Winter is here in the NW

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Winter is here in the NW
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Seager on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 02:26 am:

I tore this engine apart to build up a spare. Check out the rod bolts they appear to be self adjusting. I also have rebushed both my cars front ends. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 07:26 am:

I think that engine is powered by hair! I think I would invest the $50-$100 and give it to a shop to boil it for a couple of weeks to get rid of your chia-pet problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ben on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 09:46 am:

That engine is fine as is. Just add some fresh oil and fire it up. I have seen worse than that start with no problem. Of course they ran only for about a minute.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 09:55 am:

That is one ugly looking engine, but it will make a great before and after pic set. Good luck on the rebuild.

Dave DeYoung


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 11:49 am:

Michael.

Fly down here, I will load you up with some good starts and relive my storage problem!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 03:43 am:

I have got my engine all cleaned up and ready to go to the babbit doctor tomorrow, Sure glad i got a heated hanger day time high was 23 today.Clear but cold. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 09:39 am:

Hard to believe that's the same engine! Good job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 11:30 am:

Looks Great Mike! I would suggest you make sure the water jackets are nice and clean as well...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 11:42 am:

A little chilly here to Mike, engine looks great. Enjoyed your visit last week watching the dials move and talking T stuff. Some times it gets a little lonely in the corner of Oregon, but I would not trade it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 09:42 pm:

Is that the same engine? How did you get it so clean?
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 10:39 pm:

I aggree with Norman,I would like to know how you got it so clean.That is very clean compared to before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 02:13 am:

I soaked it for a week in the electrolysis tank and then pressure washed it followed with washing it with solvent and then giving it a good bath with wd-40. It is amazing what the electrolysis will do. I flew it to Bend Oregon today and helped pour all the babbit. Was a cold clear day here. This is picture of MT Jefferson on the way to Bend Oregon today. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 05:36 am:

Great job!
Did the electrolysis process affect the babbit?
(Other engines in need of rust removal may have babbit good enough for a few more years?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 11:43 am:

The electrolysis did not damage the babbit. I had been reluctant to try it but i couldnt find a place to have the block boiled out. It really attacks the rust but is quite gentle on the metal. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 06:57 pm:

Mike. After adding rust remover to the water jacket, one of my freeze plugs came loose. The rust remover really did an excellent job on the water jacket and let me know about a future problem with a cracked block. They may look great on the outside, but on the inside who knows?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brian c lawrence on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 09:58 pm:

Mike,


Im rebushing my car's spindles this weekend. How did you drive the spindle bushings in. Do I need a press? Or can I do it at home? Also, I ordered neoprene seals for the inner bearing, they seem small compared to the original felt units. The seals that I pulled off the car are a piece of felt sandwiched between 2 pieces of metal. Was the felt piece meant to be taken out of the 2 pieces of meatl or not? Maybe the neoprene seal goes inbetween the 2 pieces of metal in place of the felt? Please help.

Thanks


Brian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 11:21 am:

Brian. I pushed my bushings in with a press, however i think you could just drive them in with a block of wood the press fit is not that tight. The seals you have should just replace the old seals. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brian c lawrence on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 03:19 pm:

Mike,

Thanks for the response. I installed my new bushings this morning with just some wood blocks and a hammer. Had to file off some of the bushings, they were too thick. Also had a "lip" on the lower half of the axle housing that I took off witha file. Spindles are now on. I just need to finish the hub/bearings and shackle bushings.

Brian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Saturday, December 20, 2008 - 10:48 pm:

When I did my bushings, I had to turn them down, as the interferance fit was too much--didn't want to split my spindles. I also measured the gap between the axle "ears" and the spindle length too, turned the bushing faces to fit while they were in the lathe.
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 04:00 am:

I finally got very thing together to start assembling my engine. Here are a few pictures of what i have so far. Notice the carb i am going to use. It just came back from my good friend Stan Howes looks better than new. It really is winter here we had 30 inches of snow or better, still have maybe 10 inches. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim williams on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 04:29 am:

nice work. I really like your carb. you should have a pretty good car when all said and done. Where in the NorthWest are you located?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 10:22 am:

You and Ron Patterson must have went to the same school on shop cleaning.
Great job so far and keep us posted.
I must say,when I "fly" a engine block somewhere it is in the back of a old Ford or Chevy wagon.that must be nice to toss it in a airplane and take off!:>)No traffic!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 11:54 am:

Tim, I live in Vernonia Oregon it is about 40 miles Northwest of Portland Oregon. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 12:24 pm:

Mike, I'm proud of that carburetor and how it turned out but I'm ashamed of my shop after seeing yours. Did you guys notice he has clean paper taped to the table???? I still can scarcely believe that is the same engine. I'm going to go back through my junk blocks and evaluate them a little differently after seeing how you got that one cleaned up. One thing you might want to think about Mike, is throw the WD-40 out and buy some Gibbs. It isn't the best penetrating oil, Kroil is far better, but Gibbs is the best thing I have found to keep freshly cleaned--especially bead blasted or shot peened--cast iron from rusting again. It soaks in, leaves a nice finish and stops the iron from rusting again. You can paint right over it after it dries. In fact, paint seems to stick better than it does without the Gibbs. I go through about a case of it every couple years. I don't like WD-40. On the other hand, Mack doesn't like Gibbs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 12:55 pm:

Are you one of the "Ax Men," Mike? I've watched at least part of that series on Histeria Channel.

rdr

Born and grown in Oregon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 02:13 pm:

NO but i know a lot of the Ax Men. Phil Logging is right here in Vernonia. Mike

Stan, Where do you buy the gibbs at? Ill try it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 02:48 pm:

Check on ebay for the best prices. You should be able to get a 12 can case shipped to you for about $108.00


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 07:11 pm:

Funny you should remember that Stan! Hehee


I tell people the Best use I found for Gibbs 1 day was when i was helping a cripple man put up a Cb antenna tower.A cat had left it's "markings" mounded near where we were working.No shovels in sight.But there was this Gibbs stuff in a can that my buddy swore by.I sprayed it on the "cat markings" and no more bad odor near our work area!
Kroil has helped me save alot of parts.
I will agree with Stan as years have passed by since I have delt with gibbs personaly and I have read and saw others use it for to prevent rust and it does work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 08:01 pm:

Your timing gear, is it aluminum ,nylon or what as it looks white? also what did you use in your electrolysis bath. I have a canadian block that could use a soak and is that the same crankshaft that was in the original engine only cleaned up and turned?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome R. Hoffman, Hays KS on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 08:21 pm:

Here is what I found. J

Gibbs info


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 09:10 pm:

Must be about your birthday Stan, do we get to dish you lots of you know what?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 11:31 pm:

Dennis, It is a nylon timing gear. I used Arm and Hammer Washing Soda you can get it at most any grocery store. The crank shaft was not used it probably could have been but i had a better one that i had turned. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 02:39 am:

I get it all year, Paul, birthday or not. It is over by about a week, now. Dec. 29th. Had a good day, started with a phone call from a friend at 7 AM and ended with a call from one of my brothers about 11 PM. Lunch in between with an old friend, dinner with friends, several more calls during the day. Cookies from a niece. Good Day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim williams on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 04:27 pm:

Mike,

I live in Hillsboro, and have a T speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 04:51 pm:

My calls started today at o-dark thirty. You have a good day to Stan us old farts have to stick together!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jonaq on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 07:12 pm:

do you have a photo of the electrolysis bath?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 10:46 pm:

Ill Post some pictures tomorrow. Mike

Tim, Maybe we can meet up some time!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 04:19 pm:

Here are the pictures i promised. It is nothing more than a garbage can and a 200 amp battery charger. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By johna on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 06:48 pm:

That is amazing! It did such a great job, and looks so simple. I see three rods connected with a wire, and one by itself. I assume you hook the leads from charger + to the three rods and - to the single? How deep into the can do the rods go? I am asking this because I have an engine in the barn I was getting ready to scrap, but looking at what you did, it might be saved. It has the transmission still attached, do you think it wise to soak it all assembled? Would the bolts come out easier after the soak? Just what I needed, another project!!! This looks like it could be fun though!
thanks for the help
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 07:28 pm:

Hi Mike,

What is the solution in the tank?

What is/are the other electroid(s) made of?

Is the positive or negative connected to the engine?

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim williams on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 12:08 am:

Hey mike

how is the flooding situation out your way? is your shop area and house ok? I'll keep a good thought for you. I would like to meet up sometime.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 11:05 am:

Neil, The solution is arm and hammer washing soda. The electrodes are just rebar bought at the local hardware store, You connect the minus to the part and the plus to the outside rebar on the tank.

Tim we are fine no flooding yet looks like the system has moved thru and Vernonia is going to escape.

John, The rods go all the way down to the bottom. You want to totally submerge your part. This tank can just barely do a motor that is totally disassembled.You would need to take i apart first unless you ahve a really large tank. MIke
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 10:58 pm:

Thanks Mike,

I have two gift engines that are going to need the treatment. One is stuck, the other moves. The stuck one sat in a salt curing shead for years. The stuck engine is a 5,000,000 series engine with a 26-27 trans. The free engine is 15,000,000 series with proper trans. The stuck engine ran a firewood saw for 20 years.

Neil Stuck Engine


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