The Economy - Part Deux

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: The Economy - Part Deux
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 01:09 pm:

Something we seem to have forgotten.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 02:28 pm:

Uh oh...I see the start of a little weather check in the sidewall. Better throw all 4 in the landfill and get some new ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 02:35 pm:

Looks like a great eBay item, use a high reserve for this RARE tire. It was probably owned by Henry Ford or Elvis or who knows...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 03:27 pm:

Again from my book research - most dealers in NZ also operated a repair and parts supply service, and sold petrol and tyres. One Ford dealer told me how, before the war, the used tyres were thrown onto a pile behind the garage and forgotten. The pile became very large.
Then the Japanese took over Malaya and rubber became scarce and new tyre sales all but stopped. Suddenly that pile of tyres was worth something and almost all the tyres in the pile were re-used to keep the local fleet of cars on the road!
John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 04:55 pm:

Grady 32X6?? Yup if the caseing is sound get it caped but rember not on a steer axel. Caps should carry a specal tax to pay someone to pick up all the rubber off the highways.Not a perty sight when some chickeypoo is talking on her cellphone and tailgating at the same time.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 07:05 pm:

landfill? Nah...burn'em! They take too long to rot away in the ground. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 08:13 pm:

I used to get tires from a pile behind the tire store and glued a boot inside the tire then put in the inner tube. Worked fine at slow speeds, tended to be out of balance though. This was in the 1950's when I was in High School.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Cornelius on Friday, December 19, 2008 - 10:42 pm:

During and before WWII my dad was a rural mail carrier. He had to provide his own vehicles and do his own repair work. He never threw away and old part, including tires, tubes,and batteries. During WWII, during ration, he was swamped by people looking for used batteries (they reused good cells and rebuilt), tires (ones with only one boot were priceless), tubes (they vulcanized old patches any tube with only 2-3 patches was like new), and other parts were salvaged. There were no "throwaway parts" during those days!

As a youngster, I worked in a local junkyard. We dismantled many old obsolete tractors, implements, and cars (model t's, whippets, overlands,etc. and hauled them to railrod cars for scrap steel. Wish I had many of them (including a Willys-Knight with a curtain) that ran great (sleeve valve engine), that I could have bought for $25 but my dad wouldn't let me! I was making $.25 an hour!

Gerald Cornelius
Watertown, South Dakota


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Watson on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 01:19 pm:

At least Americans can still fill-up the Conversion van and go for pizza without raiding the kids college fund.


Cheap gas saves Americans $1B per day
by Chris Shunk on Dec 28th, 2008 at 11:06AM

The severe economic downturn here in the US has lead to all sorts of bad news. Layoffs, business closings, and bailouts dominate the headlines, and good news can be hard to find. One of the only reasons to hold our heads high has been the unprecedented drop in gas prices. The recession has caused a decrease in oil demand, which has lead to fuel costs that dropped from $4.11 per gallon in July to $1.62 today. That's a decrease of almost $2.50 per gallon in only five months.

Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for Oil Price Information Service, says the meteoric fall of fuel prices has been so dramatic that Americans are now paying $1 billion less per day than they were in July. The extra cash in Americans' pockets is likely helping to avoid an even greater financial calamity, though even a billion a day isn't going to make the recession go away. Still, it's nice that we can go to the gas station without consulting with a financial analyst or raiding the children's college fund.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 03:07 pm:

Heating oil, too. My tank was filled yesterday for less than half of what it cost in late October/early November.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 03:33 pm:

Sorta like this Grady?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Monday, December 29, 2008 - 10:50 am:

Mr. Berch, Yes ! I have vivid memories of patching patches, and stuffing Spanish Moss in a casing, boots inside of boots and etc. Good picture, I am guessing college boys ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Monday, December 29, 2008 - 07:34 pm:

It is astounding how different folks are reacting to the economy in totally different manners.I have two friends I've known since grade school and all three of us are 55 years old. Both of these fellows are in a similiar income bracket. One has just had his second child in two years at age 55, bought a new house and informed me the other day he and the wife and two young children are going snow skiing in two weeks. The other friend has liquidated many of his assets for cash, is stock piling MRE's, thousands of rounds of bullets and enlarging his pantry for food storage. Go figure??? Two totally different responses to the same economic situation. Both are in industries where they may loose their jobs at any time....Michael Pawelek


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