Ruxtel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Ruxtel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 04:08 pm:

I cant get into the word search, can someone tell me what year the ruxtel was approved by Ford?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 05:11 pm:

Try using the word Ruckstell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 06:07 pm:

Still cannot find the date even with the right spelling!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 06:15 pm:

Paul, I was having problems using more then one work in keyword search. Just try the one word.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By morris dillow on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 08:09 pm:

1913 in a Ford garage in california


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 01:01 am:

Thanks morris,

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 11:29 am:

Posting under your real name, Moe? What gives? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 11:41 am:

Hall Scott / Perfecto two speed axles came to be available around 1919 or 20.

Ruckstell bought the company and renamed it after himself in or about 1921.

There is a factory Ford letter to dealers as early as 1925 (see the encyclopedia) talking about a price reduction for the T and TT assemblies available from Ruckstell, so one would assume that the Ruckstell had been considered an approved aftermarket accesory for dealers to sell at that time.

Ford included the Ruckstell Axle assembly in its 1928 parts catalog.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 12:48 pm:

As Royce mentioned above, I've heard for years that there are Ford parts books with Ruckstell parts in them, but have never seen one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.Boer on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 02:20 pm:

On our Ruckstel axel on a square plate is standing :
E 7999
Hall Scott Motor Car Com
Does someone knows how old that axel is
Toon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 03:15 pm:

Larry

Same with me, the MTFCI members only library has 2 late Parts and Price Lists scanned, these are original, dated May 1 1929 and one from 1930 and no Ruckstell parts are listed. Same with earlier '25 parts list scanned on that site.

However, the 'reprint' by Polyprints of my Aug 5, 1928 Ford Parts and Price List book has the last 6 pages of a Ruckstell parts and prices (the pages numbered 2-6 at the top, while the rest of the Ford Parts List is page numbered in another manner, spelling out the page name as 'fifty-four' etc.)

Now maybe that was placed there by the publisher? Or it was part of the Ford 1928 list?

In any event, one page of that listing for Ruckstell parts mentions to get parts only from 'Authorized Ford Dealer'. So perhaps Henry let his Ford dealers sell these axles and parts, but not likely were these axles installed at Ford branches when the Fords were assembled.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Tuesday, January 06, 2009 - 03:37 pm:

A few years ago Glen Chaffin wrote a comprehensive article on Grover Ruxstell and his Model T two speed axle and it appeared in the Vintage Ford magazine.
Most of the questions being asked are covered in this article.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 03:23 am:

As far as I know, no cars were equipped with Ruckstell axles before they arrived at the dealership. I believe many of the Ford garages kept a revolving inventory of them ready to go under a car, on a slow day they would build up a Ruckstell axle and switch it out for one when the customer wanted one. Many cars at the dealerships were equipped with them at the time of sale of a new car. One of my theories, although I have no proof of this, is that Henry approved the Ruckstell for Model T's because he knew that whatever new car they built to follow the T would have a selective gear transmission in it and shifting a Ruckstell would get owners ready for shifting a gear type transmission. I've seen a lot of old ads where the price of a new Ford was advertised as "Fully equipped with starter, generator, Ruckstell, spare tire and full tank of gas, etc."

Ruckstell never sold the Ruckstell as an assembled unit. They sold it as a kit to be installed. Part of the reason for the success of the Ruckstell was that it continued to use mostly Ford parts, all that was added was the reduction unit. Their instructions for installation were to install it under the car, not removing the driveshaft, pinion gear right side housing, etc., The left side housing was to be removed, the standard unit removed, the standard internal parts replaced with the Ruckstell unit and the new left side housing installed under the car, the spring hooked back up, the wheels replaced and it was a done deal. They claimed it could be installed in less than an hour by an experienced mechanic. I don't know about an hour but it shouldn't have taken more than two. If you do it that way it really isn't much of a job. They didn't worry about clearances, they were installing new parts so there was no inspection time, etc. It takes: Two hubcaps, two axle nuts, remove two wheels, one brake rod, one spring shackle, 7 parting line bolts, 3 spool bolts and the unit is out. Then there are 10 ring gear bolts, 3 carrier bolts and it is totally apart. To assemble: Six carrier bolts, 10 ring gear bolts and it is ready to go back in. Seven parting line bolts, 3 spool bolts, one spring shackle, one brake rod, two axle nuts, two hubcaps. Done. Fill with grease. Install shifter. Connect rod.

In Herman & Freida there is a pretty comprehensive description of installing a Ruckstell as Einar and Torvald install one in "Freida Learns to Drive." They do it the way I described above, under the car. As you know if you've read the book, the Yustermierson boys have a business of installing Ruckstells and testing coils.

I'll bet taking the floor boards out and cutting the slot for the shifter took about as long as changing the ring gear over. I have a set of Ruckstell speed wrenches. If I wasn't so fat I'll bet I could have one on the bench in 20 minutes all by myself just using the Ruckstell wrenches, let alone an air impact. I'm so fat and stiff it takes me 20 minutes to get under the car and back up anymore.

In answer to the original question, as near as I have been able to find, the first Ruckstells went on the market in 1921. They sold about 750,000 of them in the next 6 years. They cost $62.50 from Montgomery Ward in 1925. Most Ford dealers charged $75.00 to install one in a new Ford. I am, by the way, working on number 31, 32, 33 & 34. Doing one for Paul and three to go to Chickasha. Better go to bed so I can get up in the morning and get to work on them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 01:02 pm:

Stan: Fat or not, the hard part is getting up off that creeper when done!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 02:01 pm:

Yep! I have this B & B disease so bad I can't work under a car anymore. That's my belly and my bifocals. By the time I get a car high enough off the ground to roll my belly under it I can't see anything through my bifocals. I think you have the beginnings of that, Larry. I know Mike Walker has it and Fred and Bud Scudder and a couple other guys are coming down with it. At least that's the way it looked to me in Centerville. =) Could be a sign of too many years of living high on the hog.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 05:14 pm:

Try lazic Stan, I went from 20 400 to 20 20 in one eye and by choice 20 40 in the other. It works like bifocals, and rarely wear reading glasses anymore. Best 2 grand I have spent in my life. After you qualify about fifteen minuets does it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 05:18 pm:

Thanks, Paul, it is actually just a joke. I am blessed with excellent eyesite, wear five dollar Costco glasses for doing close up work and Serengeti Sun Glasses with no correction most of the time. Just had my eyes checked and they recommended no glasses. Not bad for pushing 70. The belly is not a joke. Been trying to lose some of that. Tough to do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 06:39 pm:

Stan they say a really good piece of hemp rope tied tightly will help cure some of that? (Never tried it myself,but it should work)(G)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 07:08 pm:

Tied tightly where???? Around my neck???? That would probably work. I'm not going to try it.

Notice it's always the guys that are so skinny they have to wear galluses to keep their drawers up that have most advice on losing weight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 07:10 pm:

It 's hard to be humble...(G) It'd be your rope,tie it wherever you think it would do the most good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 11:49 pm:

OK friends....I had to go and look up a 'gallus' since I'm an East Coast boy thru and thru.

Leads me to ask a question of the well informed....what is the benefit of using the belt loop shackle clips as shown on a google check of gallus, over what we find here in the East that have the alligator jaw eccentric clips that pinch the waistband?

I have a problem...38 inch waist and 36 inch butt...don't like the unexpected wedgies that bib overalls have caused :-) and unless I use something to hold the britches up there are cases when I lift something heavy and high and then can only grin when someone finds the britches down at my ankles. :-(

Galluses appear to be pretty neat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 11:53 pm:

George,Dad used to say "Never trust a man who wears suspenders and a belt. He's never sure of anything" I feel your pain as I'm getting the same way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 12:14 am:

I'm new here and my forum etiquette is terrible about going off topic but you guys started it. A friend of mine had bifocals in the top of his glasses so he could see laying under his car or working on a hoist. I too have been accused of being built like, "the last bite on a Popsicle". It takes a lot of courage to get old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 12:36 am:

"Fat or not, the hard part is getting up off that creeper when done!"

Hey Larry, that's why I park mine close together in the garage. I come up for air between them and use the fenders to hoist my big keester up off the creeper.

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 10:06 am:

"Double Bifocals" work great. That's what John Berch is describing. Really popular with electricians and plumbers or anyone who has to look up at nearby objects.

George, how can a fella get wedgies from bib overalls?!! These were standard issue in my family (we dairy farmed) and I still wear them on weekends and other days off and whenever I drive my T. If you're getting wedgies, you're wearing 'em too high. Think of them as agricultural ghetto pants but don't let the crotch drop THAT low ;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 10:16 am:

"agricultural ghetto pants" LOL!

It sure would be nice if those would become the new fad around here...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 01:11 pm:

Warren :-)

Guess you use a creeper all the time when under the car, eh?

Try bibs without a creeper, tight space using your back and shoulder blades to 'walk' back out. Then find yourself halfway out when the wedgie decides to bite :-):-):-) BTDT...too many times! Need something more flexible and forgiving...lol

As far as 'agricultural ghetto pants', I will share a story. Had a neighbor a little while back. Guy had an IQ off the charts, but his life skills score was lower than a gnats. Wife was a doctor so he was Mr. Mom as the kiddles came along. He dabbled in day trading to the point he had direct satellite feed to his house from NYSE because the cable feed was 15 minutes delayed and that was actually costing him money due to timing in his opinion. Seriously, this guy was so life skilled impaired [hold a saw stiff armed and jump up and down to cut; bought a new mower and thought that little twist oil cap was where the gasoline went, was so difficult to deal with that none of the pool cleaners in the area would deal with him so he finally called a bulldozer and had the cope tipped in the pool and backfilled and sodded, etc.]

'James' was also a real GQ sort of guy! 365 days a year, rain or shine, snow or sleet, his uniform of the day was bib overalls over a bare chest, no socks, and untied wing tips..and when the weather was cold and I do mean cold...no coat! Also had a bad habit of seeing my garage door open and casually wander about and when he would see feet beneath a T simple say, "hello, whatcha doing?" and scare the heck out of me!

Yeah, too bad, was a fun neighbor, his wife got promoted to a Chief of Staff position at a famous NYC hospital and they moved. House has changed hands twice since and I love meeting the new neighbors. Part of my styck is....wanna have an in ground Ester Williams Olympic sized pool on the cheap? Bring a shovel and I'll show you where! :-):-):-):-)

That said, I do realize that 'James' was NOT the poster child for the bib overall market, but does make me still giggle whenever I think of him.


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