Cycle car photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Cycle car photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, January 01, 2009 - 10:33 pm:

Does any one know anything about this car?


http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-early-race-car-photo_W0QQitemZ370137040366QQcmdZView ItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item370137040366&_trksid=p3911.c0.m14&_trkparms =72%3A1205|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas J. Miller "Tom" on Thursday, January 01, 2009 - 10:53 pm:

I believe it's French. It's very similar to one sitting in my friend's shop in New York state. He's restoring it for someone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By nugh chalmers on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 12:27 am:

Looks like a scripps-booth circa 1913,there is one like it in a barn near my home, not for sale yet. maybe soon I hope. It has a pointed front just like the picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Williamson on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 09:17 pm:

Would the gentleman posting about the Scripps Booth near his home, please contact me?
Thanks
Richard
rwill1914@aol.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Drake on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:16 pm:

I recall reading a very long time ago (early 80's?) a story about how Henry Ford considered building a cyclecar to compete with cars slotting in below the T in price. I think there was even a picture or two of a prototype.

Anyone remember what I'm talking about? I believe he abandoned the whole thing because he planned to just continuously make T's cheaper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:42 pm:

The way I remember it the story was is the Times or the Vintage Ford. It was about 1914. The cycle cars were a new concept that might give Ford more competition. Henry had one prototype car built and even left it be seen on the streets of Detroit. The fact that Ford was considering building a cycle car was enough to get the competition to give up. The car was lost to storage in a warehouse and was in the article because it had been recently found. I suppose someone with an index for those magazines could look up cycle car and find what I am referring to.
Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Niedzielski on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:48 pm:

You would think the maker would have put on a shroud over the chain drive. Imagine the oil/muck that would come flying off the chain at high speed, not to mention the danger of a youngster touching the exposed chain that is within reach.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas J. Miller "Tom" on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 11:47 pm:

The Ford cycle car was on display in the Henry Ford Museum for many years. The story plaque in front of it also noted Ford's intent to scare the other manufacturers out of business. I believe it left the museum collection in an auction back in the eighties. During this time, Edsel's limousine, the Lincoln limousine used for the King of England's visit, and many other items considered outside of the scope of the collection were sold off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 12:48 am:

Ed
actually it was a belt drive if you look closely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 01:40 am:

"outside the scope of the collection"???? I remember some of the de-accessions and wondered what was going on. Yes, I am familiar with the terminology, as I am a museum curator. large museum collections need to be watched over by a group, lest a single person influence the collection with a non-objective agenda (or a lack of understanding of the objects' significance.
T'ake care,
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 03:32 am:

It is a Scrips-Booth. At first I thought it was a French Bedelia but they were usually steered from the back seat. The Scrips-Booth was a copy of the Bedelia and was designed with rear steering but changed during early production to front seat steering.

The French Bedelia had the transmission shifting controls in the front seat up by the engine but was steered from the back seat. Need I say more ? They were at it many years ago. Later on they change to all rear controls. The Scrips-Booth had the controls in the rear and that is why the front drive pulley is so far back. Some cycle cars had a belt the length of the car. Cycle cars went out of production in 1918 after WW I


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 06:59 am:

Frank, maybe the Bedelia was the birthplace of the first "steering committee"? (nyuk, nyuk, nyuk)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 12:31 pm:

My somewhat talented oldest brother plays with small engines, and he came up with a Smith Motor Wheel, so built a car from a picture.



He tore it down later because he didn't have a place to store it. . It looked better than the Briggs Motor Wheel at the Towe.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 12:33 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vince M on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 06:00 pm:

Just came up on shorpys. http://www.shorpy.com/node/5329?size=_original


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vince M on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 06:20 pm:

If you look close its a briggs and stratton

vince


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 08:44 pm:

It started out as the Smith, with a one-horse engine, in about 1916. Sold in 1919 to Briggs & Stratton, who doubled the oomph to two horsepower. In maybe 1923, became the Auto Red Bug. Some may have had electric motors. If you read the post about the Smart Car, including the folks who wouldn't want to drive one on an Interstate, and then imagine doing so in one of these - - - .

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:00 pm:

You dont see many Motor wheels of either brand.
If you look at a PB Briggs,it is similar as that is why Briggs bought Smith out.For the engine design for small stationary engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:21 pm:

A docent at the Towe Museum said he got to drive their Motor Wheel around the parking lot, and said it was most thrilling. .

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Albert Gonzaz on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 01:56 am:

Ricks
"My somewhat talented oldest brother"
I say your brother is very good, it is a shame he had to dismantle it.


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