Colorado engine

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Colorado engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Larkins on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 03:51 pm:

I thought maybe some of you could help me with a couple of questions. My brother brought this old carcass back from Greeley over Christmas thinking it might be salvageable (it was going to be sold for iron). It has been used as a target sometime in the past. The block looks pretty good except for the bullet holes. Any ideas how to fix these?
The other question has to do with the serial #s. This is a 1928 engine according to the original sn (1514185?) but has been renumbered to the one in the picture S12037COLO. Can anyone shed any light on why they might have done this? It came with a truck chassis that had a homemade fifth wheel setup. I do not know if the engine and chassis go together.
Ken Larkins


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 04:00 pm:

Its a boat anchor. Unless it was a really early or rare block, its not worth the effort. Theres plenty of blocks still around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 05:34 pm:

Can you post a photo of the chassis and 5th wheel?I would be interested to see how it is made up.
Also,are those the only 2 bullet holes? what is the condition of the rest of the engine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Brown on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 05:40 pm:

I wouldn't boat anchor it...its a part of T history! One day even a late blcok will be hard to get hold of. As well as its an unusual serial number...whats a nice restored model T now was just rubbish 40 years ago! Who knows....in another 40 years blocks might sell for what a 1912 does now?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Larkins on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 06:07 pm:

I have rebuilt many old one cylinder engines that were in much worse shape than this one so it will be resurrected and put back into living history. I like a challenge.
Here is the frame. Kinda crude but from the looks of the axle wear it hauled some good sized loads.
Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 06:16 pm:

That looks like it coud be a pretty darn good frame and rear end. Rear crossmember looks like it still has some original paint on it, and no evidence of any cracks, welds or other repairs. Might be a pretty good rear end too,.....(???)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 06:17 pm:

If you have the hubs the spokes can be had now for those wheels.I have a new set in the box waiting for me to get off my --- to install them.

That appears to be a good chassis.Keep us posted on the repairs.That 1 water jacket hole appears to be a simple fix.The cylinder 1,that may require a sleeve in that cylinder for a decent repair.
These things are common now.But it wont be to long that we will wish this stuff werent tossed.
A Challenge,That to me is a good mind set for this hobby.A trait so often lost in younger folkes today to.
Go for it and make it happen.

I fix alot of things for that simple reason.There was no words to discribe how I felt when I drove my TT truck past the folks that said I would never get it rolling,much less running.They ate thier crow over rice.With Gravy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Larkins on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 06:28 pm:

Thanks for your take on it. The hole is down pretty low. Is welding it out of the question? The frame looks to be a good rebuildable one. The rear end still has the u joint in it and seems to turn ok. At some point I will rebuild it and rewood the wheels.
Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gordon Byers on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 06:32 pm:

Re: the S12037COLO number, evidently at some point in time the original title was lost or destroyed, or the vehicle the engine was in was junked and then brought back to life at which time a new Colorado title was applied for and this number was issued by the state to replace the original engine and frame number. My '27 had been relegated to the junkyard, when I drug it out I had to go through this process so my Colorado title has a similar number.
Gordon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thunder on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 07:36 pm:

I'm certainly, no expert on what may be needed to repair that block, but if it were mine, I think I would drill it, thread it, then install a bolt with some JB Weld. The proper way to repair it though, would dictate heating it till its red hot, welding it when hot, cooling it properly, then align boring it back to specs.

I say, go with the JB Weld, and see if it works...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 08:07 pm:

Ken,
How about drilling & tapping for a cast iron pipe plug? Put it in with water so it will rust and "grow" in place. I think the general concensous is that JB Weld would work buy you may have to replace it in a few years, just don't use the "Quick" JB. It don't seem to hold up as well.

The other option might be to weld it with cast iron rod & oxy/acet torch. (Old Model T piston rings work for the cast iron rod.) I think if you search on the Forum you can find a thread that details doing this. I've done some of this and it is a lot easier than you would think.
Verne Shirk
Wichita, KS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 08:43 pm:

A threaded cast iron plug is the way to go. You don't have any cracks to spread so I don't see a downside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Larkins on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 11:13 pm:

I hadn't thought about plugging it. Thanks so much for all your help and advice. This forum is such a great resource.
Ken Larkins


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 12:09 am:

"Re: the S12037COLO number, evidently at some point in time the original title was lost or destroyed, or the vehicle the engine was in was junked and then brought back to life at which time a new Colorado title was applied for and this number was issued by the state to replace the original engine and frame number. My '27 had been relegated to the junkyard, when I drug it out I had to go through this process so my Colorado title has a similar number.
Gordon"

This is a common practice in many states for title-less old cars. It can get quite complicated and expensive.
You must submit a "Statement of Construction" and Notarized bills of sale for EVERYTHING old involved, plus reciepts for any aftermarket (new) parts.
Also, since this is in effect a "new" car, you may also have to comply with some modern safety and emmission regs, (PCV valve, seat belts, etc.) I imagine it's probably a little more forgiving with a Model T than it is with 40's & 50's cars.
If you can find any (semi) legal way to avoid taking this route, do it.
(ask me how I know)
In this modern Internet age it's a lot easier to trace a frame/engine #'s back through the years. It's not like it was 30+ years ago, the last time I did it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gordon Byers on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 01:33 am:

Dennis, that is true to an extent in Colorado, I had to furnish pictures of the various stages of restoration but it is titled as a '27 and there is no restrictions as far as the modern safety or emission regs. Also, I didn't have to furnish any notarized documentation or receipts. However I did all of this in 1987 so I'm sure that the rules might have changed in the interim. I agree that it would be best to avoid this if possible.
Gordon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gordon Byers on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 01:35 am:

Whoops, senior moment and too late in the evening. It was 1967 that I did all of that.
Gordon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Larkins on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 12:17 pm:

According to the serial # on this engine it was made in Sept. 1928. Is this a replacement engine or were TT trucks still being made in 1928?
Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 01:03 pm:

It varies from state to state and like I mentioned, I'm sure they are more forgiving with something like a T than say a 40's car.
When I bought My 27 Tudor here in Florida a few years back, it had a valid title but the title said "1928 Ford"? That's a Model A!
I did my homework, my car was made (according to the engine and matching frame #) in Feb 27. I also traced the the numbers back to when the car was in Georgia and it was titled as a 27, FLORIDA SCREWED UP!
Trying to get them to correct THEIR "typo" turned out to be interesting to say the least.
I'd probably still me screwing around with it but I got lucky. It turns out that my car was at one time owned by the father of the director of the Sarasota County DMV!
Once they found that out, THEY made an appointment with ME to correct everything.
It's just been my experience over the years that the clueless bureaucrats at the DMV are not in any hurry to go out of their way when it comes to anything unusual.


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration