Picked up a 1925 Fordor today!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Picked up a 1925 Fordor today!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 07:51 pm:

At least I think it is a 1925. The engine number was from May of that year. Could not get any information about the history behind it. Had to deal with a relative of the owner who knew nothing. Oh well.

From items in the cab it looks like it could have been updated in 1985 and seen shows in 1989, 1992, and registered/inspected in 2005. The engine turns and looks to have had the bottom off with new bolts.

The downfalls are the electrical junction burned up, the radiator cap/top is not set, and the front seats are worn pretty well. The rear fenders looked to have been rough but smoothed out. Have fun with the pictures and let me know what you see.

Burned wires

Engine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 07:55 pm:

Radiator - wide tube


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:01 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:03 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael R Beary on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:23 pm:

Kyle, I see a fun car after a few hours of repair and service. Good luck to you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:24 pm:

Looks like a heck of a good start to me. Get her running and enjoy, or restore as you go. The horn is from something else, but the rest looks just as it should.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:26 pm:

Looks like a pretty good score. The wiring really isn't much of a challenge. I put new wiring harnesses, a generator, voltage regulator, new light sockets and bulbs in my sedan in just a couple hours one day last summer. I disassembled the switch and cleaned it up and put a new ammeter in it. The worst part of the job was trying to make a mount for the horn that had been sort of taped to the rod between the firewall and top of the radiator. Apparently 4 or 5 wraps of duct tape wasn't enough so they also wrapped a couple hundred yards of black electricians tape around it too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 08:57 pm:

Kyle - I was watching her on Craigslist. I think you did great!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 - 09:17 pm:

The wiring on my coupe looked like that after not using it for one winter with the battery still connected. The ammeter developed a short to ground and all the wiring loop was trashed.
A fuse would have stopped that problem, BUT if the short occurred when I was driving, it would have instantly died. I guess you pays your money and take your choice....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:34 am:

The hand brake quadrant will tell you whether the frame is 1925 (2 rivets) or not (4 rivets).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:35 am:

This is why a 25amp fuse is installed in the line from the battery. Smaller fuses in branch circuits is not a bad idea either, just hide them to prevent grumbling from the purists. Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:29 am:

Kyle,

I thought you were "cured" of the T illness ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Buckley on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 02:22 am:

Kyle, if you paid what you said in your last post on the forum here, then you really did get a great deal. She really looks great in the sunlight. Do you have a speedometer in it? Your setup for one. Enjoy your new car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brendan Hoban on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:21 am:

Congratulations Kyle, it looks like a winner

Just a bit of forensic investigation into the electrics and you will have a real gem.

Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:35 am:

Kyle,
Congratulations. The Fordor is a very comfortable car. I can speak from experience. 25 Years + with our Fordor.

Best regards, John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 08:21 am:

Don, even I will say safety trumps purism! For winter layup, I go so far as to disconnect the in-line fuse, I do have one car as yet un-fused, I disconnect the battery.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:25 am:

The Fordor really has an iconic profile that, to my aesthetic, points up the awkward
design of the Tudor, particularly in the humped roof and oval rear glass. The Fordor
has a cohesive and well-integrated look from front-to-back. I love that "billiard table"
flat top roof. Great looking car, Kyle. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:35 am:

Burger, no cure for this illness. Think you have it licked and it creeps back into you again! Definitely looking forward to getting it running again and warmer weather (no shop heater and it won't fit through the basement doors.) I do like it's elegant, simple design. A few more pictures...
Retractable cigarette lighter for the folks in the back seat?
The hole to nowhere with fake button hider?
Tilt steering wheel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:38 am:

Oval gas tank, thought they were square?
Leather holding straps on battery? Yikes!
Maybe time for new battery cables?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:42 am:

Door bell button? Toggle switch?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:52 am:

Kyle

Nice Fordor! And neat accessories, speedometer, and that cigar lighter....like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sosnoski on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:31 pm:

It looks like a 24 to me.
The tail light is the 24 style. The outside door handles and the window crank handles are the 24 style used on the wood framed doors. The finger pulls on the windshield look like the individual ones held on with two screws, which is the 24 style. The mixture adjusting rod is the 1924 style (not the 25 style with the swivel). Hard to tell from the photo, but the belt rail molding under the windshield looks like the separate aluminum one instead of the one stamped into the cowl sheet metal. It also has the brown interior where the 25 would have the blue interior (faded to gray). I don't see any of the items that would indicate it is a 1925.

If the Fordor is like the Coupe, there was a transition period between August and December of 1924 when they implemented these changes, so if it is a 25 model year it is a very early one - built before October of 1924.

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willard Revaz on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:56 pm:

My 1924 Fordor (August) has rounded splash shields like yours. 1925 started the squared off splash shields. Not to say they didn't find some old rounded ones and used them up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 02:08 pm:

No coilbox lid, ya got Gyped!! Looks like an original interior? Front seat just a little too far gone to leave it alone, rats. Whomever had the car sure liked accessories; wowziers!
Where is that fuel line going? And what's with the tape around the frame?
Looks like you've got a few relatively minor things to take care of, and I'd be sure to look inside the rear axle for Bronze thrusts, if the previous owner can't testify to their presence!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 03:22 pm:

A few things people mentioned I've checked out.

Finger pulls are held by 2 screws. The belt is an aluminum piece. Two screws hold the parking brake adjuster to the frame, although there are two holes drilled in the frame to the interior of the bracket and the bracket looks like it was taken out. The only thing aluminum are the doors, sill below doors, and the upper back half around the rear window.

Ordered up some electrical wires and a new ammeter. Will see where that takes me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:26 pm:

Brake quadrants were originally riveted to the frame. The four holes in the frame were continued beyond the two-hole quadrant's introduction, so with screws holding your quadrant on, hard to say!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 07:48 pm:

You asked that we let you know what we see earlier, I see a wonderful car that'll bring a lot of joy! And dirty fingers... :-)
I wonder if the fuel line wasn't just pushed to the rear (instead of cutting it) when the previous owner installed the shut-off valve by the carb.

I can't wait until you get it running!
AND
I gotta get me a fatman for mine!
Nice car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 08:46 pm:

Bruce McCalley's Model T Encyclopedia has 42 pages (!) of 1923-1925 identifying features, with lots of pictures. Some study there should pin down this car's model year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Pierce CT on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 09:27 pm:

Steve, I checked out the encyclopedia on this site and it does identify many features relating to 1924.

One thing I find interesting is that I have an oval gas tank under the whole seat with tool boxes on the ends. It is filled from the passenger seat. It looks very original at least the mounting system and the way it sits under the seat. Maybe it came from a touring car? Who knows, perhaps a touring car donated it's rolling chassis.

Maybe someone can show me a picture of what the passenger seat cubbyhole looks like with the square tank? I'll have to look closer to see if my floor was butchered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 09:34 pm:

Kyle, Nice find. I'm jealous. A 1925 Fordor is my choice for my next T. In the Springtime of 1936, when my mom was 2 months old, she rode all the way from Yale Oklahoma to California in the back seat floorboard. Grandpa, Grandma, and my mom, along with everything they owned made the trip down what became route 66. It took them 10 days .. I hope to have a 25 Fordor someday.... Have fun and be safe ...... Donnie Brown ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 09:57 pm:

Congrats Kyle, she's a beauty. Love to see yet another T in good hands and not just sitting in a garage collecting dust. Best of luck with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 11:27 pm:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 12:35 am:

Dave Sosnoski, what do the window crank handles look like for the steel doors? Thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sosnoski on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 06:26 am:

Kyle,

All Fordor's had the oval tank under the seat. The Tudor Sedan has the square tank under the driver's seat. The earlier suicide door coupes also used the square tank which was mounted in the trunk. When the Coupe and Tudor were redesigned for the 1926 model year they moved the gas tank up into the cowl. The Fordor however kept the oval tank under the seat.

I revise my estimate - the two screw finger pulls on the windshield means the body was built before August 1924 which is the transition to the 1925 model year. It is definitely a 1924 body.

David, the steel door window crank handle is the same as the 26-27. It doesn't have the big screw in the middle.

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 07:25 am:

Man, I'd leave that thing just like it is and just drive it. Great car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 10:05 am:

This website's version of the encyclopedia is severely truncated. It has three pages covering the 1923-1925 models, while the disk version has 42 pages. The disk also includes the owner's manuals, the shop manual (Bible), parts books, and daily serial number records for most years. I call it the best $50 you can spend on your Model T.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:18 pm:

Thanks Dave. I was under the impression the '25 handles had the screw in the middle too. Now I won't have to drill and tap holes in my repro regulators! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 10:28 pm:

Fellows, what's with the switch panel? It looks like the cast switch lever used on the first electric fitted cars, but not exactly the same. I am unfamiliar with that set-up on our Canadian sourced cars.

Allan from down under.


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