Line Boring the 11 Main Block

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Line Boring the 11 Main Block
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 06:33 pm:

Sorry Les, Rod, Stan, et al: I just couldn't resist this diversion.

I first received the email about the world's largest combustion engine several years ago, and now it's going around again.
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The worlds biggest engine is the Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C. It is a turbo charged two stroke diesel engine and it is the most powerful and efficient low revolution engine in the world today. The Wartsila-Sulser is manufactured by the Aioi Works in Japan and is part of Japans Diesel United Ltd engine manufacturers.


Below is an 89 foot long 44 foot wide 12 cylinder engine, literally as big as a house !


The image below depicts the 300 ton crankshaft of the 10 cylinder engine. You may notice here that there are steps on the wall Of the casing to climb down into the engine's sump !


Despite the colossal amounts of power output produced by these engines, surprisingly low wear rates have actually been recorded. Cylinder liner wear for example is only about 0.03 mm down for every 1000 hours of engine use.

It must be remembered here that these engines work at about 20 times slower than a normal 2.0 Litre car engine and this is a major Contributor to the life of the engine.



These engines are built in 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 cylinder configurations. All the engines are straight or 'inline'. The diameter of each cylinder is 3 foot 2 inches with a stroke of 8 foot 2 inches. The 12 cylinder version weighs in at 2000 metric tons and delivers 90,000 Horse Power at 100 Revs per minute, with best fuel economy at 53,244 HP at 90 Rpm.
When I mention economy, the 14 cylinder engine for example with a displacement of 25,480 Litres ( 1.56 million cubic inches ) burns up 1,660 gallons of crude ("bunker") oil every hour.. ------------------------- The Mathematical calculation : 1,660 gallons/per hour = 39.5 barrels of crude oil/used per hour = $2,844. These figures are worked out from the basis of crude oil @ $72 a barrel*.
$2,844 every hour the engine runs or 27.6 Gallons which is $46.00 every minute or 76 cents a second! That is of course if the ships buy oil at trade price...if not then these figures are the absolute minimum.
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Know what's wrong with their talk of low wear from low rpm?

At 98 inches stroke and 100 rpm, the piston speed is about the same as a Model T engine at 2500 rpm.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard Tobias on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 08:03 pm:

What is this big engine used for?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 08:45 pm:

Oh, sorry; I didn't copy the whole email:

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These large engines are designed to power the worlds super oil tankers and large container ships. They are built to the ship owners' preferences. They usually request an engine construction of a single unit and single propeller design for ease of maintenance, and not surprisingly any later troubleshooting. A single unit and single screw design has also proved over time to have a longer life span than double or even quad screws.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas J. Miller "Tom" on Saturday, January 03, 2009 - 08:47 pm:

It's a marine engine for a container ship. http://gcaptain.com/maritime/blog/emma-maersk-engine/the-worlds-largest-marine-d iesel/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Boyers on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 10:57 pm:

Had a chance to visit the Fairbanks engine company years ago. At one time they were the biggest for size, but the Japanese upped the pot. They weld steel plate together to make their crankcases with doors in the side to inspect the cylinders. The crankshafts were cast and used an aluminum connecting rod with no bearing. Quite a sight to see.


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