FRONT & REAR SPRINGS

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: FRONT & REAR SPRINGS
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Sunday, December 21, 2008 - 12:57 pm:

When assembling the front and rear springs, how tight do I tighten the centre bolt that holds the springs together. Do I tighten it to the fullest extent or how loose do I leave this bolt. Does the tightness depend on whether whether I use slip-plate or teflon tape.
Also do I use Tremclad paint on each spring leaf separately on all faces if using slip-plate or teflon tape or just the face that shows at the end of each leaf
Thanks
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam on Sunday, December 21, 2008 - 01:19 pm:

The center bolt should be tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Sunday, December 21, 2008 - 04:29 pm:

I used some EZ Slide paint. Got it at Tractor Supply Company.



And I coated any surface that touched any other surface.



Worked for me. Don't forget the spring pad between the spring and the frame. Hope this helps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Tuesday, December 23, 2008 - 04:42 pm:

Jack
I assume that making the centre bolt tight means tightening the bolt so there is no space between the springs. Do I understand correctly. Does this allow the springs to slip properly between each other.
Also, do I paint the complete springs with a Tremclad with a Tremclad undercoat to stop any rusting or does this affect the proper movement of the springs between each spring
I am working on a 1913 Touring. The springs will be sandblasted and I have not decided whether to use slip-coat or teflon, based on the various opinions I have read on the forum
Thanks
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Tuesday, December 23, 2008 - 05:22 pm:

Gary,

I followed someones advice about painting the springs. I sandblasted them, primed them, and then gave them a couple of coats of paint inside,outside,and upside down and I'm glad I did. I saw another pair of springs on which they painted them after assembly and they were coated with rust that ran out from between the leafs.

The spring bolt should be tight. Springs should flex not slide.

I mixed graphite and wheel grease and spread it between the springs before assembly. Thats basicly what your buying with most of the commercial coatings anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 11:15 am:

Denny
Thanks for your input. If the springs are meant to flex and not slide, why are members recommending painting all surfaces of the springs and then coating with slip-paint or teflon tape, which would assist in the springs sliding. This is what prompted me to ask if the bolt should be tight with no space showing between the springs. Others are welcome to jump in and give me their thoughts and reduce my confusion
Merry Christmas
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 11:46 am:

I've always used graphite grease, and painted the spring after it was all together, but this time I'm going to try slip plate, and then put the spring together and paint it. It is primed now. On the subject of spring pads, in later years Ford used only top material, with a thick leather pad riveted to the ends. I would suggest using the earlier all leather pads. That top material must have worn out after the first few bumps!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 11:48 am:

It's simple geometry.

The distance between the ends of and individual leaf will increase or decrease depending on which direction the spring flexes. As the arch becomes less pronounced, the distance increases. Conversely, as the arch becomes more pronounced, the distance decreases.

When you have one leaf on top of another leaf, the mating surfaces will create friction as the spring flexes. Lubrication between the leaves will alleviate this friction.

If you still don't understand, then ponder why the springs are fastened to the perches with shackles that allow movement.

Erik Johnson
Minneapolis, MN


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:16 pm:

Thank you to everyone for their advice and explanations.
I have another question.....I have taken the front and rear springs apart and will take them for sandblasting. Is it important to keep all the right ends of the springs at the right end again when reassembling. I am concerned that the sandblaster may mix right and left ends.
Of course I will keep front and rear springs separate at the sandblaster
Thanks for answering such a simple question
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 10:07 pm:

Garry -- When you go to reassemble the springs, it probably will be obvious which way each leaf went. You can tell by the wear pattern in the leaf below. If you want to make a small mark of some sort on the underside of each one, it might save you a bit of time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 10:38 pm:

I don't claim to be an expert on the subject but I think "easy slide" is "slip plate" by another brand name. I currently have "slip plate" on my TT springs and I do know it doesn't last forever. My modern leaf springs on my small dump truck have "plastic" inserts between them and they go through the rigors of heavy duty use, where as the rear springs of my TT, I don't think have broken the paint in the last 10 years. If I ever do any spring work or get overly ambitious,I'm going to install the UHMW product that I believe it was "George" suggested in an earlier post. It sounds clean and may be a one time fix.


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