Wet T-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Wet T-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 08:44 am:



It was almost like this around here last week!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 08:45 am:



I don't know the story about this one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 08:45 am:

Hope y'all are alright up there. Happy new year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 09:13 am:

Well the first photo has at least one street named correctly...Water Street.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 09:31 am:

The flood at the top was March 27, 28, and 29 1913 in Warren, PA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 11:07 am:

Justin knew where it was. Some of the buildings are still there on the left and right distance.



That was sure a wet 1913 T

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 11:44 am:

Wet T. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 12:35 pm:

Hi Dennis, At least around here (here being eastern Massachusetts), if you are purchasing a home, to avoid streets named Water St. River Road, Lake St.etc unless you have done significant research. They have those names for a reason.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 02:59 pm:

Jay read my mind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 04:53 pm:

Jay,

Memories of RDR when I see that young lady posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 05:25 pm:

Herb,

I really like this photo. I've done that whilst fording a creek. If I knew I had that much water to cross I would probably slip the fan belt off of the fan pulley.

That photo got me to thinking, a stock T is limited on the depth of water you can cross by the location of it's carburetor. I'm thinking that my improved Ford (1927 roadster Pickup "Rusty") can probably go a little deeper due to it's stock Vaporizer carburetor. I assume that the limiting factor is the vent on the carburetor bowl. I bet if you put a barb on the bowl vent and ran a hose up to the top of the head a T could run with water all the way up to the head!

I always get the giggles when I see a Toyota Landcruiser with a snorkel on the carb which runs up above the top of the windshield. I assume the ignition will short out long before the steering wheel submerges.

So, what is the deepest anyone had submerged their T and had it continue running (with no damage done)?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 05:36 pm:

Terry wrote:

"I bet if you put a barb on the bowl vent and ran a hose up to the top of the head a T could run with water all the way up to the head!"

How will you keep the water out of the crankcase; sink stopper in the oil filler?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 06:11 pm:

Well Jay,

The first day of the new year posting & already you are in water

Hot Water that is .... :-)


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 07:39 pm:

Terry,

Ref the 4 x 4 SUVs etc with the snorkel kits. They make ignition systems designed for limited use under water. There are several videos on youtube but the one at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrFi-d7cCkc shows it can be done. The screen shot below is part way through the water obstacle and they drove out on the other side.



And the article at: http://www.fourwheeler.com/how-to/129-0706-waterproof-your-4x4-rig/ discusses some of the modifications that need to be done.

Bill that same article discusses the need to replace vented filler caps etc. so the water won't get into the SUV engine, transmission etc. For the T, an adapter could be made To raise the oil filler (they actually had an accessory for that) and to make it water tight. For a stock T, I think the commutator would short out before the water was a major issue for the oil filler -- but a wave could get both of them at the same time.

I believe a "T" could be fairly easily fitted with the items needed to drive through water a little deeper than a stock T could make it through. But for sure you don't want to get wooden parts of the coil box, dash, etc. wet.

And I don't recall seeing a water proof commutator, but there were several accessories that would raise the commutator six or more inches higher. But I think mounting one of the waterproof (or water limiting is probably more accurate) distributors would be a better option.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW Troy, Mo. on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

Did not have to go far to get modern pictures like that Herb!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, January 01, 2016 - 09:05 pm:

Even the early V8's had a problem. Especially the 1941 which had the fan on the front of the crankshaft and the distributor on the end of the camshaft with metal tubes for the spark plug wires! When I was in high school I had a 38 Plymouth which was much less affected by high water I also had a tow chain and I knew where there was a dip which would flood. My friend and I would park right by that dip and when the unsuspecting drivers of Fords or other cars which got flooded out, we would approach them and ask if we could pull them out. We usually pulled them to a nearby gas station and they paid us usually a dollar. Sometimes we would get
$20 in an hour. I don't remember pulling out a T, but by the 1950's we didn't see many T's driving every day.
Norm


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