Question on washing soda electrolysis rust removal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Question on washing soda electrolysis rust removal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 04:03 am:

How strong of an amperage current do you need from a charger? I have a 12 volt 6 amp charger but have never used it this way but would like to get more information befor I jump off the deep end. The one thread posted on it said he used a 200 amp charger. What have people tried that worked?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 08:35 am:

When I did it last time I used my 6 amp 12 volt Schmacher charger.It did fine.just dont let your clamps get in the mixture.
I mixed powders till I got about a 4 amp draw and left it.that way I werent running the charger wide open for a long time.
I would buy a second charger for this so you will have 1 to use for it's purpose and 1 for the cleaning.The reason I say that is I first tryed a cheapy charger from Harbor freight.It wound up with something burnt up in it.I aint took it apart to see what it was yet.couldnt be but 2 or 3 different things and depending on which it was as to rather it is worth patching.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Martin on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 11:25 am:

A 6 amp charger will work fine.
1 cup of bicarb per 2-3 gallons will be enough.
the more surface area you have at the connection to the part the better. The removal is "line of sight" from anode to cathode, so this won't work around corners or in a deep hole unless you put a seprate cathode in those places. I use a 5 gallon plastic pail for small parts, and an empty metal gallon can cut open and placed on the inside of the bucket, add water and soda, hang the part from the top of the bucket, make sure that the part does not touch the scrap metal bucket, if thers are places it touches and you can not avoid it, use some duct take to insulate. After it has been "cooking" for a while it will develop a black oxidation on the part, you will need to clean this off with a wire brush, it will insulate the part from the current. Large gutter nails work good for cylinder bores and large holes. I have some 1" dia. carbon electrodes that work great for bores and small parts, let me know if you are interested in a couple of them. Be careful if you use any stainless steel in the tank. I generates Hexavalent crome which is a cancer causing material. If you have the time the electrolysis works great and will save your parts from the risk of damage from force or heat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thunder on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 11:47 am:

A bunch of us on Oldgas have tried this. I for one have had good results in my limited applications of this process. Check out these links, for additional info.
http://www.antique-engines.com/electrol.asp
and
http://www.oldgas.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=127321&page=1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Seager on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 12:31 pm:

Dennis, The bigger the charger the better it will work faster. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 01:56 pm:

I use a 36 volt, 25 amp golf cart battery charger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jkcallin on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 06:25 pm:

If you have difficulty finding the wash soda, PH+, a swimming pool product is the same, sodium carbonate. Wally World usually has it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 07:22 pm:

A further note the charger must not have polarity protection,
or at least have a switch (not a push button) to over ride it.
Most small tools etc will draw 3 to 5 amps from a 12V DC
power supply with the correct washing soda electrolyte mix.
Process can be left running for days without ill affects.
Art

Real "Rust Bucket"
Before and After


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, January 24, 2009 - 08:21 pm:

A little salt in the water sure makes it work better. I put about two cups of salt in my 100 gallon tank. Incidentally, with the thawing and freezing weather we've been having my tank burst along the bottom when it froze. New tank this spring. I use a stock tank, kind of a rubbery fiberglass. Tough and about fifty bucks at the farm store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 01:54 pm:

I posted a lot of info some time back on this when I was cleaning my Cushman binder engine. It worked remarkably well with that engine that had gotten water in it and was stuck bad.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/59798.html?1216250945


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Victor in Australia on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 05:03 am:

Professionally , the current recommendation is for 100 amps per square foot of job at no more than 4 volts . This effects quick clean removal of rust and scale , easily controlled . Higher voltage runs the risk of foaming and excessive metal removal ,but of course lower amperage slows the process and THEN higher voltage helps, but must be monitored closely and not left to its own devices.( for long periods.)


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