Valve stem reamers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Valve stem reamers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 01:52 pm:

I am replacing the (badly) worn valves in my little speedster motor, and I wanted thoughts and opinions from ya'll on valve stem reamers.

Are the ones available from the vendors the best there is? Are there better (either better deal or better material) reamers available from other sources?

Thanks in advance.

Charles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 02:09 pm:

You might want to look into Chev valves, they are high quality cheap and only need to have guides reamed to install


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 02:12 pm:

I like using an adjustable reamer. You can see a large selection of reamers at: http://www.mcmaster.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 02:22 pm:

You can get Sioux brand valve grinding sets at garage sales and pawn shops. I purchased this one for $100 about four years ago in good shape. You can knurl each worn guide and then ream it to size. The best part is that the knurling provides better stem lubrication. There is not as much rubbing surface but the lubrication is so good that the valve stem will last longer. Mine had quite a few stones in it and I did a three angle valve seat job for improved breathing and higher volumetric efficiency.

The K-line fastener corporation makes a nice valve guide insert. The valve guide hole is reamed out so that the tobin bronze guide liner can be installed. Then they use a rotary hammer to internally swell the new guide liner into position in a swaging process. The valve stems are ground to a slightly smaller size and polished. The guide is then reamed to a proper (running fit) I put that in to start an argument, and the valve is installed and adjusted. The stem now runs in a tobin bronze liner that will last a lot longer than a cast iron one. Tobin bronze has a high tin content not zinc like cheap brass or bronze and does not corrode.


valve grinders


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Watson on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 02:23 pm:

Chevy valves are not cheaper, at least not the valves I got and it took sometime to locate a set. They have a different style of keeper also.

Charles, if the valves are that worn, isn't the guide worn beyond knurling? Or, are you installing valve sleeves to ream?

Gary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 03:48 pm:

Thanks for the replys.

Paul,
I have 1.56 dia chevy exh valves ready to install. Paid 3.20 ea for them.

Royce,
I did not think about McMaster, good call.

Frank,
I will have to look for one of those, that looks neat.

Gary,
Since I am using Chevy valves, I will be reaming .030 over. .015 valves slide though as it is, so I have to go to .030 to clean it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Watson on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 04:25 pm:

Charles,

I was thinking older Chevy valves and not the modern ones with the same style keepers. My mistake. Good luck to you,

Gary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 07:54 pm:

Charles, in an attempt to answer your question, yes the reamers that the vendors sell work very nicely. I was able to ream the valve guides and install larger stemmed valves in frame and it all worked well. I also borrowed a seat grinder and did those at the same time. Grinding the seats worked well but the #4 cyl exhaust valve was hard to get to, but can be done. That may depend on year of car though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 08:12 pm:

Thanks Kenny! That is what I needed to know. The powerplant is coming out, so the firewall will not be in the way for me.

Charles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 11:50 pm:

If you are using 1.56 Chevy valves, there's a good chance you will have interference with the combustion chamber. I used earlier 327 valves that are exactly 1.500 and they are REAL close. Also, if you use a reamer without a substantial pilot, you run the risk of getting an "out of perpendicular" guide which will necessitate taking a lot of meat out of the valve seat.
Some of the earlier Chevy valve spring retainers fit the T springs perfectly and may be more available than the Ford tractor types.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 01:53 am:

Thanks Chuck. I was worried about the 1.56 values, but the clay test show that I have about 1/8" clearance to the head, so I think I am ok. I am running a low head on the speedster.

Charles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 12:00 am:

Like Kenny, I found the spiral fluted valve guide reamers to be very good. I recommend you do the reaming by hand using a tap wrench not an electric drill. Not the same experience with the lifter guide reamers. They are straight fluted and enlarge the hole. Careful as I was on the 12, I still reamed the lifter guides .0045" greater than the lifter diameter using the straight fluted reamers and a mill drill. Not good. Now I use a spiral fluted expansion reamerand ream by hand. On the 10 I got between .00175" and .002" total clearance on each one. Not bad for an old guy. Luckily for most of us the lifter bores are not worn excessively and do not require reaming.


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