Anderson Timer on RHD

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Anderson Timer on RHD
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Wotherspoon on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 05:16 pm:

I've always been a Tiger Timer man, but have recently purchased a Anderson Timer for my 1924. Are there any tips or tricks that I need to be aware of when installing. I'm also looking for ones that may relate to right hand drive applications.

Thanks,
James.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 07:41 pm:

An important point to remember with RHD cars is the timer is mounted upside down and therefore the control rod actuates from underneath. This means that timers made for the U.S market have the oiler facing down and the terminal numbers are in a different position. Ignore the terminal numbers and just connect the wires in the same order and position as they were for the previous timer.
With the Anderson timer, the length of the control rod has to be adjusted; it is not the same as for the roller timer. I had to shorten the rod (i.e. bend it closer).timer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 08:37 pm:

John H
I am confused.
Do I understand from your post that there are unique timers used for RHD cars? Or where LHD car timers used with the oiler pointed down? If so how were the RHD timer oiled?
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 09:20 pm:

Ron - JohnH kinda' lost me on this one too, but what I think he is saying is that because on a RHD vehicle, the spark advance rod pulls/pushes from the opposite side, and accordingly, the timer is installed 180 deg. from the normal position so as to maintain proper operation of the spark advance lever. I think,.....maybe,.....whatever,........harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 09:34 pm:

Yes. Nice thing about the Anderson, no oil hole to worry about.
MarkG and Nellybell
Or find a timer made for right hand drive cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Wotherspoon on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 12:14 am:

Thanks John, I had a feeling that there was a modification to be made to the timer control rod. Do you know approximately how much of a bend you had to put in the rod?

The car has run with a distributor for the past 25 years and we are only now putting her back on coils. Hence there is a completely different set up in place now. I'll need to go through my supplies to see if I have a timer control rod suitable for the job in the garage.

Cheers,
James.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 12:23 am:

I believe I have a NOS Tiger Timer in the box for a RHD somewhere here. It has the spark lead eye on the bottom with the flip-up oiler positioned at the top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 12:24 am:

My 2c - the Anderson works well in RHD, as JohnH says, mount it upside down (turned 180 degrees) and the spark advance rod runs from the bottom of the timer. How long should it be? set the timer fully retarded, set the spark lever (left hand lever) fully retarded and then measure the distance needed. A few kinks here and there to adjust.

Cheers
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 01:43 am:

Ron- In answer to your question, timers made for the Canadian RHD export market had the oiler fitted on the opposite side of the timer casing so they could be oiled from the top as the control arm is actuated at the bottom. I have just checked my original timer stock and they are all opposite to my new anderson and tiger timers as they were made in USA. The opposite oiler location even applied to the rare combined timer/oil filler from the 1912 year which I have seen a sample of.
James,you will be most pleased with the anderson timer and oiling isnt an issue!Be careful to make sure you have the timing exactly right before trying to restart the car. You may require a little rod bending to get it right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Wotherspoon on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 02:54 am:

Adrian, thanks for the info, it will come in handy.

Warwick, we're getting mums car back on the road after a long absence. We're changing it back to coils and ditching the distributor, we've never been really happy with it. The poor old girl has been sitting in the garage idle too long. It hasn't been on the road since it broke down on the Bay to Birdwood tour back in 2002.

Cheers,
James.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Simon Bayley on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 06:23 am:

Hi all,

I have a 1923 Canadian Tourer and it has an original ford roller timer on it and it has two oilers... top and bottom.. so maybe they created a version to be used for both LHD and RHD.

Cheers Simon

Adrian - not long now till the rally...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 07:13 pm:

Ron - as Warwick says, the Canadian RHD timers are different to their U.S counterparts. Obviously they can be used but getting to the oiler isn't as convenient...but most cars leak enough oil into there anyway, and it's a non issue for Andersons anyway.
James - the rod doesn't have to be bent a huge amount, I think from memory maybe it was about an inch shorter. Certainly no need to shorten or modify it. The best way to do this is to set the timer up with the rod disconnected, then bend the rod so it fits straight in without moving the timer or timing lever.
I might post a pic of my original timer later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Wednesday, January 21, 2009 - 04:19 am:

rhd timers


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration