1906 color picture -- Great Screen saver of Model N #1 at Piquette Plant

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: 1906 color picture -- Great Screen saver of Model N #1 at Piquette Plant
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 02:12 am:

I stumbled across the picture below at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fordmotorcompany/2680401102/sizes/m/ called Flickr photo page. And I think it is courtesy of the Ford Motor Company. But if you go to that link and click on “Down load Original” for size – you can Zoom in and see many additional details. If someone could let me know how we ae to really post the credit for the photo, please let me know.



But I would still like to know how did the photo get to be in color? I checked and they did have color photography available by then. But I’ve seen several black and white photos like that but not the color photo before. I wonder if they originally took the photo in color or if someone "photo shopped it?"

Warm Regards,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 02:32 am:

Could well be hand cloured. An artist (or the photographer) painted the B&W photo with special paints. Hand coloured pictures were popular in NZ at teh turn of last century and good artists can do an amazingly realistic job.
Cheers
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 04:10 am:

Here is a hand coloured photo of the Kuranui gold mine, Thames, New Zealand:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 04:16 am:

And the Mangapehi saw mill around 1910.
Cheers
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ivan Warrington on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 08:57 am:

Hmm, I think the picture is the Ford building in Marshaltown, Iowa.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 10:44 am:

Hap, This looks like an original color photo, it's fairly sharp, whereas the postcards are a little fuzzy, so probably hand tinted. Color photography was developed around 1900, very expensive, tedious to process & the chemicals used very dangerous. Pathe did color movies, in which each frame had to be hand tinted.

Alex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 11:12 am:

I don't know about that photo. There is something funny about it. I think its new. the concrete window ledges, steps, etc. look weathered,there's something funny about the bricks along the front of the building where maybe some modern shrubs would have been. Wouldn't a large factory of the day have lots of large overhead power lines? No license plates on the car, and I'm not sure but that plaque by the entry looks about the right size to be a "Historical Register" marker. The street and the turf look very suspicious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 11:16 am:

Did you see the 5 people in the picture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 11:49 am:

This is a link to stories about the Piquette plant, along with original and recent photos.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://oz.plymouth.edu/~trentb/ModelT/Homecoming/piquet1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://oz.plymouth.edu/~trentb/ModelT/Homecoming/Homecoming.html&usg=__ZzpVqfl8a_GYRhBC2q_sCojV-C0=&h=521&w=520&sz=28&hl=en&start=5&tbnid=Ll3uHHFYZgTWHM:&tbnh=131&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dsite:oz.plymouth.edu%2Bclara%2Bford%2Bdriving%2Bmodel%2Bn%2Bford%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den

This is the black and white photo, along with another photo, probably of the same car, with Henry Ford in the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:11 pm:

Here is the car and the two women driving it. From the original.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:13 pm:

Pretty amazing detail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:15 pm:

If Henry sees this guy leaning on the window instead of working he'll be looking for a job!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:18 pm:

Or this one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:20 pm:

Great Photo. With the colorization, it just seemed to perfect. Thanks Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:22 pm:

Good looking women driving, maybe that's why they were looking out the window.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:31 pm:

No way, Stan. It had to be the car!! As we all know, cars are more interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard G Goelz on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 01:56 pm:

Leave it to Stan to zoom in on the women.!!
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 02:57 pm:

Purely academic, Richard. I found it interesting that in that time they showed two women in the car. Could this be the beginning of women's lib???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 03:10 pm:

You can buy this image as a large colour poster from the Piquette Ave shop. I cant remember the price but I do remember it as good value.
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 03:21 pm:

I don't think the car was moving given the movement on the ladies face on the left (slow film in those days). Probably taken with a large format camera to keep the the building in perspective.Looks to be hand tinted, all studios had a colorist in house even up until the 50's and 60's when color film was available. A "hand tinted" print is pretty pricey these days if you can find some one to do it. I copied a photograph for a man about 25 years ago that was the most beautiful hand tinted portrait I have ever seen. It was of his wife done during WWII, she was a model in NYC for war posters. It looked to be in color but was hand done.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 03:30 pm:

One of the women is Clara Ford. She apparently prefered to board and alight from the left hand side of a car and hence influenced Henry to make the T a lefty.

That is Henry leaning out of his office window.
Behind him, the blank bit of wall, without any windows, is the wall of the company vault. It was also in Henrys office.

The colour image is the exact same image as the black and white.
In my honest, humble and professional opinion, its been completely digitised in order to make a few bucks for the great people at Piquette Ave.

Rob.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Mullin on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 03:42 pm:

Hap, Stan and all:

That is a great version of the B&W photo of Clara Ford driving the Ford Model N east on Piquette Avenue. The person in the near corner window better be Henry Ford, since that is his office. The large prints are $20.00 plus postage and packaging.

The color (colour?) is so good, it is hard to believe it was hand colored. Could this be the same software Ted Turner used to colorize movies?

Anyone who has a chnace this summer should plan to come by. The Model T classes by Don and David Liepelt alone are worth thr trip.

Tom
Piquette Ts
Detroit


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne in Malvern, PA on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 04:55 pm:

Trent spent some time on this picture during one of his excellent seminars at the Indiana Centennial. As I recall, the picture was staged as a publicity shot with Clara driving and Henry looking out the window. Piquette was quite a ways out of central Detroit at that point in time, hence the lack of powerlines and other clutter you normally see in these kinds of photos. Very well done colorizing if its not an original - its now my desktop photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 05:26 pm:

Here's another one, obviously taken on the same day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 01:04 am:

If you look at stereo cards of that period you find three common types: Black & white photographic prints, which produced the best stereoscopic effect; hand colored b&w prints, second best; and lithographed colored prints which were often good looking pictures but poor stereo. As Bob pointed out, hand coloring of b&w photos persisted past mid century. I have some hand colored portraits of my little brother and me from the forties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 02:47 am:

In 1971 I started work with a photographic studio in country NSW. The owner was an old school British photographer and he taught me a great deal about photography including hand colouring. We used a local older lady who did the actual colouring, but all of the pre-bleaching was, eventually, all done by me......and by hand. Everything that wasnt black had to be bleached. Some of it was pretty tricky, eg; around black ties and coloured shirts. Anyway after a few years of this I ran away to sea and gained some real photographic training and qualifications in the Navy.
However, my earlier years with this old guy gave me a versatility that a lot of others in my trade didnt have.
Rob.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 04:02 am:

Rob,
I don't understand the bleaching process you did. In my experience we processed double weight fiber base paper and toned it either sepia or selenium depending on the final effect desired. Sepia was most desirable for coloring. The sepia toning improved the life of the print due to washing the print enough in order to remove the chemicals which would spot the finished print.That is why most have lasted so long.The process is sulfur based and smells like rotten eggs. Chemical break down in the emulsion have destroyed more old photographs than anything. Five years ago I could have hand printed anything you wanted in my darkroom. Today Kodak does not produce a silver paper, I now print on their Ink Jet papers.Kinda sad for an old school guy. There are great papers and inks but nothing will ever compare to silver.
Feel kinda old,
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 04:40 am:

Hi Bob,
Isnt the 1st stage of sepia toning to bleach the image then immerse it into the toner? In order to achieve the best blacks possible, they were left black and not bleached, therefore the toner wouldnt have any effect on them.
Yes all those good things you could do with a fibre base paper were pretty well ruined when resin coated paper appeared. It was about then that my career started to slow. Its been many years since I operated a darkroom. I think a purist can still purchase, at great expense, fibre based silver paper.
I loved the coolness of Selinium tones too.
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 08:53 am:

My maternal Grandmother did hand tinting, did a pretty good job of it, had no formal training, this was in the 1800's. I have a very few pictures she did, one is of my maternal Great Grandmother. My Grandmother would color the loops and whorls on penny post cards and the addresses on envelopes, always a treat to get something from her as it was so pretty. Like everything else, did not attach enough importance to it at the time and most of it is gone, like T Models.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Sunday, January 18, 2009 - 02:52 pm:

Rob,
You are correct on bleaching the print first. I have never spot bleached a print though...sounds interesting. Resin based papers will tone but not nearly as nice as fiber based papers. I remember when you could go to a photo shop and buy from a great variety of papers...those days are gone with the exception of some of the larger stores in big cities....no more Kodak though. I think Ilford and some others still manufacture them. When I think back, I have spent untold hours in the darkroom making thousands of prints over the years...kinda miss it. There was a time when I could set the water temp for processing Ektachrome by running the water over my hand. Boy, I am OLD,
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 06:01 pm:

Did you notice the other car in the photo sitting alongside the building? IMO, if it is a Ford, it would have to be a Model K based on the rear fender shape, the rear spring arrangement (elliptic) and the overall size of the vehicle.

Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Martin, Sydney, Australia. on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 06:16 pm:

Dan,
I don't think it's a "K", It has a centre chain drive diff.

Peter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 06:23 pm:

It's an F


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ken parker on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 09:16 am:

Horn is on right side of steering column in picture with the ladies, left side with Henry Ford. There are a couple of other slight differences that would seem to indicate two different cars if taken on same day. Really neat pictures.
KP


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 11:04 am:

Ken, It looks like the horn has simply been swung over from right to left. Maybe, Mrs. Ford and Mr. Wills were not of the same "hand", i.e. right handed vs. left handed.

I believe the car is the protoype Model N which, I also believe, still exists but, I do not know the whereabouts of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Mullin on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 12:47 pm:

Here is the Piquette Plant showing the southeast corner of the building.

piquette

The power lines are still alongside on the Beaubien frontage.

Tom


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