Brazing Trans. Drums

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Brazing Trans. Drums
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By larry on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 09:29 pm:

I have a reverse drum that shows 2 small craks on the inside web [not drum surface]
Can i repair and use this drum or just get a new one?
I have worked on trans that have the drum brazed repaired and it was still useable when i opened the tranny
Thank you ,.Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 10:49 pm:

Bad idea. A cracked cast iron drum is scrap. Sorry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Wednesday, January 07, 2009 - 10:52 pm:

Just a couple thoughts.
1. You'd have a balance problem. Some are terribly out of balance from the factory. Brazing would add material and make matters worse. I would want to balance it afterwards.
2. A brazed joint is not strong. No assurance the repair would hold up.
That said, I too have seen earlier Ford drums brazed. Eg NRS Fords. You do what you have to do. If it were me, I'd find another drum. If you are concerned about gear mesh, remove the gear sleeve and install it on a new drum. I 've done that before.
Another thought comes to mind. Just where are the cracks? Cracks at the rivets don't bother me. Those in the webbing do.
Must be someone out there with a decent drum they would sell you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Simon Bayley on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 07:37 pm:

Hi all, while on the subjust of brazing... I have a 25 styled narrow wth removable shoes that has been brazed on the surface of the drum where a small chip has been repaired.

Any thoughts if this is usable of not? I will try and get a picture posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 10:03 pm:

I'm not sure why everyone keeps saying a brazed joint is not strong. At around 90,000psi, it's certainly no less strong than any 30,000psi cast iron. The trick is to braze it correctly. Use a nickel-bearing silver brazing alloy rod such as AG9 and follow the proper procedure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 08:38 am:

Or use Harris Safety-Silv 45 silver solder with the proper flux. Again, way stronger than cast iron.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 05:46 pm:

I didn't think you could silver solder cast iron.This is what I was always taught,though I may be wrong.Please elaborate with details as I find this interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 06:04 pm:

Darren,

google muggyweld

they have a bunch on their site including 'how to' videos


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By larry on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 08:48 pm:

This is great,. I dug the drum out of the garbage
The gear is great, but for the crack its a beauty of a drum
IT CAN BE DONE......
Thank you all

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nelson Jones on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 11:23 pm:

You should not braze a drum because Henry did not braze any so it would not be original. Nelson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 11:45 pm:

We don't deduct points over here in the MTFCA land. (Arn't you glad?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 09:47 pm:

Use a file to mark the rod every 1/2 inch. Count the total marks before you start,and if your like me, Write It Down. Make the weld and count what you have left. Put the same amount 180 to the weld. May not get you to the Moon, but has worked for me for 45 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:24 pm:

I aint done alot of research on it lately but there is cast iron ingot rod that works well for repairing broken cast iron parts.
I to,have allways been taught brazeing wasnt as strong as regular welding.And that it didnt hold paint.
Cleanliness is a problem with what you will be welding as it has been in oil for years.
Brass will expand and contract at different rates than the castiron.But I dont know if the parts will git hot enough for that to become a factor in this repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 12:45 am:

Harris Safety-Silv 45 silver solder with the proper flux works well with cast iron. The problem is to heat the drum uniformly so it doesn't crack when it cools. Try it, see what you think.

However, Royse is correct, when you consider the effort in removing the engine and the work required to fix it,it would be better to get another drum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By EDWARD R. LEVY on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 01:34 am:

If I am not mistaken, any of the above fixes require removale of tyhe engine/trans from the car. All things considered & assuming that the NEW drums are of top quality it seems sensible to me to swallow the additional cost & use a new drum.They are so central to the operation of the vehicle that it seems better to replace rather than repair them. Please understand that I am not making light of the repair options just that they are not the best choice if the new drums are a top quality product.
EDWARD R. LEVY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 10:51 am:

What's wrong with riveting another good used drum on the existing gear sleeve? You maintain the established tooth contact and bore. Seems to me that's the way to go.


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