Is ther any history of synthetic oil use in model t's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2008: Is ther any history of synthetic oil use in model t's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Healey on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 02:17 pm:

I would like to know if anyone is using synthetic oil in model T Fords.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Von Nordheim on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 02:35 pm:

John,
I have been using synthetic oil in our 13 T touring for approx. 8 yrs. I happen to like it.....others think I am wasting my money. I also use synthetic gear oil in the rear end.
Have not needed to remove any shims since I rebuilt the engine 8 yrs. ago.
Yes, it is more expensive than conventional oils.....however, it's my choice. Others will tell you using synthetic in a model T is like throwing money out the window....to each his own.
Les


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 03:22 pm:

I don't use it in the engine, because it's tougher to clean off the driveway. I like it for the diffy, because it doesn't of sulfur stink like the conventional oils.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Von Nordheim on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 03:57 pm:

I have read that synthetic oil has better penetrating qualities compaired to most conventional oils. The good side is it may provide better lubercation for the splash oiling system which a T has. The down side is.....your existing oil leaks will not get better. I run a modern front shaft seal for both the crankshaft and cam. Also, run a sealed 4th main bearing. Most of my oil leaks are around the peddel shafts and clutch release shaft. The peddel shafts still leak even with O-rings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 03:57 pm:

I use Mobil 1 in my modern car and pick up and dump truck. I have used Mobil 1 since 1995. I use Mobil Delvac 1 (synthetic for diesel), in my tractor, skid-loader,and lawn mower. When I bought my TT two years ago. The oil jobber in my area suggested It might soften neoprene seals in the model t. I believe him because he had nothing to gain financially by telling me this. I really like the synthetic oil, especially in the cold weather.the engine turns over easier and I don't feel as bad if I run run over a little on my oil change. My old pick-up has 212000 (approx) miles on it and I have never had to add oil between changes. The price is ridiculously high but I think it costs so much a mile to drive whether you spend it on lube or repairs after the fact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Byrne on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 03:57 pm:

I've been using Mobil 1 in my 1914 for over 15 years now. I know it is overkill for the engine's needs as far as proper lubrication is concerned, but I like it a lot better when it comes to hand cranking in cold weather. I general drive my 14 less than a 1000 miles a year so one oil change a year isn't too much for the improved winter performance. In other years with higher mileage, I've used regular 10-30 during the summer and then put Mobil 1 back in for the fall/winter months.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 03:59 pm:

I use Mobil 1 in my modern car and pick up and dump truck. I have used Mobil 1 since 1995. I use Mobil Delvac 1 (synthetic for diesel), in my tractor, skid-loader,and lawn mower. When I bought my TT two years ago. The oil jobber in my area suggested It might soften neoprene seals in the model t. I believe him because he had nothing to gain financially by telling me this. I really like the synthetic oil, especially in the cold weather.the engine turns over easier and I don't feel as bad if I run run over a little on my oil change. My old pick-up has 212000 (approx) miles on it and I have never had to add oil between changes. The price is ridiculously high but I think it costs so much a mile to drive whether you spend it on lube or repairs after the fact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 04:24 pm:

I use it in both my T's. In my modern cars i run over the change interval, typically until it is down a quart and then change. At 160,000 miles on my F250 -7.3 I go about 6000 miles before it is down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 05:35 pm:

I've been using it in my '21 Roadster for about 3 years now. Very happy with it. The oil doesn't turn black immediately and is even somewhat clear at 1200 miles. I believe the clarity equates to less wear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 09:46 pm:

Has anyone noticed increased pedal effort with the synthetic oil? I did and couldn't wait to get it out of the engine. I've tried full synthetic, semi synthetic and conventional oils, for my money I'll stick with the conventional oils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Von Nordheim on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:26 pm:

Kenny,
I used conventional oil in the engine for break in, after that.....I switched to synthetic. As part of the rebuild, I re-lined the bands with Kelvar. I did not notice any difference in pedal pressure between oils. I have heard that Kelvar provides a softer pedal compaired to wood....However, I have not driven a model T with wood bands and can not personally back this clame up. Prior to using Synthetic oil, I was also told that using Synthetic oil would cause the clutch disks to slip. This did not happen to me. A good friend who switched to Synthetic in his 2 1915 T's had no problems either. One of his T's has the original steel clutch disks and the other has the turbo 400 clutch disks. My T also has turbo 400 clutch disks. Both our T's use the original clutch springs. I use Mobil 1 because it is available from Costco & Wallmart at a better price than at parts stores.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:30 pm:

We've used it in our T's since I tried it last year, and it allowed cranking without jacking up a wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Gilham on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:36 pm:

Rob, I believe that photo belongs on a calender. WOW! Beautiful Car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:42 pm:

Been using synthetic oil since re-build 8 years ago. Right now I have 5 W 20, with ZDDP Plus , and a quart of Lucas Oil additive for winter driving. Had to take up average of .005 on the rods. Cleaned the inner pan flange, installed gasket & placed "horse-shoes" inside, re-used pan gasket & buttoned it up....... no leaks....... yet !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Von Nordheim on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 12:01 am:

It was't that long ago when I was tarred and feathered on the forum by some for defending my use of synthetic oil. Happy to hear from other T owners who have seen a difference using synthetic oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 12:14 am:

Les: Been there myself. Now if we could only get the forum "lurkers" to participate, imagine the Forum activity !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Magedanz on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 12:48 am:

Some of us lurk because we are still learning and don't want to open our mouths and remove all doubt about our Model T "ignorance."
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 01:27 am:

I have never used synthetic oil in an engine but have been around synthetic gear oil in heavy truck transmissions and rear ends for years. We have had a very high decrease in failures from wear and tear since we have gone to it. I know the cost is high at around $30 a gallon and we use 4-6 gallons per transmission or rear end but the improved life more than pays for it. Also it may run for 60 to 100 thousand miles or more befor it gets changed depending on conditions it is used in. If it gets contaminated with water it is changed right away. I would consider using it in an engine just for the reduced wear .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Healey on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 01:27 am:

I want to thank everyone for their respone to my asking about using synthetic oil in model T's

John Healey in Las Cruces, NM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Healey on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 01:48 am:

Another question please if you folks don't mind.
Are brass cotter pins available from anyone??? I have thought of making them myself but would rather buy an assortment if possible.

I would like to use them when I adjust the clutch
so I don't have to worry about them if I drop on or more into the trans. They will not be attracted by the magnets on the flywheel and if they do get into the transmission gears or other areas in the transmission the brass would do less harm than steel cotter pins.

Thanks John Healey in Las Cruces, NM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 10:25 am:

Snyder's sell a brass cotter set for the early lights,but since brass is soft,I'd be leary of using it in your tranny.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 11:14 am:

Joe M :

Ignorance has hope, dumb is dumb. We learn by asking questions. There are no stupid questions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 03:40 pm:

John,

There is no law that says you have to you cotter pins in the clutch fingers. You could use an appropriate diameter brass wire and neatly twist the two ends together.

However, if you're worried about dropping a steel cotter pin, simply tie a long string to the loop end and fish the cotter pin back out if it drops. Snip the string off when done.


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