Ruckstell Oilers/Safety bolt.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Ruckstell Oilers/Safety bolt.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 09:55 pm:

The serial number is CP 13642. What can y’all tell me about it?
The big question is the hole at both ends. I was told that it had modern bearings. The holes should have a bolt to hold in the bearing. Is this correct?
What do I need to check to make sure it is going to be safe to drive around for a while?



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 10:16 pm:

I suppose it depends on the type of modern bearing for a T You're talking about. There is the floating hub type and the cylinder insert type which as far as I know replaces the Hyatt bearings. If it's the latter then I don't think so. If it's the floating hub type I do believe you have to lock them in. However I would strongly encourage you to tear the rearend apart so that you know what you have before you hit the open roads. If you're just driving around in a field for just a bit it might be ok but other than that you don't know what you don't know. Happy trails.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 10:17 pm:

Modern bearings could be Hyatt replacements or it could be floating hubs. You will likely have to remove the wheel hubs to know for sure. I remember your father-in-law driving the car in the Richardson Christmas Parade about 20 years ago. I have no idea what is there. Modern bearings are often retained by a bolt thru the grease fitting hole. You might google Model T floating hubs, modern rear axle bearings, etc. and see what you can learn. Do you know what's on the yellow speedster, that might give you a clue as to what you might find here. I think even with modern bearings the axle will keep the wheel from coming off, barring a broken axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 11:46 pm:

Hello Ted,
Yes Gerald did drive the T in the Richardson parade. The rear end could have been swapped out since then. I am really nervous about tearing it down. With any luck someone in the club could help with me determine the status of the Ruckstell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 12:01 am:

If there is a single nut holding the hub on and there are six bolt heads holding the front hub plate and the spokes, you most probably have the original Ford setup. If you have a puller, remove the hub and you will see the end of a Hyatt bearing, then you definitely have the original setup.
You can post pictures if are not sure


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 12:32 am:

The hole at each end is for the grease cup. To me it just looks like the sleeve is pressed in and you are missing the grease cups.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Kramer on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 01:47 am:

If you have the new cartridge bearings, there is an Allen set screw down inside that hole. Some of them can be greased thru that hole if needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 11:43 am:

Bottom line is pull the hubs and look. Until then we are all just playing a guessing game.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 11:53 am:

Steve, if I were you I would pull the rear axle out and check everything out. If the ruckstell is worn out it can get stuck in neutral then you have no transmission brake.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 11:54 am:

You have a Canadian Ruckstell, and I agree with Mark, that only the grease cup is missing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 04:33 pm:

Here is a picture of what is at the end. Do I need to go further?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Kramer on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 05:17 pm:

You have the safety full floating hubs. I would either put a plug or grease cup in the holes and then never put grease in them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 06:05 pm:

Thank you for the best news all day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 07:42 pm:

It's need more then a plug in the hole. They need a bolt to hold them in place. Bet there's a groove that the bolt will go into. You want the bolt to go in but not so deep to distort the hearing housing. Some of these had open pin type roller bearings at the in board end that did require greasing every so often.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Kramer on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 09:05 pm:

There was a very long discussion in 2013 concerning these hubs. I believe all styles of this type of hub has a bolt that goes through the axle tube, either thru the grease hole or thru a hole that is drilled and tapped somewhere else close to that location, and is screwed down just enough to engage a slot to keep the hub from coming out in case of the axle breaking. If you google in "safety floating model t hubs" you can find install instructions and all types of info on these hubs. Good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 10:17 pm:

I just read thru the 2013 thread, people sure got hot under the collar. It seems there is a slot on the inner hub that needs a bolt (or something) to stop the whole assembly from falling out should the axle break. As this is the main objective of so called safety hubs, the bolt should be place. The main disagreement, which didn't seem to be resolved, was should the bolt hold the assembly in place with no end play or a little loose so there are not two conflicting areas of thrust. I personally prefer a little end play, but I don't want to reignite the argument, so I recommend short bolts....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 02, 2016 - 12:25 pm:

I hope the car was not driven without the retaining bolts in place! The only thing holding the cartridge and wheels in place would be the O-rings!! When I installed a set I drilled and taped a hole at the bottom of the housing and kept the grease fitting/cup where it was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 02, 2016 - 01:14 pm:

RE my last post; duh! The hub nut holds hub on the axle to keep it in place. The bolt is a safety lock to keep the wheel on in case of axle breakage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, January 02, 2016 - 01:28 pm:

If you're thinking of installing the Ruckstell under the car without taking it apart for inspection, I would advise against it unless you know for sure what its pedigree is.

I bought a "rebuilt" Ruckstell from a fine gentleman in South Dakota that had bought it at an estate sale, then decided not to use it. When I took it apart, it had indeed been gone through by the original estate owner, but the ring gear was shot and it had one of the dreaded Babbitt thrust washers on the passenger side (the driver side has the special Ruckstell ball bearing). Also, the unit had been re-assembled completely dry, as if the parts had been installed just to keep everything together until the original estate owner wanted to rebuild it for real. The internal clearances had not been set.

With Stan Howe's guidance via emails (thanks, Stan!), I rebuilt the unit with a new ring gear and ring gear bolts, new ball bearing, new bronze thrust washer, new planetary gear pins, new Fun Projects pinion bearing kit, and new axle bearing sleeves (the Hyatt bearings themselves were fine). I bought the required shims and set the internal clearances per the MTFCA Ruckstell book.

Don't be afraid to tear into it, this one was my first rear axle rebuild (of any kind), and I enjoyed it and learned a lot! :-)

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