Model T on ice

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Model T on ice
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 03:20 pm:

Toon Boer, one of the Dutch T owners who posts on this forum, just sent me these two pictures and asked me to resize and post them here.

As you may know, it has been unseasonably cold in Europe this winter. I read the Dutch paper on line every morning, and have noticed in the last few weeks that the canals and lakes have been declared safe for skating.

These are pictures of Klaas and Margreet Hopman from Purmerend on the IJsselmeer (the former Zuiderzee) taken today.

ijs1

ijs2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 04:36 pm:

Looks WAY too cold for me!
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 05:12 pm:

Yeah, Bob, but look at the number of people skating beyond the T. It's really a typically Dutch scene. Even here in St. Louis, a member of the Dutch community lives on a lake. In 2007, after a spell of cold weather, he measured the thickness of the ice and when it was thick enough to skate on, he put out the word and a bunch of people went to his house on a Sunday afternoon.
(Please note that I stayed on the shore and took pictures.... :-) )

schaatsen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 06:13 pm:

Dick

That just reminds me of the time, when I was much, much younger, we had an extended cold period and the slew between the Meremac and Mississippi river froze over. We skated on it for several days and then it snowed. Dad figure it was cold so long that he took the Ford 8n with a road scraper and moved the snow off of the ice so we could skate. On his very last pass the ice broke and the tractor went in. We spent the rest of the evening and part of the night chopping ice and pulling the tractor out. The tractor and my Dad survived the mishap, but no more vehicles on ice.

Steven


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 06:44 pm:

That is a huge lake Dick. I don't blame you for staying on dry land. Steven, that is a great story...can't believe y'all got the tractor out.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 06:50 pm:

The body of water the T and the skaters are on is called the IJsselmeer. For centuries, it was a sea arm called the Zuiderzee (South Sea). Then in the late '20's and early '30's, a dike 20 miles long was built to close it off from the sea and turn it into a fresh-water lake. After that was done, much land was reclaimed from the water. The Dutch say, "God created the earth, but the Dutch created Holland."

The dike is called the Aflsuitdijk (Closure Dike) and it was closed in May of 1932, as I recall. (North Sea on the left, IJsselmeer on the right.)

afsluitdijk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:11 pm:

Steven, how deep did the tractor go? If you could get it out without drowning or freezing to death, I assume that some of it was above the surface. Still sounds cold, though.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:16 pm:

Aint no dang ice thick enough for me to want to risk looseing my T and my a-- driveing accross it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:57 pm:

You guys obviously haven't studied the "Ice Road Truckers" of Northern Canada. They drive anything and everything across the frozen lakes.
Check this out: http://www.kingofobsolete.ca/
My kinda guy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 11:00 pm:

Fred, the History Channel (I think) has a series on the Ice Road Truckers. Scary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 11:25 pm:

Dick
I've heard of that series, but since I don't watch TV, I haven't seen it. My link above is of Joey Barnes. He's an interesting fellow - lives a life out of the past. I often wondered if I'd ended up doing something like that if my wife hadn't hooked me in 1966.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 10:36 am:

Dick

The top of the hood and the top of the rear wheels were above the surface. It was a good thing the slew was not deep.

Steven


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 11:43 am:

I knew a old Canadian gentleman who made a fortune by buying an Alaskan gold mind that was inaccessible because of no road. He hauled the gold out in winter by trucking over the frozen river.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Erfert, Flagstaff, AZ. on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 02:50 pm:

Lake Winnebago in Wisconsin has many stories to tell about ice fisherman pulling the shanties out on the ice with T's and A's and when it started to thaw they would try to haul them back off before it got to thin. Many of them went in because they waited to long. They used T's and A's because they were easy to replace and cost almost nothing in the 40's and 50's. That was normal for lot's of lakes.
Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James H. Daw on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 02:50 pm:

I have looked at a video of a railroad across a some body of water in Russia. The Germans thought they had all supply routes closed to Russia. I forget how thick the ice wasb but they also ran bulldozers and trucks across it. When the ice started melting it showed water over two feet deep on top of the ice and they were still driving trucks on it.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim ( ModelTengine.com ) on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 06:24 pm:

Here's an article I wrote right after I got my Fordor. www.modeltengine.com/bayfrozeover.htm

Here's a map showing the path they took:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 07:26 pm:

Yeh, I see blizzards in Mid-West on the Wx channel.

It's tough here, too; I had to get my cutoff pants out of winter storage. . 88 in our back yard yesterday, and 91 today.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 07:29 pm:

Thanks Rick...I just came in from plowing snow all day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 07:31 pm:

Sorry I mean Ralph


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brent Kleinsteuber on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 07:55 pm:

My grandfather has told stories of when he was a teenager going out onto Lake Ontario with his brother and the farm truck to cut out ice. The ice was sold for the village folks ice boxes. Once they travelled out onto Consecon Lake and the truck and all just about went in. Somewhere I have a photo of them out on Lake Ontario. If I find it before the thaw I will upload it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 08:01 pm:

Very neat, thank you for sharing!


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