Do it yourself?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Do it yourself?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 02:16 am:

The other day there was a snarky remark about trying to do a job oneself to save a couple of bucks. Rather than fill a lot of space here, I'll give the URL to my two cents:

http://www.dauntlessgeezer.com/DG71.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By EDWARD R. LEVY on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 02:26 am:

Jeff,
Ithought your comments on doing things yourself were right on the mark. I've enjoyed my time spent working on
model Ts including making mistakes & seeking help . Have a great new yyear
Edward R.
Levy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 08:57 am:

Too right! Let us not forget that the professional may not have time to fiddle about getting things 'just so' - he's got a shop full of stuff to get out of the door by the end of the day. Amateurs can take extra time & care.

And as you point out, they are not encouraged to use 'lateral thinking' aka 'shadetree engineering'. I am forever going into parts shops & being told 'No, can't help, it's not in the book' - then I ask to be let loose in the shelves and come out with an item I can use - 'well, oo'd a thought you could use a Citroen part on a Ford!'

I like the challenge of fixing it myself and learning new skills - I think that applies to nearly everyone reading the Forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Calloway on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 09:08 am:

Steve,
I agree with Edward, your remarks "are on the money". Ed, I love the Packard. This hobby would have died long ago if no one was willing to "do it themselves". I've been working with engines since I was a teenager, everything from Briggs and Stratton to Cat Diesels, but that is credentials for nothing. I applaud anyone who tackles a job themselves, and if they end up doing it twice or thrice to get it right, so what? I HAVE learned a lot on this forum and I think it's great that some very knowledgeable people take the trouble to share that knowledge. To you guys who seek advice (as I do) on this forum, don't let the Bobs of the world dampen your spirit or your interest. Tinker on! There are some good people from all walks of life here with a genuine interest in the hobby. It's seldom I read this forum and don't learn something. As far as people who find a need to make themselves feel good by making others feel bad, I hope you crank your T with the spark advanced, if you even have one!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 09:51 am:

More than one "pro" on this Forum has been found lacking in some areas of knowledge that many hobbyists have known and proven.

As for cranking, Joe:

Left is Right;
Right is Wrong:
Learn this Right,
or howl this song:
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUHHHHHHHHHHHH!

Left arms pullin' up are never broken by Model T cranks.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 09:56 am:

Neither are right heels pressing the starter button.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 10:14 am:

Just don't put fingers inside the tranny while a
floorboard can slip over the starter button...

BTDT, but digits were undamaged.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harvey Decker on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 11:22 am:

Hello Steve:

Enjoy your dauntlessgeezer sight.

Dick Lane? I can still see him (on a very small tv screen) calling the wrestling and roller derby from the Olympic Auditorium. Charlie 'Spec' Saunders ring a bell??

Happy New Year, Steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 11:39 am:

If you start up the T and put the lever in neutral forgot to turn on the gas and you have to get out and turn it on, be sure pull back the lever before you crank or you might have some unexpected movement!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 01:27 pm:

Very good points Steve. I see you're a man of many talents as well as the "Dauntless geezer".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 01:56 pm:

My kinda guy, Steve. My only modification to the "If you want something done right, do it yourself" is a slight deviation that I've used for projects where I lacked equipment to do the job myself.

In this case, the saying is, "If you want something done right, buy a dozen doughnuts for them and let the guys down in the machine shop do it." ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 10:37 pm:

Yep,I can aggree with ye on what you said.
Sometimes you can do a better job than a pro if you are carefull and mindfull.Pro's tend to take shortcuts.If you are inexperianced,you dont know those shortcuts.
It aint T but my 47 Pontiac I bought last June is a rust bucket.Runs and drives but needs trunk and floor pans.I added up what all that would cost that I could buy,and it was awfull.I wound up buying me a few sheets of 18 gauge steel,and today a American made Plasma cutter.I will build my own floor pans and trunk floor.Yea,it will cost me the same being I bought that plasma cutter,but that tool will help me fix alot of other stuff for years to come.gota find me a decent,preferabley used US made, sheet metal brake.
I use that basic idea on alot of what I do.I just buy the tools to do a job myself and useally I save a little money,learned a new skill and the tools can be used again and again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stanzione on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 11:11 pm:

It is always easy to lose sight of certain facts when these contests begin. What I find most interesting is that many forget that the pro's were not always pro's. Most at one point or another was a snotty nose kid, an impatient young adult, a middle age rookie, or an old geezer that devloped a desire to learn and become a pro. What did they do to become a pro? They read books, experimented, experienced, failed, succeeded, practiced and eventually got good at what they do. No matter where you fit in this arena, there is not one single pro out there that hasn't been in the same place. I prefer to see myself and many of my friends who work on these T's as pro's in the making.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 01:14 am:

Well said Steve, I like working on my stuff and I have made many mistakes - but got some right to and I like to think Iam learning along the way, also I just dont like the idea of driving these cars or any other of our old toys and not having any idea how stuff works. Its a good part of the experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dave willis on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 01:22 am:

hmmm....when was the last time soldering in a 3/4" piece of paper clip ever hurt anything??[or anyone].


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 08:02 am:

Who did Henry take his car to? Or did he just build it and repair it by trial and error?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 02:36 pm:

Hi all,
Jem's comment on lateral thinking & his adventure in a part house reminds me of one I had "way back when" and my primary transportation was a '39 Chev. . . Town Sedan (black, with fake tommy guns in the back window & license frame "Official Mafia Staff Car"). I wus goin' to college back then and had dire need of a wheel cylinder. Fortunately I had the Master Parts Interchange book and found that a late 50's part that was the same. Went into the parts house and first asked for the '39 part--which, of course, they didn't have--but they had the 50's part. Counter guy was NOT going to sell it to me, "It won't fit, kid!" I finally got him to bring it out, and showed him it had the same casting number as my part. Whew, got it finally! (and it fit like a glove). He was still grumbling when I went out the door. :-)
Hmm, I remember a cartoon showing an "old geezer" behind the parts counter saying, "What make you think we have antique car parts here!!"
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 06:32 pm:

That's like brake shoes for the '39 Packard. I had visions of having to mail order them or have them relined. I took the old ones into a local parts place where there was an old guy. He got out a book that had pictures of all the brake shoes. We found the ones that matched mine, and he went and got them off the shelf. That was when we had local parts dealers. I don't know if you could do that in one of these new chain stores.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steamboat on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 02:22 am:

I had a 57 Goliath for a while and the heater quit working. I pulled out the thermostat, took it to the dealer, he wanted 5 dollars and something for a new one. I picked it up and went to the family auto parts store, and asked if they had anything like this. He picked it up, looked at it, and came back with a small box. When he opened it, it was axactly the same thermostat. I picked up the box, on the side it said 49-58 Ford. The price was 85 cents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene in Surf City on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 04:58 pm:

If anyone passed clicking on the Steve Jeff link you are really missing a wonderful site. Go Check It Out


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome R. Hoffman, Hays KS on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 07:41 pm:

Hey Gene, do you Know Rick? He lives in Surf City too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Surf City Gene on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 02:18 pm:

Yes, Ralph is practically my next door neighbor. We used to live with the old Meadowlark airport separating us. BTW we met on this forum several years ago and now often drive our T's together. Most recent was a cold trip to the HME in Pasedena. RDR always follows me cause I can't keep up to him when I top out at about 60 in my '12 Torpedo. He's been a wealth of knowledge and drives his T daily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By EDWARD R LEVY on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 03:14 pm:

STEAMBOAT
I am 70 years old but I think I remember the Goliath being sold in St.Louis where I used to live by 0ne of those multi brand import car stores. Was it not a water cooled horizontally opposed 4 made in Germany, or have I got it confused with early Subarus ? Help refresh my memory, please.
Edward R. Levy
I was at the most 20-25 when the above occured


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 07:28 pm:

Edward,

Goliath was made by Borgward and they were nice little cars. My sister and her husband had 59 Goliath back in the early 60's It was a front wheel drive, water cooled, horizontally opposed 4 cylinder. I believe the patents/rights were sold to the Japanese and used in the early Subarus.

Walt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steamboat on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 01:54 pm:

Edward,

The 57 Goliath was a 2 cyl. 2 stroke, mechanical fuel injection, water cooled engine with a 4 speed transmission and front wheel drive put out by Borgward in Germany. It had a seperate oil pump for oil injection so it wasn't needed to mix oil and gas. It wasn't really a very nice car, it had the typical 2 stroke idle. When the 4 cylinder engine came out, in 1958, it was a big improvement. The 4 cylinder Goliath was actually a Porsche flat 4, but water cooled. The internal parts would interchange with the Porsche. I had the 57 because they were very cheap on the used car lots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 02:47 pm:

Steamboat,

I would have loved to have known that the 4 cylinder shared parts with the Porsche. We had to replace rod bearings but couldn't find a local dealer or parts so had babbitt poured in the rods. That was back in 1962 when the web wasn't available for part searches but there were machine shops that understood pouring bearings. :-)

The 59 was a cute little car with a comfortable leather interior. Performance was fair but not remarkable. It rode nice and was great in the snow.

Walt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steamboat on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 05:18 pm:

Walt,

The Goliath dealers knew about this. A friend of ours was overhauling his Porsche, and showed me his crankshaft. It said "Goliath".

And they were great in the snow. Once as I was going down a slight snow hill in traffic, a guy coming up stopped me and said, "I don't know what is going on, but your back wheels aren't turning." I had forgotten to release the park brake.


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