Pest control for them is the coyotes that run around the burb every night.

People are screaming to city council that the coyotes are eating their pets. It's on the front page of the local rag. . Govt won't do anything, because they don't attack humans, and are indigenous, as are the possums, coons and skunks. A pair of them were in our front yard a couple months back.

A friend used to hunt them until he realized how smart and good they are.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 06:49 pm:

Guaranteed to work


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 10:31 pm:

Ray,

That doesn't sound like a bad idea. The only downside is that De-con is a "first generation" rodenticide that requires multiple feedings for a leathal dose. Sometimes mice will begin to get sick on De-con and stop feeding. I would guess that just eating the aluminum foil might kill them as it would get stuck or cut them up inside.

I have been after a coyote for 3 weeks now on campus and all I see are tracks--seems all the cops have seen it but I am never there at the right time. I need to find it before it finds the sheep barns. Maybe tonight...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 10:58 pm:

My grandfather had a fail safe non toxic recipe for mice and rats. Mix 50% corn meal with 50% plaster of paris. Set it out in trays. It results in terminal constipation.

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 11:23 pm:

Tim,what would keep them @#@# Squrriels out of my shed attic?I have boarded it up and they stayed out for a long time,I noticed the other day some young ones that were born in a nearby tree were climbing in and out of a tiny hole under the ridgecap.Looking at me like I was the invader.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 11:24 pm:

Kitty cat felines are cute but for whatever reason,the strays that come around here,would rather waddle all over my 74 Lincoln instead of going to chase squrriels out of the attic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 11:38 pm:

Tim an old hen on a short string tied to a stake will draw that coyote out. The hen will let you know when he's near.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Moore on Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 11:48 pm:

Mack,

Those are tough to deal with. The best approach is to exclude them like you have been doing. If you have small holes that are difficult to plug you can use steel wool packed in tight so they can't pull it out. It will rust so something better is copper wool but that is hard to find for the public. You could live trap them and take them away, I don't know where you are but up here in MI that would be bad as they would be taken away from their food stores and starve. Myself, I wouldn't try to kill them, just keep them out or move them.

Here is an interesting fact about rodents (rats, mice, rabbits, squirels etc.); a bite from a rodent is not a good thing because they eat some of their own feces for Vit B6 synthisis. A bite is a puncture that can infect a person with bad things and cause bad infections.

Big winter storm in the next 48 hours here--I got home at 6am, got the family off to school and work then worked on the tractor until 1pm to pull the mower and put the plow on (Farmalll cub). I will go through the shop and garage this weekend and check all the "mouse boxes" to make sure they are full of bait. I really worry in the winter that something is going to get under the car covers and eat holes in the interiors.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 10:30 pm:

Thanks Tim.I fiqured out what happened.I had made it so they couldnt get in easy,so they built in the near by trees.Which was fine because they need a place to live to and werent hurting anything.
Well lately,a pair of HUGE Red Tail Hawks have been buzzing around.So I reckon they must have used common sense and decided,"Hey,this dang 1x4 aint that bad to naw thru,and it sure beats gitten eat by that dang hawk."
I will see what I can do to fix the holes though soon.As I dont want them to feel the attic is thier new home.
I tried a couple years ago that spray that smells like coyote and fox urine,that is supposed to really skeer them off,YEA RIGHT.
I sprayed it directly on a squirrel and he turned around so I could get the other side!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By aaron on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 10:43 pm:

3 cups of oatmeal mixed with 1 cup of plaster of paris. I'll do the trick for rats & mice.
Don't put it where the dogs and cats can get at it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 02:32 am:

Grady,
Here's one where neither one got away...this snake was really persistent. These photos were taken by an Alabama Power employee.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 09:21 am:

Mr. Sanders, that was a big one, and yes, he was persistent. Most folks don't realize that a snake can crawl through some mighty tight places, they can squeeze under a door with very little space. A snake doesn't really have a reverse gear, I would wonder if this sucker could have backed out of the fix he put himself in, but I have seen them get out of some might tight places.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Denis Chicoine, MD on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 09:44 am:

Grady, I've got some of the smaller versions of the one in your picture in/around my storage shed. They are only 2 1/2 feet long but still scare the s#%t out of me when I open the door and it's 2 feet away. They don't work well at minus 6 degrees, though.
On a funnier note, several years ago while a friend and I hunted elk in Wyoming, we made a mouse trap out of a bucket of water and a few sticks with PB. After 5 or 6 mice from the camper met their end, one of the survivors got even and ate the nose pieces off my partner's glasses. We were 50 miles from the nearest store on a weekend and his nose wasn't very comfortable for the rest of the hunt.
Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 10:43 am:

Doctor Chicoine, those 2 1/2' long will hurt you, and are harder to spot, a rattlesnake, almost any snake, is very difficult to see, even if you know where he is. When I was still working up in the Dakotas, we had sheds built over our gas and oil production facilities, the rattlers soon learned to move in there and stay warm and eat the rats, it was impossible to keep either out, and we tried, there was a real danger of being bitten and you were a long way from help. When I was a boy we used to make up a hog slop in a 55 gallon barrel, mixed water and what we called "rice polish", a bigger version of your bucket. It would form a skim on top, and at night the possums and rats would walk out on it and fall through and drown, the hogs liked that extra protein.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Denis Chicoine, MD on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 10:59 am:

2 years ago I went to the shed, where I store my T parts. The wind was blowing hard and shaking the entire shed. The shed was dark inside as I went to open the overhead door from the inside. I didn't hear the rattle as I reached down to open the door. A few minutes later, after Teresa entered the building with me, we started looking for the strange rattle noise. He was coiled 2 feet away from where I had reached down. I killed him with an 8 foot 2X4! This summer, one was just outside the door jam as I openned the door. That put him 2 feet from me as I raised the door. I killed him with a nearby '26 radius rod! I sometimes carry my .44 Bulldog with snake loads up there. I occasionally have found large bull snakes there. They kill mice and rattlers, so I leave them alone. I like snakes less than I like mice!
I was going to go to Rapid City today to pull apart a kitchen for the cabinets for our Black Hills cabin. The minus 6 temps with 25-35mph side winds and scattered ice roads changed my mind about pulling the T trailer so I guess I'll stay home today.
Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 01:16 pm:

Grady,
Should have added this photo too. That rattler you killed is a monster. Back during the summer a friend killed a small copper head by cutting it in half. He picked up the tail and put it in the trash, when he picked up the business end of Mr. No-Shoulders the snake bit him...took three rounds of anti venom.
Make sure they are good and dead before picking one up. It's still warm enough here for them to venture out.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Monday, December 22, 2008 - 05:41 pm:

This is the best mouse trap I have ever used. Wrap duct tape (sticky side out) around a juice can with both ends in place (open with "church key"type opener) Use a coat hanger for an axle. Press sunflower seeds onto the tape and put 3 or 4 inches of water or anti-freeze in the bucket.Provide a ramp and when the mice jump on the can it turns and drops them in the water where they drown.Mouse trap


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, December 22, 2008 - 06:10 pm:

...which releases the marbles, that roll down the ramp, that hit the pin, that pops the balloon.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mick on Monday, December 22, 2008 - 07:42 pm:

Dick

I just laughed so hard..I think I scared all the mice out of my garage.
Now thats funny..I dont care who you are...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, December 22, 2008 - 10:05 pm:

Good one Dick! Rube Goldberg-style of thinking!

Bob, isn't that a bull snake (or pine snake) in the meter base? Looks like one from here. Don't look like no rattler I ever saw.

Personally, I like snakes a LOT more than I like mice and rats. I never had a snake chew up an interior or through a wire to start a fire. Never had one leave piss smell in a car or stored parts. Like Tim said, a rodent's bite can be very bad. My chances of being bitten by a poisionous snake are a lot less than getting bit by a sh*t-eating rat. If memory serves me correct, I've killed two snakes in my life; both were copperheads and both threatened me and wouldn't back off. If they had gone their merry way after our initial encounter, they would have lived to see another sunrise. I've posted before concerning my admiration for snakes, and if I go over a month without seeing a skin in my shop or garage I start worrying. I like having them around as I very rarely ever seee a wild mouse or rat. I want to think it has something to do with the fact that no one in my house kills snakes, but who knows. We do have plenty of them around the house though, both wild and captive. Three of my four children have more than one snake in their rooms (not counting the 4' albino corn snake that escaped somewhere in the house). One being a 6' Dumeril's Boa, which is an endangered species and were almost wiped out from their native Madagascar due to deforestation and people indiscriminitely killing them. They are being captive bred in the US now for re-release, but it will likely do no good unless they start putting knots on some heads.
Anyway, getting off my soapbox, a good healthy and hungry population of rat, bull, black, garter, corn, racers, or other rodent-eating snakes will keep the mice, rats, chipmunks, squirrels, and even crickets, in check. Nice thing about snakes is when the rodent population drops, so will the snakes as they go where the food source is. If you're seeing a rise in the snake population around your house, I'll promise you there has been a rise in the rodent infestation. Kill the snakes and the rodents have nothing standing between them and your upholstery.

For several seasons I had a 3-4' rat snake living in my garage. He could be found most of the time with a flashlight under the refrigerator, but I made sure never to bother him or make him feel threatened. I didn't want him to leave, for I figured his reason for staying there was a good indication it was a rodent thoroughfare and he was like the troll under the bridge...they had to get by him to get to their destination. Anyway, I was only disappointed in his presence on one occasion. There was a nest of wrens that had hatched outside the garage door in a bird house and they were all learning to fly one day. I was working out there and saw what was going on so I put the cat up and sat down to watch the show. They would flutter around here and there, and were really doing pretty good getting their wings exercised, when one lost his bearings and went past me, into the garage, and crash-landed right in front of the refrigerator. I jumped out of my lawn chair and made a dash for the little fella as he had no idea the impending doom that could befall him in that particular location, but it was too late. He had no more than shaken off the crash and gotten on his feet when the snake had him.

Okay, I guess I've bored you fellas enough with my tales. I'm no tree-hugger, not a card-carrying SPCA or PETA member, but I do know when an animal's presence is very beneficial to me (and poses no threat whatsoever) I tend to let him be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, December 22, 2008 - 10:07 pm:

Bob, I didn't mean to sound like you had implied that was a rattler. I was thinking about Noel's reply to Grady and got it all mixed up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, December 26, 2008 - 06:13 pm:

Use peppermint oil on some cotton balls and place them around where you think mice or squirrels are. It is safe. You can get the peppermint oil at GNC stores. It is pricey but does work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Friday, December 26, 2008 - 06:29 pm:

Ray, That's an Alabama rattler with extra small rattles.LOL Could be a bull, I'm not sure...he sure wanted that mouse.
Bob


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