Rust Prevention

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Rust Prevention
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 04:30 am:

I want to store parts in 1x12 pine boxes as I have a lot of board ends and can have them ready to move when I am ready. I was told once that a couple of pieces of charcoal put in a box would absorb moisture and prevent rust. Has anyone tried it or any suggestions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 09:23 am:

charcoal will absorb moisture, better yet is those little silica packs, the ones that say do not eat on them!!! wrap the part in cotton cloth, when it is warm, and you should be fine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By DMC on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 03:07 pm:

Wrapping parts in cloth is a bad idea- if the cloth gets damp, the moisture stays close to the metal and will rust the part worse than doing nothing to it. Just my experience.
Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By aaron on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 03:29 pm:

I would not wrap anything.
Put in a piece of charcoal, it can't hurt.
Use silica too if you can get some.
Deoending on the part, I'd spray them with a mixture of oit and kerosene or just spray with penetrating oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tman on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 07:50 pm:

Go to a marine shop and pick up a spray can of fogging oil put on a light coat and put them away


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 08:33 pm:

Dennis,
Unfortunately for the T parts, you live in a damp place. Cold metal attracts condensation. The above ideas are all good ones. You need to store in a shed or garage where it is protected from the rain. I would leave space between the wood so that it can "breathe" I am retired from the telephone company, and all those above ground pedestals on the buried cables also attract condensation. They have vents which are sheltered from direct rain, but will allow air to go in and out. That way the delicate wires inside don't corrode. You also need to replace the packets from time to time, because as they draw moisture, they will become saturated and no longer work.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 09:18 pm:

Dennis, There is a very good lubricant with a great rust inhibitor in it. Try http://x-19a.com/ ...this is really good stuff, I have used it for couple of years with great results. Don't think it is sold in stores, only on the net. It really works.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George P. Clipner on Monday, December 29, 2008 - 01:27 am:

How long are you talking about for storage ??? 1 or 2 yrs, 5 to 10 ? Are the parts already painted ? How big are the parts. If small enough to put in a ziplock bag, get a freezer bag with good zip, throw in a couple small bags of silcagel packs and suck out as much air as poss, should do the trick for several years. I had to put some antique firearms into long term storage. The people at Brownell's advised a waxy coating, similar to Cosmoline and put in wood box. paint the box on the outside for moisture resistance, chalk all internal seams w/silicon, including lid, when closing. Include silcagel bags to remove moisture from enclosed air in box. They also sell these waxy looking tabs that emit a corrosion proofing gas that also helps protect. When I was finally able to move the guns and take out of storage, after 12yrs, they appeared as if I had just put them away for two weeks. Worked very well in a damp, humid Midwestern basement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Monday, December 29, 2008 - 02:29 pm:

Most of the parts are not painted. Everything is stored in the dry now but I am looking at everything from small engine and electrical parts to blocks, to axle housings. Anything for T. Over 60 boxes 12x12x24 for those items that will fit in them. Different shapes for other things, radiators, flywheel transmission assemblies, steering gears ,hoods, doors, all types of parts. When I go to move them I want to be able to stack as much as possible to conserve space and not have everything tangled together and damaged. May be 2-3 years but I will be able to locate things by labeling boxes. Better than trying to find what I have right now.


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