Old Micrometers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Old Micrometers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard G Goelz on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 11:55 am:

I was left these two Micrometers and wondered what they were used for,one has a rotary dial and a rubber"tire" on one end that turns the dial when rotatedit is marked Starett, pat march 28,1905.The other is also marked Starett and on the bottom with the notch is says "Kent-Moore" 1.200"-3.300" and 1.180"-BAR.Thanks Rick Old Tools


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 12:04 pm:

The top one is not a micrometer, it is a speed calculator for line shaft (or any turning shaft) the bottom one is for setting the cutters on a line boring machine. They are hard to find, I've looked for years for one for my K R Wilson combinatioin machine. This one was probably made for a Kent-Moore bar. It would bring pretty good money if you wanted to sell it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard G Goelz on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 12:14 pm:

Stan, thanks for the information, my grandfather was a Chevrolet dealer/ mechanic in the 20s and 30s until the depression that was when you sold them and fixed them in the small towns.The rotary one would go very fast on a shaft wouldn't it?i have not checked the movement in revolutions.Since i don't have any Kent-Moore anything i will probably sell it.
thanks again
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 12:36 pm:

The top one would have a little rubber pointed tip on it that could be held in the center point of a turning shaft such as a line shaft or machine running off a line shaft, a threshing machine drive belt, etc. By timing the number of turns of the little dial in a minute, it gives the revolutions per minute. At 100 RPM it would turn "button to button" once(look on the face at the two little buttons) at 1000 RPM it would turn ten times in a minute, at 2000 rpm it would turn 20 times, etc. You held it in your hand with your thumb on the button--point on the shaft-- and counted the number of times the moving button went under your thumb while holding your pocket watch in your other hand. Of course, you could just watch it, too. But many of these I have seen have the numbers on the dial about wore away from turning under a thumb. The other numbers around the dial are fractions or percents of a turn. I can't see in your picture but many of them have two sets of numbers, on for each direction of the turning shaft. In the book that came with them there is a chart of speeds for number of turns and fractions, etc. Somewhere in all my stuff I have a virtually new one of those in a box. They must have sold a million of them. I think every blacksmith and machinist would have had one, every steam engine operator, etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard G Goelz on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 01:03 pm:

Stan, it does have numbers going both ways and they are not worn,thanks for the info on how it works ,i will try it on a small slow motor.I sent you a e-mail off forum.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Gaffrey on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:10 pm:

Stan. What is the dia of the KR Wilson bar?
Would something like this do you any good?
It would have to be calibrated, as the thimble starts out at 1.500.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:16 pm:

Some of the KR bars are 1.125, some are 1.065, some are 1 inch. That looks like something I could make work, I've never seen a real K R Wilson one so I don't know exactly what they look like.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:16 pm:

Actually, that would be 1.0625, wouldn't it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:18 pm:

And that would be ..........wouldn't it? Old and senile.

Just came in from trying to start the neighbor lady's 1981 Plymouth Reliant. She is from Cameroon, doesn't understand cold weather very well, let alone ten below and the wind blowing. She is a preacher so I have to watch my mouth, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:25 pm:

I have one of those tachometers NOS in the box, complete with instructions, somewhere in the garage. It was the type used for crypto teletype machines, among other things.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:27 pm:

Rod
That micrometer shown looks pretty good.
So if it is calibrated to start at 1.5" it must be for something like a 1 1/4" bar.
Anyway if you are prepare to part with it and Stan passes please let me know and I will buy it for the local T club to use with the club's equipment
I would recalibrate it to use with a 1 1/16" bar (Stan I can do fractions faster that i can write decimals).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 05:27 pm:

Stan, those are the fun ones to teach swear words, but with wrong meanings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 12:30 am:

The tachometer (shown above) was quite an important tool in agriculture in the olden days. As mentioned above it was used to set the cylinder speed of the thrashing machine, which was very crucial, so it didn't shatter the grain and to adjust the fan speed so it didn't blow the grain out with the straw. Also used to adjust truck and tractor governors,and all of the above. Excellent post Stan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Iversen on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 12:47 am:

I have Starett revolution counter that's not been used since my father retired as a saw mill builder/operator many years ago. I'd happily trade it for a replacement of the 2" mic that walked away from my tailgate at the last Auburn swap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 06:14 pm:

I have the same model Starrett tachometer.



It was my wifes grandfathers. He worked at the Thomas B. Jeffery plant in Kenosha and the Mitchell Plant in Racine in the early teens. Never was quite sure of how it worked, but suspected that it was a timed device. You'd need a good pocket watch with the tach.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 12:53 pm:

I think they must still make the rev counter, or at least have made it within the last few years. I bought one a few years back that was practically brand new. It came in a plastic pouch rather than a nice felt lined wooden box, so I doubt it is too old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 02:37 pm:

Hi All

Further to the comments, and if I may break in (as a visitor enjoying this web site)
Rick has a Starrett 106 “Improved Speed Indicator”, and as shown has the concave tip for pointed end shafts attached. It would have also had a convex tip for use with centered shafts.
A #109 surface speed wheel was available separately.
What many users are sometimes not aware of, is the rotating disc is clutch driven, and can be moved with your thumbnail to line up the two buttons, and then held in place with thumb pressure until your watch second hand comes to whatever point you want to start timing at.
Then by relaxing pressure on the disc, you can count the button rotations and either stop the disc again or remove from the shaft at given time to read the remainder.

Mike has the model 104, which does not have the clutch feature.
Also available was a model 107, which would also register the revolutions.

1930 Prices
104 – without leather case $1.25 – with case $2.60
106 – without leather case $1.85 – with case $3.20
107 – without leather case $3.60 – with case $5.10
109 – surface speed adapter wheel $0.60

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 03:26 pm:

Hi Hal

I should add that if yours is a model 104 that does have the clutch feature, it is a newer version, and would likely have a black crinkle finish on the body.

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 05:14 pm:

Got me wondering. I'll try to think to look tonight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:38 pm:

Art,

Mine is a Model 107. No crinkle finish. It appears to be chrome or maybe nickel plated. The handle is black plastic or bakelite like the one in the first photo. I don't know how old it is, but it has a soft plastic pouch which holds the counter and two tips. It came in the typical Starrett cardboard box with a one page sheet of instructions. I bought it second hand, but it is like brand new. Any idea how old it might be?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By AJ on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 10:48 pm:

Hi Hal

I’m not sure when the red plastic pouch was introduced, but they were pretty much the norm when
I worked for a Starrett dealer in the 60’s and 70’s.
My 104 came in a cardboard box, and is shown in the Feb 1965 price list as “No Case Available”.
The same price list shows the 106 and 107 as “Red Plastic Case Extra”.
As I mentioned in my earlier post, the 107 registered the dial revs by using the little spring pointer to hold
the inner dial until the button came around to lift the pointer, allowing the register dial to move one notch.
The 104 and 107 were still listed in the 1994 catalog, and although the part numbers are still shown on their website, I could not bring them up.

Regards
Art


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