CRITICAL NATURE OF OUTSIDE OIL LINE?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: CRITICAL NATURE OF OUTSIDE OIL LINE?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Edward R. Levy on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 01:25 pm:

I recently had a major rebuild done on my 1916 Touring car. The engine did not have the outside oil line that runs from the mag post. In going through my stash of never opened parts I have found an outside oil line kit. My question is does this really help that much? Is it worth the effort to instal? How much oil really ends up running down the outside line. Bottum line, if it was your car what choice would you make? Please feel free to offer your advice.
Edward R. Levy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 01:30 pm:

Ed

Why not use it. If the inside line plugs up, they can and have you at least still have oil to the front of the engine. IMO use it, I even go further and put 2 additional inside oil lines, wont hurt any thing.

Mike Bender
Tulsa OK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 01:58 pm:

It's not necessary if your inside oiler is in good condition, however, if band lint or any dirt or sludge clogs the inside oil line, you will have a quick meltdown. The outside oiler (there are many types) just gives you an extra source of oil and can save a costly engine repair. I had one car that the inside funnel broke off when it was hit by the magnets. I didn't know why my magneto stopped working shortly after installing the engine. I drove it for 10 years with just the oil going in the inside line without the funnel and the outside oiler. I pulled it later to install a new magneto and found out what had happened. All I did to the engine was to remove some shims and install the new magneto. It runs just fine. I don't know for sure if the outside oiler is what saved it, but I'm glad it had one.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 02:03 pm:

Tim at GenIII built me a brand new modified (no mag) engine recently (which runs beautifully). He recently went to the trouble to fabricate an outside oiler kit for it, shipped it to me and said install it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 02:19 pm:

An outside oil line is sorta like buying an insurance policy or getting a flu shot. You hope you never need either one, but they do give peace of mind. IMO, you milage may vary. JP


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 05:01 pm:

So I guess two oil lines would be like wearing a belt and suspenders?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 05:59 pm:

I have a '13 runabout that had no outside oil line. I had been using, and shredding, kevlar band linings. (No, I'm not trying to restart that war.) Just before the 2007 Colorado tour, I switched to wood linings. For a couple of hundred miles I was still fishing kevlar debris out of my oil screen every 50 miles or so, but eventually the oil ran clean. EIGHT MILES (!!) into the Colorado tour, the number one rod bearing cratered. When I subsequently had the engine torn down, the inside oil line was totally plugged with kevlar lint that the oil screen hadn't picked up. I now have the big Fun Products outside oil line, I still use wood (and yes, it chatters, regardless of what goop additives I put in the oil), and my oil screen is always clean. But I'll never forget 6,000 miles of trailering for 8 miles of touring. Neither will my wife.

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 06:23 pm:

A good check is to pull a forward pan cover bolt. If there's little or no oil dripping out at idle, do something..

Some of those mag plug oilers don't catch any oil unless you put in a scoop.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 06:31 pm:

Being part purist and part what ever they did back in the day i did not rush out and install The DR Terry H Mud Vein Scoop oiler. After joining the two pice crankshaft club my engine builder installed it on the new rebuild.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 08:23 pm:

Had a mag post oiler on my 27 when I bought it, put a piece of clear tubing to see the flow, no flow whatso ever. it will go back with a scoop type. just my 02. Keith B


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 12:58 am:

Based on the oil dumped on my driveway when I drove off with the front connection not bolted up, the external oil line sure moves some oil forward!
Recommend installing it if you have one on hand.
Cheers
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By EDWARD R LEVY on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 01:11 am:

Mike,
Thanks for the tip. How do you mount the additional inside oil lines. A sketch would help if possible
Edward R. Levy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By warren rollins on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 11:07 am:

Edward, I got my inside oilers from Wally Szumoloski. modeltnews@aol.com, phone 773-586-4485. These oil lines are a copy of an original after market accessory. You remove the oil pan inspection plate and slide them in . They are held in place by the inspection pan horseshoes.
Walley makes them for both sides and the oil flow comes from a lower level than the standard line. Do they work? yes they do. they saved my engine on a mountain tour when I forgot to close the upper petcock. I had about a little over a quart of oil when I discovered the problem. I run one in both of my Ts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 12:19 pm:

Gilbert
I may be interested in the outside oil line you mentioned from Fun Projects, but I do not see it listed on John Reagan's website
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dirtfloor mechanic on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 12:56 am:

I recently installed a mag post oiler from fun projects on a friend's T. With the front pipe disconnected and at idle it filled a pint milk bottle in about a minute.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 01:20 am:

I have a sight glass installed in all of my mag post outside oil lines and I am glad to see that there is a large amount of oil flowing through them. Outside oil lines are easy to install and I would not leave home without one. That being said I can see why dirtfloor mechanics do not understand how oil can make a 90 degree turn and flow to the front of the engine. Try this.... Take the mag post off and start the car. My bet is that you will find out how much oil is thrown off the magnets and flywheel.

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By aaron griffey on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 01:26 am:

If you use copper tubing for the outside oil line you MUST have at least 4 inches of fuel or oil hose on each end of the copper.
If you don't... the copper will break on one end eventually.
I was driving a '23 4 door (fodor) for a short road test. When I got back to the shop to open the door the outside oil line was pumping oil out fast. It broke on the front end. I had about a quart left.
The car was going and did go on a 100 mile tour the next day.
If it wasn't for the road test the line would have broken the next morning on the freeway on the way to San Jose. Never would have made it.


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