Daily Driver Model-T?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Daily Driver Model-T?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erin Lassley on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 04:25 pm:

Hello all - first time poster. My grandfather passed away last week at the age of 91 and one of his dreams was to have a model T like he and his brother and father used to work on at Lewiston, NE at the Hillers Brothers garage in the early 1900s. In his memory, I'd like to find me a model T to restore and since I have more time than money, a project car is probably what I'll end up with. I live in a small town and so call me crazy but I want to use it as a daily driver. My fiance loves the idea and the thought of cruising around in 100 year old technology that I can repair and fix, in my grandpa's honor, does me a lot of good. I'm a VW Bug mechanic so I think a model T is well within my realm of ability. Can anyone help me out or shed some advice my direction? Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 04:46 pm:

Erin,

You should join the nearest Model T club and then ask around for a T project that fits your needs. A Model T is good reliable transportation, equal to any volksbuggen. You won't get there fast, but everywhere you go people will smile.

Check here for local club listings:
http://www.mtfca.com/MTclubs.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 05:47 pm:

Erin,

I did a search and didn't find your name/phone in Nebraska, so I can't be of much help. However, it appears you may be in the Fresno area, so there should be a lot of "T'ers" in your vicinity (if that is the case).



Good luck :-),

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brett Larson on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 06:11 pm:

The first thing I think of (probably since I'm an insurance agent) is to make sure that your insurance policy covers the vehicle while being used as a daily driver. Most collector car companies restrict use to a certain annual mileage limit and also forbid using vehicles to run errands or drive to work. If a claim would happen while you were driving to work, and they found ANY evidence to support this, they would deny the claim.

With some companies, you can add your collector car to your regular auto policy; they just insure it based on the stated value, and then there should be no usage restrictions. I'm thinking about adding mine to my regular veh. pol, as I tend to bend the rules quite a bit on my current policy, and would hate to have something happen to it and have a claim denied. I would love to drive mine to work more this summer when it is warm...plus the stench of burnt oil and carbon on my clothes tends on to give me a little more "personal space" at work!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 12:39 pm:

I had my modern truck in the shop recently, and had to drive my '25 pickup for two weeks as a daily driver. Other than being cold, it worked out fine for two weeks. I used it day and night, as required.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 05:20 am:

Model T's are great to drive daily... I've done it quite a bit. Given some compression they will climb hills too.

Welcome to the enlightend motoring movement... I mean the car of the century beats driving a poxwagen;)

Cheers

Anthony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 05:52 am:

Brett is on the button. I use my 27 Tudor every opportunity I get. I did drive it to work every chance I got, solved that problem I retired.
Of course being retired, gives me more time to be on the street with it.
Now that it has a new engine and it's even more reliable I'm driving it more.
Make sure you are covered! I'm going to do what I have to, to be.
Specialty car insurance companies are in business for "special" cars, they make money by restricting "special" cars from "ordinary" use.
Here's an exaple. the military museum I work at was given a Viet Nam era, 2 1/2 ton Army truck a "Duce and a Half". Several specialty car Ins. Co's. have said the would insure it BUT.....
#1. It MUST be garaged. (it was built to sit in the jungles of Viet Nam when it was new?)
#2. It's a troop transporter with the benches in the back but we can't carry "troops" (people) in the back?).
Of course these things can be "fixed" for a price and that price is going to look a whole lot more like what you are paying for daily transportation cars.
Here's something else. IF you don't register and insure it as an "antique" you could be "liable" for not staying inside the "antique" exclusion of seat belts, air bags, crash bumpers, folding steering wheels, (get the picture?)
Insurance companies are Not in BUSINESS to pay clams, that's an occupational hazard.
BE SURE to do your homework about any insurance you buy. If you must, make them define every word in the policy before you purchase it.
At the very least, your financial future might depend on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:25 am:

From what I've seen, specialty car insurance is really just Collision and Comprehensive. . It depends on your daily driver's policy to cover you for Public Liability and Property Damage to others.

Since I won't spend a nickel on Collision and Comprehensive insurance, and since I don't have another car for every driver in the household, I cover the ol' brass picup with the same liability only policy as the wife's car.

Insurance companies in Calif don't care what you drive, in regard to PL & PD. I'm not even sure they care if it's licensed. Only the VIN number is on the policy, not the license. Although they attach the policy to the vehicle, they are just insuring the driver.

If your insurance company has liability restrictions for your modern car, they apply to your antique, too, regardless of the specialty policy. Please tell us what you've found in your Florida policies, Dennis.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:39 am:

Brakes: even the best are barely good enough. . If you never ever have to make a panic stop, T brakes will get by. It's just a band in the transmission, you know.

Yellow lights here seem to last about one second for every 10 mph of speed limit. . With stock T brakes, I found myself slowing down for green lights ahead, fearing it would turn yellow before I got there.

For serious driving, front brakes are the answer.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Augustinovich on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 09:04 am:

Hi Erin, welcome to the Model T hobby, one of the finest hobby's if I say so myself. Sorry to hear your grandfather Wendell passed away, my condolences. I saw you on You Tube, mighty fine pickin'. You might try Model T Haven in Kansas for a project car. Take Care!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 02:21 pm:

Most insurance companies will write liability insurance for a Model T to handle the required liability to protect the other guy and his property if you hit him/it. Basic liability coverage for a Model T should be similar in expense to liability for anything else.

Some regular companies will also write comp and collision. My company wrote me a full, stated value, unlimited miles policy for my Model Ts. It costs me about double compared to a specialty company but I've got the coverage I want without the usage restrictions.

Your best bet for insurance is to talk to your agent face to face, explain what you want and make certain you understand any restrictions there may be on usage. If your agent only represents one company, seriously consider talking to an independent agent to see if there are better deals out there for coverage and/or price.

Remember, if you break the usage part of the insurance contract, they don't have to pay and you could be in a fight with them. I'd rather pay a little more up front than fight with lawyers over whether I was correct in my usage.

None of us ever want to use our insurance policies but I wouldn't want to suffer the consequences of not being adequately covered. The only folks who can afford to be uninsured are those who have nothing to begin with.

Walt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 03:28 pm:

Thanks Walt, that's what I was getting at.
Almost every one of you guys here have more "antique" car insurance experience than I do, this my first one. I'm a Hot Rodder, In the old days, I used the "antique" provision to avoid all that messy little stuff like having to make an old car have to comply with modern safety and pollution spes. (while I out ran most new cars on the street).
I'm sure most of the old "loop holes" I used are long gone by now.
My car is insured by Hagerty as a "Parade Vehicle" (500 miles a year, I think). Naturally in my ignorance and arrogance I concluded how are they going to know? I don't even know how far I've driven it! As Brent pointed out, they have "people" for that job.
Rick's, I was being the doom sayer here more than anything else in a (dramatic) effort to point out that it's real important to have your car insured for where it is and what you're doing if your involved in an accident, otherwise you could find your self uninsured. And yes, as Walt said, TALK to your insurance agent face to face, a pro will point out what you should really have and make a few bucks in the process, but that what it's all about anyway, right?
Accidents are called that because that's what they are. If we could predict them we could avoid em and then, if we didn't, we're talking "deliberates".


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration