Removing the engine.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Removing the engine.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeremy Locke on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 12:45 pm:

I am getting ready to remove the engine in the next few days. After doing my research, I have found that just one lifting point from spark plug #4 is all thats needed. Isn't that a lot of weight to have on just one point?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Drake on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 12:51 pm:

I thought sort of the same thing, but I've seen people do it with one or two plugs. I figure that a fully built out T motor has to be approaching 400lbs.

Instead, I bought some of those heavy duty tie down straps at the hardware store that are commonly used for tying things down to trailers. I hooked one across the front part of the motor, one zig-zagged around the hogs head and pan. Then both hooked onto the $24 two-ton hoist balancer I bought last year at the no-name tool store. whole setup worked very, very well, and probably will do that again when I put it back in. I know you're supposed to do it with two people, but I did it by myself using this simple approach.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 12:53 pm:

Jeremy, Wrong or right I've done it a dozen times or so times with no problems though I do use two spark holes when lifting a Model T engine/transmission with an aluminum head in place......Michael Pawelek


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:08 pm:

Lifting by a pipe thread scares me - and I'm fearless.

I made a loop with 3/4" strap steel between two rear head bolts. . On the flathead, it stayed there. . I made a longer one for the fronty, and have to remove it to make room for the valve cover. . I use studs, so the removal is easy.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeremy Locke on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:20 pm:

Scares me also. I know people do it, just scared to do it.. I need a safety backup. I like the picture in the service manual, with the engine clamp. I wonder how bad that crushes things.

Does anyone have pictures of their engine being pulled with the hoist?

What about when mounting the engine and transmission to a engine stand. Is mounting to the water inlet safe, and can handle all of the weight? Just wondering how safe it actually it is.
Just trying not to destroy my engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:34 pm:

I have picked up T engines for years using a short pice of chain hooked to two eye bolts into two 1/2"x1/4" pipe bushings. I guess I wouldn't feel as comfortable lifting by one hole. I do make sure no one has their feet under it and I get it onto the stand as soon as I can. Attached a couple of photos of the bracket I use. It bolts to the water inlet and hooks into two of the pan rail holes. I can't say if it will clear the starter. It bolts to a standard engine stand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:48 pm:

Jeremy

Just use common sense and caution. I have pulled and placed lots of T motors, with straps and with engine plate when head is off, and with good quality plug lifters with head bolted on finished engine and trans.

All methods work with care. I like the plug lift method best. Methods differ too if motor head is off or on.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 01:48 pm:

I remove the starter and install the plate I made like the above, before lifting the engine. I then lift the engine with a come-along (1 ton rating) tied to a rafter. Once the engine is up, I roll the car back, and roll the engine stand in. The engine is suspended in mid air only a couple of minutes.

Somebody makes an engine stand adapter, which I would buy if I had it to do over.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 02:45 pm:

I certainly would not lift from a plug hole if you have an aluminum head
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 04:43 pm:

One thing to rember is two eyebolts does not allways reduce the load on each leg by 50%.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 05:42 pm:

I use the front and rear head bolts with a chain in between. I use a bolt in the center and offset it to hold the engine at the proper tilt to get the pedals to clear the firewall. Has worked for me. When i worked in a garage when I was younger we pulled all the motors by the head bolts. I do get a longer grade 8 bolt so i can get all the threads with the chain bolted on. My brother built me a real nice engine holder for a generic engine stand its just a piece of angle with 4 bolts welded to it and ground to fit. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Watt on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:23 pm:

The MTFCA Engine Repair book shows you how to remove the engine without a hoist.
I have never done it this way or would I recommend it, as it seems very dangerous to both the mechanic and /or the engine if it ever got away on you.
I have done a few lifts using the third and fourth plug hole which works very well, but do agree that you make sure you keep yourself and helpers well clear so no one gets hurt if something goes wrong.
Has anyone ever weighed an engine c/w transmission?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:42 pm:

I do not know the exact weight of an engine and transmission but when our club does it's quick assembly show 4 guys lift a none starter engine and trans assembly with a lift bar and the fifth guy guides the engine with the starter crank. If you want to see it done click the link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmmbU3p5KnY

Steven


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sidney on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 07:47 pm:

Has anyone tried the one-man engine tumble, I seem to recall a ford book that shows how to flip the engine out onto the nose through the front of the frame, and install in the reverse...?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 08:00 pm:

Sidney
Yes I have done it when I was a younger man. This was back when I only had a dirt floor in the garage and no engine hoist. As you stand it on its nose you want to be really careful that it does not get away from you!! And yes I would remove all the "surplus" weight (starter, generator, hogs head, cylinder head) first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 09:26 pm:

I've used a short chain under 2 head bolts. Need longer head bolts for them if the head is still on the car. I've also used the eye in the rear spark plug hole. Both methods work. Whatever method you use, don't put body parts under the engine/transmission assembly. You only need to hoist it high enough to clear the front crossmember and then either move the car back or the hoist forward and immediately lower to the floor.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 09:42 pm:

It's generally safer to roll a car on 30" wheels than a portable hoist with tiny wheels or casters and a swinging engine.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 02:02 am:

If you are worried about lifting from spark plug holes, take 2 pieces of 3/8 angle iron and drill 2 holes that will span 2 head bolt holes in each one and use longer good grade bolts. Put a 3/8 to 1/2 inch hole in the upright portions and blt a 5/16 or 3/8 chain to it and have a grab hook on the other end of the chain to hook to your lifting device. Then it is adjustable. A T engine weighs about 375 pounds complete with transmission. Cummins uses two , 2 hole brackets with an eye hole in them and each is held on with 2 1/2 inc bolts that screw into the heads. Engine weight is about 3500 pounds and you can use the same setup with the transmission attached and that is more weight. I would not worry about lifting the T engine due to weight if you think ahead and use good materials. Spark plug lifts work great too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:28 am:

I remove the head with two crossing chains attached to four bolts into the corner headbolt holes. I run the chains thru a ring that I grap with the lift hook. Always worried about using a spark plug hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 04:24 pm:

When I was a whole lot younger, we took out engines and transmissions using a cedar post across the top, with a rope or chain around the whole mess, two of us would just pick it up and walk forward/backward with it. I know I saw such a method pictured in some old Ford manual, but that was a long time ago. I would be interested in what the assembly weighs, I was in better shape then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brett Larson on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 05:22 pm:

Grady, a friend and I just removed the engine from my racer in the same manner that you described. I took two 1 ft. sections of 5/16" chain and attached each section to two headbolts. I took a 4x4 landscaping timer ($3) I stripped the engine down (took of the head, hogshead, pistons, and left the pan in the car). I also had the body off as well to make things easier. Worked great and it was cheap. With two people, the engine wasn't too heavy.

However, when I put the engine back in the car, I plan on putting the pan on the engine 1st to get the 4th main lined up, so I may need a little more muscle to get it back in!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 06:22 pm:

Mr. Larson, we had the fenders and all off, so it was pretty easy. I am trying hard to remember if we stood the engine up to align the crank, just can't remember if we even thought about it. We left everything on if I remember right, but that is why I have back problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 08:01 pm:

I have the slid the motor out onto it's nose and turned and semi sat/droped it down. Put it back in the same way. Just make sure everything that can be taken off is! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 08:17 pm:

Mark, You must be a stronger man than I. There is an article in the Engine booklet about how to do that, but it would be very easy to drop on the toe, or get a hernia or a ruptured disk that way.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 08:26 pm:

Last time I pulled my engine, I put some strips of plastic under the mounts, slid it out with the crank handle as far as possible, I then installed the adapter plate then slid the stand on, then flipped it upright onto the floor. I would have taken pics guys, but hard to do all that with no help. Desperate times call for desperate measures. Just be carefull, and good luck, Keith B


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:41 pm:

Strong not! Thin as a rail, 52 1/2y's, 5 10 and 145 lbs wet. Arrrr! You gota do what you gota do! :-)


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